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  • Category Archives The Lost Years Of Sol Duc Hot Springs
  • Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington

    This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted February 12, 2016.

    HISTORIC PLACES IN OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

    15 Elwha River Hydroelectric Power Plant
    Elwha River Hydroelectric Power Plant
    December 15, 1988
    (#88002741)
    N end of Lake Aldwell
    48°05′42″N 123°33′18″W
    Port Angeles
    18 Glines Canyon Hydroelectric Power Plant
    Glines Canyon Hydroelectric Power Plant
    December 15, 1988
    (#88002742)
    N end of Lake Mills at Elwha River
    48°00′11″N 123°35′54″W
    Port Angeles

    Things happen that should always be remembered.

    ARE YOU AS SHOCKED AS I AM? Who knew that our Elwha River and Glines Canyon Hydroelectric power plants were placed on on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington on Dec 15, 1988?

    UNBELIEVABLE… Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    Built in 1910 and 1926 respectively, the Elwha dam (108 feet high) and Glines Canyon dam (210 feet high) provided the only power to a lumber mill town called Port Angeles, situated on the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

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    Just, a town called Port Angeles? Port Angeles WA has been our Rains family town for 96 years.

    Find Your park tell your story. Olympic National Park is my park, this is a continuation of my inside story, I have known the Olympic National Park from the inside out for over 70 years. I was an INHOLDER in at Sol Duc Hot Springs inside the  Olympic National Park in 1944 and I still am an ONP INHOLDER inside the park, on the Elwha River,  Sat Feb 13, 2016.

    Forget Me Not

    Things happen that should always be remembered.

    Who remembers? Who Cares?

    History is written by the victors. – Winston Churchill..

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    SO WHAT HAPPENED TO OUR OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARKS LAKES AND HISTORIC ELWHA RIVER HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANTS?

    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    So, the tribes, along with environmental groups, began petitioning for restoration of the Elwha and its salmon runs. In 1992, their petitions were heard and President George H.W. Bush signed legislation to allow the federal government to buy the dams and begin conducting studies regarding the feasibility of their removal.

    Bush signed legislation… a document of historical interest, it’s only 8 pages long.

    January 3, 1992 H.R.4844 An Act To restore Olympic National Park and the Elwha River ecosystem and fisheries in the State of Washington.

    For local tribes and environmental advocates, it was time to go to work.

    Hundreds of environmental studies later, the decision to remove the dams was finalized.

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    The Supplemental EIS lists the proposed flood mitigation contained in the 1996 Final Environmental Impact Statement and the proposed changes to that list.

    You can find the Supplemental EIS  a document of historical interest, it’s only 366 pages long at:

    http://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/loader.cfm?csModule=security/getfile&PageID=136240

    THEN WHAT HAPPENED TO OUR OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARKS LAKES AND HISTORIC POWER PLANTS?

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    World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After …

    news.nationalgeographic.com/…/140826-el…
    National Geographic Society

    Aug 27, 2014 – “Thirty years ago, when I was in law school in the Pacific Northwest, removing the dams from the Elwha River was seen as a crazy, wild-eyed …

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    Find Your park tell your story. Olympic National Park is my park.

    Who knew the Olympic National Park Altair and Elwha River’s Campgrounds Community Kitchens  were placed on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington on July 13, 2007?

    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    The Campground Community kitchens were built by the CCC Elwha Camp #935, project 60 in 1933.

     

    2 Altair Campground Community Kitchen
    Altair Campground Community Kitchen
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000732)
    Approx. 4 mi. S of US 101
    48°00′42″N 123°35′30″W
    Port Angeles

    It’s a Place its a thing

    12 Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
    Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000735)
    3 miles south of U.S. Route 101 in Washington
    48°01′39″N 123°35′13″W
    Port Angeles

    Olympic National Park is my park

    13 Elwha Ranger Station
    Elwha Ranger Station
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000716)
    Approximately 3 miles southeast of WA 101 on the Olympic Hot Springs Rd.
    48°01′00″N 123°35′27″W
    Port Angeles

    The Olympic Hot Springs Road is my road.

    THIS ROAD WAS THE HISTORIC “GATEWAY TO THE OLYMPICS”

    Who remembers? Who Cares? History is written by the victors. – Winston Churchill..

    The National Park Service,  HISTORICALLY rewrites, renames, redirects, obscures, excludes, deletes and destroys,  much of the HISTORY of the Olympic National Park

    Things happen that should always be remembered. in 1909 The Olympic Hot Spring Resort  was a flourishing tourist destination.

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    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    Repairs and widening of 22 miles of the Olympic Hot Spring Road was done by  the CCC Elwha Camp #935, project 60 in 1933-1934.

    Access to the Olympic National Park interconnected ROAD AND TRAIL SYSTEM belongs to all of us.

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    The Sol Duc River Shelter?

    The renamed as Canyon Creek Shelter, renumbered as #07000712, coordinates missing? image missing? Approximate distance from wherever? is and was  the Sol Duc Shelter.

    The Sol Duc River Shelter was my Shelter inside the Olympic National park in 1944.

    Who remembers? Who Cares? History is written by the victors. – Winston Churchill..

    The National Park Service,  HISTORICALLY rewrites, renames, redirects, obscures, excludes, deletes and destroys,  much of the HISTORY of the Olympic National Park

    30 North Fork Sol Duc Shelter Upload image
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000725)
    Approx. 9.5 mi. from North Fork Sol Duc Trailhead
    47°59′56″N 123°45′42″W
    Port Angeles
    5 Canyon Creek Shelter
    Canyon Creek Shelter
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000712)
    Approximately .9 miles north of the Upper Sol Duc River Trailhead
    Coordinates missing
    Port Angeles

    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    It’s a Place… it’s in the Olympic National Park, tell your story, things happen that should never be forgotten.

    to be continued…

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    There are 49 properties and districts listed on the National Register in Clallam County.

    This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Clallam County, Washington, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.[1]


  • Find Your Park History Camp Elwha CCC 935

    My park is the Olympic National Park

    FIND YOUR PARKS PAST

    1933-1942 CCC CAMPS IN WA STATE
    May 21, 1933, Project F-17, Co. #935 CAMP ELWHA,

    Things happen that should always be remembered

    After over 40 hours of researching on the CCC Camps Legacy in my park, the Olympic National Park, I have found the “KEY” for documenting and identifying WA State and Clallam County CCC CAMPS.
    I started here.

    Olympic NP: Historic Resource Study (Chapter 5)

    www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online…/hrs/chap5.htm
    National Park Service Oct 1, 2009 – Three of these programs had a paramount influence on the early development of Olympic National Park: The Civilian Conservation Corps …National Park Service
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    Found this…
    ON 10 JUNE 1933 the PORT ANGELES EVENING NEWS (PAEN) devoted headline space and several columns to describing the establishment of the ELWHA CAMP, known as F-17:

    F-17 935 5/21/1933 Seattle Port Angeles
    Project Co. Date Railroad Post Office Location

    —————————–
    Feb 2, 2016 documentation finally found here

    CCC Camp Lists – CCC Legacy

    Historic Index of Camp Listings by State
    1933-1942 CCC CAMPS IN WA STATE
    May 21, 1933, Project F-17, Co. #935 CAMP ELWHA,

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    The completer list of historic CCC CAMPS IN WA STATE can be found here
    Feb 2, 2016

    Find Your Park? 1933 WA State CCC Camps – Behind My …

    Posted on February 2, 2016 12:20 pm by Pearl Rains Hewett
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    Find Your Park – Centennial (U.S. National Park Service)

    GO FIND YOUR PARKS PAST…
    Find Your Park Things happen that should always be remembered?
    Find Your Park SHARE YOUR PARKS STORY..
    SHARE YOUR PARKS HISTORY.INSPIRE SOMEONE ELSE…..
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    Olympic NP: Historic Resource Study (Chapter 5)

    Unedited text for CAMP ELWHA

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    NOTE Camp Elwha was incorrectly identified as the 936th company, on 10 June 1933, in the Port Angeles Evening News ,
    F-74 936 5/11/1934 Hoquiam Humptulips Hoquiam 30 mi N

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    The Civilian Conservation Corps
    Olympic NP: Historic Resource Study (Chapter 5)
    Camp Elwha. Among the most active CCC camps within the present Olympic National Park was Camp Elwha, located on a gently sloping hillside several hundred yards south of the present Elwha Ranger Station. As one of the first CCC camps established on the north Olympic Peninsula, the arrival of the “forest army” on the Elwha River aroused great interest among local residents. On 10 June 1933 the Port Angeles Evening News devoted headline space and several columns to describing the establishment of the Elwha Camp, known as F-17:
    Two hundred and twenty strong, the 936th company Civilian Conservation Corps of the United States is in camp on “My Rose” creek up the Elwha canyon, within a stone’s throw of the soldiers’ bridge—and taking part in the greatest single government venture these parts have glimpsed since spruce division days of the world war. . . . In a tented city now, the “new forestry army” is rapidly completing a modern and elaborate camp headquarters in a clearing between Griff and My Rose creeks. On the site, 100,000 board feet of lumber is rapidly taking shape in the form of barracks, headquarters buildings, infirmary, dining hall, store room, camp exchange, etc., and District Forester Vallad announced today that construction would also begin immediately on a bunkhouse, warehouse and oil storage plant for the regular Forest Service (PAEN 1933, 10 June).
    The work program outlined for both the main Elwha Camp and the side camp at Slab Camp in the hills southeast of Port Angeles included the construction of roads from the Elwha Ranger Station to Hayes River (on the Elwha River); from Danz Ranch at the forest boundary to Deer Park lookout, to Ennis Creek Ranger Station, and then to the Lost Mountain Road; and from the Little River Road to Ennis Creek Ranger Station. Work plans also called for the widening and straightening of the Olympic (Boulder Creek) Hot Springs Road plus the improvement of several campgrounds (PAEN 1933, 10 June).
    A month later, in mid July, the tents at the Elwha CCC Camp were gone and the headquarters for the 180-man company had taken on the look of permanence. Added to the original cluster of camp buildings were four 104 x 22 foot barracks structures, a mess hall, an administration building, a bathhouse with a “Niagara Falls” shower and ancillary workshops and storage buildings. Road projects were also proceeding with haste. By mid July, one and one-half miles of road were completed to Glines Canyon, and road crews were pushing toward Heart O’the Hills. The local press noted, “The road jobs now being carried forward by the CCC crews in the Elwha forest district will effect improvements of vital importance to [the] protection of Olympic timber from fire” (PAEN 1933, 19 July).
    The morale of the first recruitment of Elwha CCC enrollees was exceptionally high. According to journalistic accounts, every member of the fledgling camp claimed that “Elwha camp has the finest crew of any in the country” (PAEN 1933, 19 July). In the early months of operation, there were reportedly few withdrawals; the men were healthy and spirits exuberant. One reason for this initial good spirit at the Elwha Camp may be attributed to the high percentage of enrollees from Clallam County, Seattle, and Bellingham, Washington. These men were fairly familiar and comfortable with the surroundings (PAEN 1933, 19 July). Unlike many CCC camps across the country that consisted of men transported great distances to their place of assignment, the early Elwha CCC camp was comprised of men almost exclusively from western Washington.
    At the end of the first six month recruitment period, the esprit de corps continued to remain high as demonstrated by the great percentage of reenlistments and the reported accomplishments of the company. In late September 1933, the Port Angeles Evening News stated:
    What is believed to be a probable record for Civilian Conservation Corps units in Washington is reported from the C.C.C. Camp on the Elwha river, where 91 per cent of the present force has re-enrolled for the second six month’s work period starting in October. . . . This is [sic] an exceptional mark! It indicates how the C.C.C. men and boys of the Elwha feel toward their camp and the opportunity the corps has given them to earn their living and help their families financially, in addition, corps leaders feel (PAEN 1933, 21 September).
    Road building projects, which was to be the major thrust of Camp Elwha’s energies, continued unabated. By mid September 1933, a five-mile section of “truck trail” was completed up the Elwha River to Wolf Creek. A second major project involving road connections with the CCC Slab Camp/Danz Ranch, was likewise pushing forward (PAEN 1933, 21 September). Far from any roads, the CCC undertook the construction of a four-horse, shake-sided barn at Elkhorn Ranger Station during the summer of 1933 (UW 1934, 20 August).
    By early 1934, twenty-two miles of road were completed by the Elwha CCC crews. A small crew was about to begin widening the road to Olympic (Boulder Creek) Hot Springs. Fifty men, still located at the Danz Ranch side camp, worked on roads to Deer Park and to Ennis Creek. A newly established side camp at Heart O’the Hills had thirty-five men engaged in building a thoroughfare from Heart O’the Hills to Coleman’s Ranch on the Little River. The road building projects accomplished by the crews from Camp Elwha aimed at providing the Forest Service with “a continuous roadway from the Elwha River to Slab Camp and the Deer Park region by way of Little River, Mount Angeles and Ennis creek” (PAEN 1934, 6 January). New telephone connections that eventually followed this route, plus the roads themselves, were principally for fire protection purposes.
    At the outset of 1934 other projects, in addition to the construction of roads, were in progress or planned. These projects included the installation of a water and light system at the Elwha CCC Camp, and the construction of a new Ennis Creek Guard Station on the Mount Angeles Road near Heart O’the Hills. In addition, work on public campgrounds on the Elwha River at Lake Mills, Whiskey Bend and Altaire, was planned (PAEN 1934, 6 January).
    Civilian Conservation Corps camps typically were located and relocated depending on the priority of work projects in a particular geographic area. Under the direction of the Forest Service, CCC camps and side camps on the Olympic National Forest were moved on several occasions during the 1930s. One year after the establishment of CCC Camp Elwha, orders were issued to abandon the campsite and relocate to a site seven and one-half miles north of Humptulips in the southern end of the Olympic Peninsula. (CCC Camp Snider, west of Lake Crescent, and Camp Twin, on the Strait of Juan de Fuca coast, west of Port Angeles, also shifted their companies in 1934.) While the corpsmen at Elwha made preparation for their move to Humptulips

    in May, other CCC crews from the Louella CCC Camp near Sequim, took over completion of the road to Deer Park (PAEN 1934, 3 April). In recognition of the efforts of the CCC in completing the winding Deer Park Road, it became known as “The Highway of the CCC” (Carroll 1973, 103).
    The phase out of CCC Camp Elwha was only temporary. In late September 1934 official announcement came from the Forest Service regional office in Portland, Oregon, that the abandoned but intact Elwha Camp (as well as the Snider and Twin Camps) would be restored to activity in October that year. During the winter months of 1934 and 1935, the Elwha CCC Camp was among fifteen National Forest Service camps in the state of Washington (PAEN 1934, 24 September).
    For three years in the late 1930s Camp Elwha was used only at intervals as a small side camp (PAEN 1937, 16 July). Only sporadically CCC corpsmen continued to undertake projects on Forest Service land in the vicinity of the Elwha River drainage.

    In the spring of 1935 “improvements” were made to both the Elwha and Altaire public campgrounds. Betterments at these two campgrounds included work on roads, trails, camping spots, the installation of water pipes, playground equipment, horse-shoe courts for adults, and the construction of sturdy, open-sided community kitchens.

    The Port Angeles Evening News exuded enthusiasm in its description of the improvements at Altaire Campground made by the CCC: “There’s a splendid community kitchen, of rustic design, with a concrete floor and two 54-inch stoves built of rock and cement. There are long tables beside the kitchen and about the grounds are 17 tables and sufficient stoves, all constructed of stone, to take care of as many parties as the tables accommodate” (PAEN 1935, 27 March).
    The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens, in 1983, are the only two remaining CCC structures of this type in Olympic National Park. Built of natural peeled logs, shakes and masonry, the rustic materials and careful proportioning of these structures blend well with their immediate natural surroundings.

    The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens are representative examples of rustic style architecture, which became a hallmark of the CCC throughout the country (Throop 1979, 58).
    When a large contingency of CCC enrollees transferred from Camp Snider several miles west of Lake Crescent, to Camp Elwha in the spring of 1937, additional campground development was undertaken at Olympic (Boulder Creek) Hot Springs, Deer Park and Ennis Creek, at the base of Mount Angeles.

    In addition CCC crews made further improvements to the Olympic Hot Springs Road

    and the Hurricane Ridge Road. Work crews at Deer Park, an Elwha side camp, pursued work on a new ski run and completed an addition to the Deer Park Camp building to accommodate winter ski parties (PAEN 1937, 21 April; 16 July).
    During the CCC’s tenure at Camp Elwha several changes and additions were made by corpsmen to the existing Forest Service Elwha Ranger Station buildings. Eleven buildings stood at the ranger station site at the time the CCC established their camp nearby in 1933. Among the first projects undertaken by the Elwha CCC enrollees was the construction of a porch on the main ranger station building (PAEN 1933, 19 July). Two years later, in 1935, the ranger station was moved slightly, an addition was constructed and landscaping around the ranger station completed (PAEN 1935, 27 March). During the mid 1930s, corpsmen from the Elwha Camp worked on other projects at the ranger station. On Griff Creek, separating the CCC camp from the ranger station, CCC men built a water wheel to furnish electricity to the ranger station office and ranger residence (PAEN 1934, 21 March). Near the ranger station office, an incinerator was constructed for burning refuse from the CCC camp and public campgrounds in the area. The erection of the gas, oil and grease rack building in the utility area represented the largest outlay of CCC manpower and money at the Elwha Ranger Station (PAEN 1935, 27 March). It is the only building built totally by CCC labor in the ranger station complex that stands on its original site. The decorative pine tree design, used throughout the nation as the logo of both the Forest Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps, is cut out of boards on the porch and at the upper gable ends of this building (Throop 1979, 42). It symbolizes and serves as a constant visual reminder of the contribution of the CCC to the Elwha Ranger Station.
    In addition to visible structural changes completed at the Elwha Ranger Station and elsewhere, the construction and maintenance of roads, and the development of campground facilities in forests on the north Olympic Peninsula, Forest Service Camp F-19 on the Elwha River planned and executed numerous other projects between 1933 and 1938.

    Elwha corpsmen constructed and maintained trails, built bridges, erected signs and markers, conducted surveys, constructed fences and guard rails, laid and maintained telephone lines, built parking areas and parking overlooks, razed “undesirable” structures, suppressed fires and conducted field plantings (NARS:RG 95 1934, 1 June; 1937, 6 August; ca. 1938 n.d.).

    The exact geographic locations of many Camp Elwha projects are not always readily identifiable and, in fact, much of their work has been obliterated over the years. However, the overall effect of the various CCC projects undertaken by the Elwha Camp is very much a part of the overall development of recreational use in certain areas in the northern part of Olympic National Park.
    The work of the Elwha CCC Camps is not unique but, in fact, is representative of the kinds of projects pursued by several other work camps supervised by the National Forest Service on the Olympic Peninsula. Prior to the 1938 creation of Olympic National Park, other CCC main camps and side camps located on Forest Service land around the Peninsula likewise stimulated recreational activity in areas now contained in the Park.
    —————————————————————–
    In the spring of 1935 “improvements” were made to both the Elwha and Altaire public campgrounds. Betterments at these two campgrounds included work on roads, trails, camping spots, the installation of water pipes, playground equipment, horse-shoe courts for adults, and the construction of sturdy, open-sided community kitchens.

    The Port Angeles Evening News exuded enthusiasm in its description of the improvements at Altaire Campground made by the CCC: “There’s a splendid community kitchen, of rustic design, with a concrete floor and two 54-inch stoves built of rock and cement. There are long tables beside the kitchen and about the grounds are 17 tables and sufficient stoves, all constructed of stone, to take care of as many parties as the tables accommodate” (PAEN 1935, 27 March).
    The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens, in 1983, are the only two remaining CCC structures of this type in Olympic National Park. Built of natural peeled logs, shakes and masonry, the rustic materials and careful proportioning of these structures blend well with their immediate natural surroundings. The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens are representative examples of rustic style architecture, which became a hallmark of the CCC throughout the country (Throop 1979, 58).

    ————————————————————————————–

    Things happen that should always be remembered

    The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens, in 1983, are the only two remaining CCC structures of this type in Olympic National Park.

    AND, THEY WERE BUILT BY   CAMP ELWHA COMPANY 935.

    National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam …

    https://en.wikipedia.org/…/National_Register_of_Historic_Plac
    Wikipedia

    This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington. This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts …
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    Elwha Ranger Station
    Elwha Ranger Station
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000716)
    Approximately 3 miles southeast of WA 101 on the Olympic Hot Springs Rd.
    48°01′00″N 123°35′27″W
    Port Angeles

     

    Altair Campground Community Kitchen
    Altair Campground Community Kitchen
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000732)
    Approx. 4 mi. S of US 101
    48°00′42″N 123°35′30″W
    Port Angeles

     

    Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
    Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000735)
    3 miles south of U.S. Route 101 in Washington
    48°01′39″N 123°35′13″W
    Port Angeles

    Things happen that should always be remembered

    Olympic National Park News Release
    March 20, 2014
    For Immediate Release

    Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said
    “Within what is technically and economically feasible, we continue to do our very best to protect the area’s natural and cultural resources and its wilderness character,”

    And,Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said . “Our options are limited, however, given the size and force of the river and the valley’s remote location within the Olympic Wilderness.”

    Campground Status Feb 3, 2016

    Altair Closed Closed indefinitely due to flood damage

     

    Elwha Closed Closed indefinitely due to flood damage

    Current Road Conditions

    Elwha Area Notices:
    • The Olympic Hot Springs Road is closed at the park boundary to motor vehicles due to storm damage. The road and all areas beyond the washout are closed to all public entry because of hazardous conditions along the road, river and adjacent areas.

    And when this happened in my park on my road to my private property? Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, could have used the same song and dance?

    BUT SHE SAID NOTHING

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    Saving Enchanted Valley Chalet – The Wild Olympics Scam

    www.wildolympicsscam.com/…/olympicagenda/SavingEnchantedValley

    The much loved Enchanted Valley Chalet has had the ever encroaching river eroding the meadowed landscape away for NINE YEARS. The Park, well aware of …

    Olympic National Park News Release
    March 20, 2014
    For Immediate Release

    Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said
    “Within what is technically and economically feasible, we continue to do our very best to protect the area’s natural and cultural resources and its wilderness character,”

    And,Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said . “Our options are limited, however, given the size and force of the river and the valley’s remote location within the Olympic Wilderness.”

    BLAH… BLAH… BLAH… SAME  OLD STORY “LET NATURE TAKE IT’S COURSE” JUST IN A DIFFERENT VALLEY

    AS HILLARY WOULD SAY… WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT MAKE?

    Key partners IN SAVING THE ENCHANTED CHALET  include the Washington State Historic Preservation Officer, Pacific West Regional Office of the National Park Service, and concerned organizations and citizens.

    Which shall leave me asking on my next posting HOW PROTECTED ARE …

    National Register of Historic Places listings in Olympic …

    https://en.wikipedia.org/…/National_Register_of_Historic_Plac
    Wikipedia

    This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Olympic National Park. This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the …

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    BELOW just another Grimm Fairy tale?

    Once Upon A Time in Olympic National Park

    My “inside store” is kind of like the original Grimm’s Brother  fairy tale

    You know the one… It starts off great..  but ends up with the Big Bad Wolf swallowing the grandmother whole and  the wolf eating Little Red Riding Hood..

    Olympic Hot Springs (Elwha) Road Closed (storm damage) 1/17/16
    The road is closed due to a washout just north of Elwha Campground, about 1 mile from the park boundary. Closed to public entry beyond the washout.

  • Find Your Park? 1933 WA State CCC Camps

    Go Find Your Park

    GO FIND IT’S PAST…

    Things happen that should always be remembered

    OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK , HISTORIC CAMP ELWHA CCC Camp?

    You’ve never heard of it? (keep reading)

    Our elected representatives in WA DC need to be reminded of things that happened in WA State.

    1933-1942 The WA STATE Civilian Conservation Corps … (CCC)  had a paramount influence on the early development of OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK.

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    CCC Legacy History Center

    www.ccclegacy.org/CCC_History_Center.html

    The CCC Legacy History Center shares CCC history, archival information, and … CCC Camp Lists … Please send your CCC story to ccc@ccclegacy.org …

    11,400 MEN
    57 CAMPS
    38 ON NATIONAL FORESTS
    5 ON NATIONAL PARKS
    4 ON STATE FORESTS
    2 ON STATE PARKS
    8 ON PRIVATE LAND FORESTS

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    JUNE 10, 1933, CAMP ELWHA WAS ONE OF THE FIRST  CCC CAMPS ESTABLISHED ON THE NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA

    HISTORIC CAMP ELWHA? You’ve never heard of it?

    Things happen that should always be remembered?

    JUNE 10, 1933, THE PORT ANGELES EVENING NEWS (PAEN) DEVOTED HEADLINE SPACE AND SEVERAL COLUMNS TO DESCRIBING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE ELWHA CAMP, KNOWN AS F-17:

    F-17 935 5/21/1933 Seattle Port Angeles
    Project Co. Date Railroad Post Office Location

    Project F-17 Co. #935 CAMP ELWHA was located on a gently sloping hillside several hundred yards south of the present Elwha Ranger Station. It was one of the first CCC Camps established on the North Olympic Peninsula.

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    Posted on Go Find Your Park ONP History Camp Louella

    Robert Bulchis, Tour of Service at Camp Louella, near Sequim, began on 11/08/1933.

    F-60 937 11/5/1933 Port Townsend Sequim
    Project Co. Date Railroad Post Office Location

    Project E-60 CO. #937  CAMP LOUELLA was located near an old forest guard station overlooking a shallow valley between two low mountains which was drained by a small creek called Jimmy-Come-Lately Creek. at the head of the valley there was a considerable drop down to the Dungeness River.

    —————————————————————————

    After  over 40 hours of  researching on  the CCC Legacy in my park, the Olympic National Park, I have found the “KEY” for documenting  and identifying CCC CAMPS that I have been been searching for….

    CAMP LOUELLA has been identified as Project E-60 Company  #937, collaborated by

    The Biography of Robert Bulchis
    CCCMan, Company 937, Camp Easton, Wenatchee National Forest, Lake Cle Elum, Washington & Camp Louella, Sequim, Washington.

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    CCC Camp Lists – CCC Legacy

    www.ccclegacy.org/CCC_Camp_Lists.html

    CCC Legacy is a non-profit membership organization established to promote the heritage of the Civilian … CCC Legacy, www.ccclegacy.org. … CCC Camp Lists …

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    CCC Camp Lists – CCC Legacy

    www.ccclegacy.org/CCC_Camp_Lists.html
    1933-1942 As you begin your CCC research, it is important to get the feel for the fast paced movement of CCC/military companies across the nation. A camp was identified …
    ——————————————————-

    1933-1942 The information contained in these listings was taken from Strength Reports. At the end of each 6 month enrollment period, the status of the camps, locations, personnel and numbers were reported in the Strength Report. These lists are a compilation of information produced from the enrollment periods listed below.

    They list the following information:

    • Agency identification number (Project #), 
    • Military company,
    • Date the company established the camp,
    • Railroad depot used by the camp,
    • Post office address used by the camp,
    • And, when available the camp nickname and distance from the post office.  
    • Identification of the Nine Military used during the administration of the CCC’S 1933-1942

    THE NINTH MILITARY DISTRICT INCLUDED WASHINGTON STATE, OREGON, IDAHO, MONTANA, UTAH, NEVADA CALIFORNIA, AND YELLOWSTONE PARK. 

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    CCC Camp Lists – CCC Legacy

    Historic Index of Camp Listings by State

    1933-1942 CCC CAMPS IN WA STATE

    Project Co. Date Railroad Post Office Location
    BR-58 208 6/3/1938 Sunnyside Sunnyside 3 mi S
    SP-13 219 11/1/1939 Skamania Skamania Beacon Rock 2 mi E
    NP-5 219 5/17/1940 Enumclaw Enumclaw White River 43 mi SE
    Navy-1 231 11/3/1935 Seattle Bremerton Ostrich Bay 5 mi N
    F-9 236 6/20/1933 Petores Masama
    F-11 246 6/20/1933 Chelan Chelan
    Army-1 252 8/1/1935 Ft. Lewis Ft. Lewis At-R.H.
    NP-1 252 6/30/1938 Ashford Longmire Tohoma Creek 9 mi E
    NP-7 252 4/15/1940 Morton Packwood Packwood 38 mi SE
    SP-3 266 6/18/1933 Oak Harbor Oak Harbor Deception Pass 14 mi NE
    NP-2 266 6/20/1935 Ashford Longmire Marada 22 mi E
    NP-9 293 4/19/1938 Pt. Angeles Pt. Angeles Elwha 13 mi SW
    NP-5 294 6/1/1936 Enumclaw Enumclaw White River 45 mi SE
    SCS-3 545 10/25/1935 Dayton Dayton 1 mi E
    SCS-5 546 10/25/1935 Pomeroy Pomeroy Garfield .5 mi W
    SCS-2 554 10/2/1937 Pullman Pullman 5 mi E
    P-203 562 8/21/1941 Lyman Lyman
    BR-42 572 5/15/1936 Naches Naches Clear Creek 38 mi W
    F-38 602 5/22/1933 Bingen Guler
    F-62 602 4/26/1934 Meyers Falls Meyers Falls
    F-37 603 5/22/1933 Carson Carson
    F-41 604 5/22/1933 White Salmon Guler
    F-43 605 5/22/1933 Stevenson Carson
    F-63 605 4/26/1934 Republic Republic
    P-61 608 9/28/1933 Vancouver Bks Vancouver Bks
    P-61 610 9/26/1933 Vancouver Bks Vancouver Bks
    F-2 610 5/30/1934 Metaline Falls Metaline Falls
    P-219 611 6/25/1933 Washugal Washugal
    SP-10 611 5/2/1934 Ft. George Wright Ft. George Wright
    F-35 697 6/15/1933 Morton Brandle
    NP-1 930 5/15/1933 Ashford Longmire Marada 22 mi E
    F-29 931 5/18/1933 Leavenworth Leavenworth
    F-87 931 5/2/1935 Pomeroy Pomeroy Toeamon 25 mi S
    F-27 932 5/16/1933 Naches Naches
    F-70 932 5/11/1934 Naches Cliffdale 23 mi S
    F-34 933 5/16/1933 Morton Morton
    NP-6 933 5/28/1935 Morton Packwood Chanapecoah Hot Springs 50 mi E
    F-15 934 5/19/1933 Darrington Darrington 1 mi S
    F-8 935 5/20/1933 Petores Winthrop
    F-17 935 5/21/1933 Seattle Port Angeles
    SP-11 935 5/11/1934 Kent Zenith Salt Water 4 mi E
    F-74 936 5/11/1934 Hoquiam Humptulips Hoquiam 30 mi N
    F-32 937 5/21/1933 Roslyn Roslyn
    F-60 937 11/5/1933 Port Townsend Sequin
    P-220 937 10/24/1934 Port Angeles Port Angeles Twin 30 mi SW
    Army-7 937 7/1/1935 Port Townsend Port Townsend Cape George At-R.H.
    P-220 937 6/30/1938 Port Angeles Port Angeles Twon 29 mi W
    P-223 937 10/10/1938 Doty Doty At-R.H.
    F-1 938 5/16/1933 Metaline Falls Metaline Falls
    S-234 938 4/9/1934 Hoquism Clearwater
    NP-? 938 6/27/1935 Ashford Longmire St. Andrews Creek 21 mi E
    F-20 938 4/22/1936 Shelton Hoodsport Lake Cushman 18 mi N
    SP-6 938 12/18/1937 Olympia Olympia Millersylvania 10 mi S
    P-40 944 5/15/1933 Stevenson Stebler
    F-43 944 4/11/1934 Stevenson Carson Hemlock 14 mi N
    P-39 945 5/19/1933 Yacolt Yacolt
    F-38 945 5/23/1934 White Salmon Guler
    F-55 945 10/13/1934 Stevenson Stevenson Rock Creek 4 mi NE
    SCS-8 945 10/22/1934 Goldendale Goldendale 1 mi NE
    F-19 946 5/21/1933 Seattle Quilcene
    NP-6 946 5/10/1934 Ashford Longmire
    F-19 946 10/18/1934 Port Townsend Quilcene Quilcene 25 mi SW
    F-20 947 5/21/1933 Shelton Hoodsport
    F-65 947 5/3/1934 Pateros Carlton Gold Creek 33 mi NW
    F-65 947 4/30/1935 Carlton Carlton Gold Creek 6 mi NW
    SP-1 947 7/12/1938 Orcas Olga Moran 14 mi W
    F-7 948 5/24/1933 Tomasket Tomasket
    SP-4 948 11/2/1933 Anacortes Anacortes
    NP-3 948 5/8/1935 Fairfax Fairfax Carbon River 12 mi E
    F-2 949 5/18/1933 Ruby Ruby
    SP-7 949 10/12/1933 Ft. George Wright Ft. George Wright Seven Mile 4 mi S
    F-10 950 5/22/1933 Pateros Pateros
    F-1 950 4/9/1934 Metaline Metaline
    F-82 950 6/3/1935 Orient Orient Pierre Lake 8 mi SW
    F-62 950 10/7/1939 Meyers Falls Kettle Falls Growden 18 mi W
    F-5 951 5/20/1933 Tomisbet Tomisbet
    F-13 951 5/7/1934 Rockport Marblemount
    P-203 951 10/18/1934 Lyman Lyman At-R.H.
    NP-1 961 4/28/1936 Ashford Longmire
    F-21 982 5/20/1933 Hequiam Hequiam
    P-205 982 10/13/1933 Kalama Kalama 8 mi W
    F-25 983 5/23/1933 Mineral Mineral
    F-29 983 4/28/1935 Leavenworth Leavenworth Icicle 5 mi SE
    NP-5 984 4/16/1934 Enumclaw Enumclaw White River 43 mi NE
    F-6 994 5/25/1933 Orient Orient
    NP-6 1209 5/9/1938 Packwood Longmire Chanapecosh Hot Springs 49 mi NE
    F-26 1228 6/18/1933 Naches Naches
    P-5 1229 6/19/1933 Enumclaw Enumclaw
    NP-6 1229 4/9/1934 Morton Packwood
    F-63 1229 4/15/1935 Republic Republic McMann Creek 10 mi SE
    F-51 1230 6/19/1933 Winton Leavenworth
    F-76 1230 4/8/1934 Roslyn Roslyn
    NP-4 1231 6/18/1933 Ashford Longmire
    P-2 1232 6/18/1933 Ashford Longmire
    SP-6 1232 10/26/1933 Olympia Olympia Millersylvania 12 mi SE
    SP-1 1233 11/13/1933 Olga Olga Moran 3 mi NW
    S-232 1234 6/20/1933 Yakima Wiley City
    SP-10 1238 5/20/1935 Colbert Colbert
    NP-207 1265 6/19/1933 Colville Colville
    P-215 1271 6/19/1933 Cusick Cusick
    SCS-12 1271 1/6/1939 Montesano Montesano
    BR-50 1297 5/17/1940 Easton Easton Kachess 15 mi NW
    NP-1 1302 10/24/1933 Bremerton Bremerton
    NP-2 1303 5/10/1934 Ashford Longmire
    P-215 1304 4/9/1934 Omsick Omsick
    SCS-2 1312 5/14/1934 Moscow, Idaho Moscow, Idaho
    P-213 1456 10/16/1937 Kelso Kelso Cathlamet 26 mi NW
    F-40 1456 8/21/1941 Stevenson Carson Hemlock 14 mi N
    S-223 1622 6/15/1933 LaGrand LaGrand
    P-212 1624 6/16/1933 Ryderwood Ryderwood
    F-101 1624 6/10/1935 Metaline Metaline Gypsy Meadows 16 mi E
    P-209 1626 6/15/1933 Shelton Shelton
    P-205 1627 6/15/1933 Seattle Port Townsend
    BR-50 1627 5/1/1936 Easton Easton Kachess 15 mi NW
    P-213 1628 1/13/1936 Kelso Kelson
    F-23 1629 6/15/1933 Lester Lester
    F-12 1630 6/26/1933 Bellingham Glacier
    F-24 1631 6/16/1933 Enumclaw Enumclaw
    F-62 1631 5/12/1936 Meyers Falls Kettle Falls Growden 18 mi W
    F-16 1632 6/26/1933 Seattle Port Angeles
    F-3 1632 11/6/1933 Chehalis Doty
    SP-3 1633 6/15/1933 Enumclaw Enumclaw
    SP-2 1633 11/26/1934 Winlock Winlock Lewis Clarke 10 mi E
    NP-6 1633 5/11/1936 Morton Packwood Chanapecoah Hot Springs 50 mi NE
    P-205 1634 6/16/1933 Lyman Lyman
    F-22 1635 -V 6/25/1933 Skykomish Skykomish 1 mi from camp
    NP-3 1635 -V 5/15/1934 Fairfax Fairfax
    F-13 1636 -V 6/16/1933 Rockport Rockport
    F-33 1638 6/26/1933 Wanatchee Wanatchee
    P-210 1638 11/13/1933 Seattle Belfair
    F-33 1639 6/25/1933 Morton Morton
    P-214 1640 6/16/1933 Butice Raymond
    P-220 1640 1/13/1936 Port Angeles Port Angeles Twin 30 mi W
    S-220 1641 6/21/1933 Yacolt Yacolt
    F-100 1641 4/30/1934 Ruby Ione
    SP-1 1647 1/13/1936 Olga Olga Moran 3 mi NW
    F-28 1650 5/12/1936 Naches Naches Tieton 23 mi W
    BR-42 1690 1/13/1936 Coulee Coulee Columbia 28 mi NE
    F-4 1745 6/19/1933 Boyda Boyda
    F-23 1745 10/27/1933 Lester Lester
    SCS-4 1761 1/15/1936 Walla Walla Walla Walla 5 mi E
    S-230 1923 -V 6/28/1933 Sultan Sultan 1 mi W
    F-85 1923 -V 12/2/1941 North Bend North Bend 4 mi N
    F-76 1925 -V 5/1/1935 Cleklum Roslyn Lake Cleklum at R.H.
    SCS-3 2519 6/30/1935 Dayton Dayton 1 mi E
    SCS-4 2520 6/10/1935 Walla Walla Walla Walla 5 mi E
    SCS-5 2521 6/10/1935 Pomeroy Pomeroy Garfield .5 mi W
    P-203 2609 1/13/1936 Lyman Lyman At-R.H.
    P-217 2642 6/14/1935 Vancouver Bks Vancouver Bks Washougal 34 mi E
    SP-13 2643 6/4/1935 Skamania Skamania Beacon Rock 2 mi W
    Army-4 2644 6/7/1935 Vancouver Bks Vancouver Bonneville 15 mi S
    Army-5 2645 6/25/1935 South Bend South Bend
    SCS-6 2649 6/27/1935 Yakima Yakima Soda Springs 33 mi SE
    SCS-8 2650 1/27/1935 Goldenfale Goldendale 1 mi NE
    Navy-1 2911 10/24/1933 Bremerton Bremerton Ostrich Bay 4 mi N
    F-65 2911 7/2/1935 North Bend North Bend 4 mi S
    NP-1 2912 5/6/1935 Ashford Longmire, Tahama Creek 9 mi E (Mt. Rainier)
    S-237 2913 4/22/1935 Valley Valley 2 mi E
    F-80 2913 10/23/1935 Thorp Thorp Taneum 11 mi NW
    SCS-2 2914 6/18/1935 Pullman Pullman 5 mi W
    F-12 2915 11/2/1934 Bellingham Bellingham Glacier 35 mi W
    F-16 2916 10/22/1934 Port Angeles Port Angeles Snider Ranger Station 50 mi SW
    P-201 2917 10/19/1934 Orting Electron
    AF-2 2917 8/21/1941 Ft. Lewis Dupont Dupont .5 mi W
    F-8 2918 5/4/1935 Pateros Pateros Boulder 65 mi N
    F-79 2918 6/28/1936 Okanogan Okanogan 25 mi NW
    F-33 2919 10/28/1934 Morton Packwood Packwood 38 mi NE
    F-34 2919 10/24/1935 Morton Randle Lower Cispus 31 mi E
    F-1 2920 4/15/1935 Metaline Falls Metaline Falls Sullivan Lake 6 mi SE
    F-13 2929 6/18/1935 Rockport Rockport Shagit 13 mi NE
    P-219 2929 4/28/1936 Rainier Rainier 2 mi W
    Navy-2 2935 -V 6/13/1935 Seattle Seattle Sand Point 12 mi NE
    SP-6 2935 -V 5/17/1936 Olympia Olympia Millersylvania 12 mi SE
    P-215 2936 -V 6/13/1935 Usk Usk .5 mi S
    Army-3 2941 8/1/1935 Ft. Lewis Ft. Lewis Roy 18 mi SE
    NP-2 2941 6/30/1938 Ashford Longmire Marada 22 mi E
    NP-1 2941 10/12/1938 Longmire Longmire Sunshine Point 7 mi W
    SCS-6 2942 8/12/1935 Yakima Yakima Soda Springs 33 mi SW
    SCS-11 2942 9/l/39 Waterville Waterville .5 mi N
    SCS-7 2944 8/21/1935 Cashmere Cashmere Mission Creek 8 mi SW
    F-38 2945 5/5/1936 White Salmon Gular Twin Buttes 53 mi N
    Army-6 2946 6/21/1935 Vancouver Bks Bancouver Bks Kill Pack 15 mi NE
    SP-15 3224 4/12/1936 Beverly Beverly Gingko Petrified Forest 9 mi N
    NP-5 3224 5/16/1938 Enumclaw Enumclaw White River 45 mi SE
    SCS-9 3224 10/31/1938 Snohomish Snohomish Camp Roosevelt 4 mi SE
    Army-5 3225 4/13/1936 South Bend South Bend Canby 40 mi S
    F-55 3267 10/11/1937 Carlton Carlton Gold Creek 6 mi NW
    F-8 3267 6/21/1940 Pateros Winthrop Boulder 65 mi NW
    SCS-10 3276 7/20/1939 Davenport Davenport Anderson 1 mi NE
    BR-66 3278 7/22/1938 Naches Cowiche Quinalult 43 mi N
    NP-10 3569 8/20/1941 Hoquiam Quinault Quinault 43 mi N
    P-205 3692 7/14/1938 Lyman Lyman East Skagit County
    F-77 3693 7/14/1938 Chelan Chelan Twenty-Five Mile Creek 25 mi NW
    F-78 3694 10/1/1938 Entiat Entiat 23 mi NW
    NP-6 3780 6/1/1937 Enumclaw Enumclaw White River
    F-20 4259 6/12/1935 Shelton Shelton Lake Cushman 18 mi NW
    F-25 4260 6/12/1935 Mineral Minearal 6 mi W
    F-28 4261 6/21/1935 Naches Naches Tieton 23 mi W
    F-77 4262 6/13/1935 Chelan Chelan Twenty-Five Mile Creek 23 mi NW
    F-78 4263 6/13/1935 Entiat Entiat 23 mi NW
    F-79 4264 6/17/1935 Okanogan Conconolly 25 mi NW
    F-80 4265 6/11/1935 Thorp Thorp Taneum 11 mi NW
    P-213 4267 6/26/1935 Kelso Cathamet Wahkiakum 27 mi NW
    P-219 4268 6/13/1935 Rainier Rainier 2 mi S
    SP-4 4269 6/11/1935 Anacortes Anacortes Rosario Beach 7 mi E
    SP-18 4270 6/10/1935 Bremerton Belfair Twanch 22 mi S
    SP-15 4271 6/12/1935 Beverly Beverly Gingko Petrified Forest 9 mi SE
    SP-16 4272 6/15/1935 Winton Leavenworth Wenatchee Lake 12 mi S
    Army-3 4274 6/18/1935 Dupont Ft. Lewis 2 mi W
    Army-4 4276 6/14/1935 Port Townsend Port Townsend Ft. Worden 2 mi N
    P-223 4277 6/12/1935 Doty Doty At-R.H.
    SCS-7 4279 6/12/1935 Cashmere Cashmere Mission Creek 8 mi SW
    F-102 4281 6/13/1935 Priest River, Idaho Priest River, Idaho Kalispell Creek 38 mi N
    NP-2 4728 6/21/1937 Ashford Longmire Marada 22 mi E
    BR-49 4752 6/12/1937 Naches Naches Clear Creek 38 mi W
    P-213 4766 10/13/1936 Kelso Cathlamet Cathlamet 26 mi NW
    P-220 4767 10/15/1936 Port Angeles Port Angeles Twin 29 mi W
    SP-1 4768 10/15/1936 Orcas Olga Moran 14 mi W
    F-28 4769 10/14/1936 Yakima Naches Tieton 32 mi NW
    P-203 4770 10/16/1936 Lyman Lyman At-R.H.
    P-60 4771 10/16/1936 Thorp Thorp Taneum 11 mi NW
    F-13 4772 10/16/1936 Rocksport Rocksport Skagit 13 mi NE
    F-77 4773 10/17/1936 Chelan Chelan Twenty-Five Mile Creek 25 mi NW
    F-39 4774 10/18/1936 Vancouver Bks Yacolt Sunset 37 mi NE
    NP-1 4786 5/10/1937 Ashford Longmire Tahoma Creek 9 mi E
    F-62 4799 10/16/1936 Meyers Falls Meyers Falls Growden 16 mi W
    SCS-12 5457 8/23/1941 Montesano Montesano 1 mi W
    F-89 5481 6/6/1938 White Salmon Trout Lake Skamania 40 mi N
    F-39 5481 10/13/1939 Vancouver Bks Yacolt Sunset 37 mi NE
    BR-58 5481 6/26/1941 Sunnyside Sunnyside 3 mi S
    F-1 5703 8/17/1941 Metaline Falls Metaline Falls Sullivan Lake 6 mi N
    SP-13 5709 10/18/1936 Skamania Skamania Beacon Rock 2 mi E
    NP-5 5710 6/16/1937 Packwood Packwood Chanapecosh Hot Springs 49 mi NE
    NP-8 6414 8/23/1941 Ashford Ashford Sunshine Point 81 mi E
    P-223 6419 7/12/1940 Doty Doty At-R.H.
    P-208 6420 7/12/1940 Elma Elma 2 mi N
    SCS-11 6435 7/26/1940 Waterville Waterville .5 mi N
    F-29 6436 7/26/1940 Leavenworth Leavenworth Icicle 5 mi SE
    F-77 6437 10/27/1941 Chelan Chelan Twenty-Four Mile Creek 23 mi NW
    P-219 6438 7/26/1940 Rainier Rainier 2 mi W
    F-16 6439 7/26/1940 Darrington Darrington 2 mi S
    BR-66 6459 10/24/1941 Naches Cowiche Cowiche 6 mi

    ———————————————————————-

    The research needed to find the KEY for identifying  WA State Historic CCC CAMPS was found on line in this order.

    Olympic NP: Historic Resource Study (Chapter 5)

    www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online…/hrs/chap5.htm
    National Park Service Oct 1, 2009 – Three of these programs had a paramount influence on the early development of Olympic National Park: The Civilian Conservation Corps …National Park Service
    —————————————————————-

    Robert Bulchis – James F. Justin Museum

    www.justinmuseum.com/oralbio/bulchisbio.html

    Biography of Robert Bulchis THE LOUELLA CCC CAMP NEAR SEQUIM,
    CCCMan, Company 937, Camp Easton, Wenatchee National Forest, Lake Cle Elum, Washington & Camp Louella, Sequim, Washington

    —————————————————————–

    JAMES F. JUSTIN CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS MUSEUM

    Unit Rosters and History Collection

    General Information Regional Information Company Rosters Camp Histories Company Histories Project Histories rights reserved.

    —————————————————————————

    Find Your Park – Centennial (U.S. National Park Service)

    GO FIND IT’S PAST…

    Things happen that should always be remembered?

    Our elected representatives in WA DC need to be reminded of CCC things that happened in WA State.


  • Go Find Your Park Sol Duc Hot Springs

    Go Find Your Park Sol Duc Hot Springs

    Olympic National Park is my park. It has been my park since 1944.

    THIS IS MY “INSIDE STORY” ON MY OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK
    INSIDE STORY is defined as knowing something from the inside out.

    INHOLDERS LIVED INSIDE OF NATIONAL PARKS

    Find Your Park

    findyourpark.com/

    MANY PARKS, MANY STORIES. Everyone finds their park in a different place and in a different way. These stories just might inspire you to find yours.

    SHARE YOUR STORY Post a picture or video of your experience on social media using the hashtag #FindYourPark. WE CAN’T WAIT TO SEE WHAT YOU DO!

    —————————————————————
    THIS IS MY INSIDE STORY how I found my park in 1944,

    better described as how my park found me, LIVING INSIDE  MY OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK WHEN I WAS THREE YEARS OLD.

    —————————————————

    Remember this “MY STORY”

    I have a brother and two sisters,

    THAT SHOULD SHARE THEIR STORIES AS WELL

    —————————————————

    Once Upon A Time in Olympic National Park

    My “inside store” is kind of like the original Grimm’s Brother  fairy tale

    You know the one… It starts off great..  but ends up with the Big Bad Wolf swallowing the grandmother whole and  the wolf eating Little Red Riding Hood..

    —————————————————

    Once Upon A Time in Olympic National Park
    My family, the George C. Rains Sr. family was living inside of the OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK as INHOLDERS at Sol Duc Hot Springs on 320 acres of private property in the fall of 1944.
    ————————————————————————-
    MY INSIDE STORY SHALL INCLUDE THE 71 YEAR HISTORY OF
    HOW I FIND MY PARK, OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK IN 2016.

    the bottom line
    IT IS A LONG STORY TO SHARE AND WILL REQUIRE A SERIES OF POSTINGS ON MY WEBSITE.
    ——————————————————————————-
    JUNE 29, 1938 UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES AND DEDICATED AND SET APART AS A PUBLIC PARK FOR THE BENEFIT AND ENJOYMENT OF THE PEOPLE AND SHALL BE KNOWN AS THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK…
    —————————————————————————-
    THIS IS MY DAD’S INSIDE STORY

    By GEORGE C. RAINS SR.

    THE WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE AND WHY OUR FAMILY WAS LIVING INSIDE OF THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK AT SOL DUC HOT SPRINGS ON 320 ACRES OF PRIVATE PROPERTY IN THE FALL OF 1944.

    LIVING THE AMERICAN DREAM

    In the year of 1944 I was employed at the Quillayute Naval Air Station doing plumbing maintenance work.
    While working there I became interested in the Sol Due Hot Springs area which involved 320 acres of private land.

    The Hot Springs resort property had remained idle for some period of time, and the more I thought about it, I asked myself -¬why not find out if the property was for sale and what the asking price was.

    I contacted Mrs. Mirza Martin in Seattle, Washington, then owner of the Sol Due Hot Springs to see if the property was for sale, and she informed me that it was. I had $500.00 in savings banks, and I thought I would use this money to obtain an option to purchase the Sol Due property. By putting up the $500.00 for option money, an arrangement was worked out with Mrs. Mirza Martin and her attorney to purchase the property for $70,000.00. Payments annually would be $7,500.00 including principle and interest until the contract was paid in full. Down. payment was $21,000.00.

    Money was very scarce during these times, and I had to hitchhike to Seattle to work out the deal with Mrs. Mirza Martin and her attorney.

    On one occasion I had to take the late last ferry from Seattle to Port Ludlow. It so happened no automobiles on the ferry were going to Port Angeles, so I started walking from Port Ludlow to Port Angeles. By daylight the next morning after walking all night I finally made it to Blyn, W A. A car finally came along and I got a ride to Port Angeles.

    I decided to form a corporation to handle the purchase matter of the Sol Due Hot Springs property. I hired Mr. W. F. Phillips, attorney, who was upstairs in the old Eagles Bldg. at the time, to draw up the incorporation papers. I hitchhiked to Olympia, Washington to see that the incorporation papers were properly filed. Hitchhiking from Olympia back to Port Angeles, I became stranded in Hoodsport and had to spend the night there.

    I finally located three other gentlemen and their wives who were interested in the purchase
    and operation of the Sol Due Hot Springs Resort property. I contacted my uncle and aunt
    in Seattle, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Hancock; Mr. and Mrs. O.B. Tully, and Mr. and Mrs.
    Roy Stafford. The four of us agreed to each subscribe to the purchase of 25 percent of the
    incorporation stock.

    The purchase was made and we started the resort operation in 1944.
    ———————————————————————————–
    THIS IS MY FAIRY TALE  INSIDE STORY how I found my park in 1944, as described above, how my park found me, living inside of my Olympic National Park when I was three years old.

    Arriving at Sol Duc Hot Springs in 1944, is one of my first memories, it was freezing cold and the ground was white…. I thought it was snow. Mom said it was just thick frost.

    So there I was with my family, at Sol Duc Hot Springs, in the Sol Duc Valley surrounded by my park.

    It was the beginning of my enchanted fairy tale childhood and it lasted for almost nine years.

    What an ideal way to spend my childhood, nine years, 1944-1953 living in a Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort rustic, charming, four room cabin built by the Martin brothers in 1921.

    How rustic and charming was our cabin? We had only cold running water, , a big wood range in the kitchen, with a screened wooden cooler for food, a bathroom with no bath tub (we took our baths and did our laundry in hot mineral in the basement of the store) We had another wood stove in the front room. The back porch was a woodshed with a kids swing. Electricity was provided by a waterwheel . We had no telephone and one radio with one radio station.

    How rustic was our cabin? Well, by today’s standards…pretty rustic…

    We had the wild bears that ripped off the screened wooden food cooler on our kitchen and dumped over garbage cans on a regular basis.

    we had raccoon’s, Bantam Chickens and SKUNKS living and fighting under our cabin.

    We had wild deer that took apples from our hands at our kitchen window.

    Our rustic Sol Duc cabin was surrounded by towering cottonwood, evergreens trees and an additional 87 rustic cabins built by the Martin brothers in 1921.
    —————————————————————————-

    As Dad said, Money was very scarce during these times…

    I don’t remember being poor, but I’m guessing we were poor and lived very frugally. Mom made all of our clothes, we got two pair of shoes a year, winter shoes in the fall and summer sandals and a new dress (one of my dresses was made out of silk from a World war II parachute) for EASTER. Making it do in World War two, we had skirts of raw silk too.

    In the summer, my winter shoes, with the toes cut out, because they were too small, became my CREEK SHOES.

    I didn’t own a store bought doll until I was eight years old. My two sisters and I shared one homemade doll called “Fatty”

    I don’t remember any toys? I don’t think they had been invented yet…

    We looked on the ground for and collected tax tokens, three of them equaled one penny.
    one penny would buy candy. (they were green plastic or aluminum)

    There was so much more, than being poor…  Like living a wonderful fairy tale.
    —————————————————–
    A bit of history WA State has always been TAXING
    Washington state caused a stir when their tax laws were passed and implemented on May 21, 1935. The US government and treasury department filed suit against the state of Washington claiming THE USE OF SALES TAX TOKENS AS AN ASSAULT ON US COINAGE. The governor of Washington refused to back down and the issue was tabled by the government.
    ——————————————————————————–

    Back to sharing my inside story, living inside my park.

    MY FAVORITE MEMORIES, OF PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

    It was unbelievably, wonder- full, delightful, wet, exciting and wild living on 320 acres of private property. (kind of like a fairy tale)

    A PRIVATE POOL
    In 1944, after my mother removed years and tons of accumulated leaves with a wheel barrow from the little pool, we had our own private small hot mineral swimming pool that winter and every winter after…

    —————–
    THE WONDERFUL DAYS OF SUMMER
    When Sol Duc Hot Springs was opened to and for PUBLIC USE
    Every rustic cabin was full
    The two swimming pools were full of splash happy people
    It was affordable for every working family
    Some family’s had a standing reservation for the same cabin every year
    Parking areas were full and over flowing
    The community kitchen and the surrounding area accommodated hundreds
    Campers Camped at the affordable Olympic National Park, Sol Duc Camp ground
    Fishing for trout in the Olympic National Park was a huge tourist attraction.

    ————————————————————————
    BACK THEN THERE WERE STILL FISH TO FISH FOR IN OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK
    Hikers hiked to the lakes to fish, Fisherman and fisher-boys fished in the Seven Lakes Basin (actually eight) Sol duc, Long, Lunch, Morgenroth, No Name, Clear, Round, and Lake No. 8.  Other lakes are encountered along the way are not considered part of “seven lakes” include Heart Lake, Deer Lake and Mink Lake.

    And, the old folks, woman and little kids stayed at Sol Duc Resort and went swimming…
    —————————————————————
    HOW DID THOSE TROUT EVERYBODY USED TO FISH FOR GET UP INTO THEM THAR HILLS?
    Great question, I just found the answer three days ago on Jan 18,2016 …
    During the summer of 1933 Snider CCC Camp enrollees worked with THE U.S. BUREAU OF FISHERIES AND THE STATE GAME COMMISSION TO PLANT 77,000 TROUT in the higher lakes and headwaters of streams in Clallam County THE CCC ASSISTED IN TRANSPORTING THESE FISH BY PACK HORSE TO REMOTE LOCATIONS IN THE OLYMPIC
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    AS INHOLDERS OUR FAMILY LIVED INSIDE OF THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK EVEN IN 1944 INHOLDERS WERE SUBJECT TO NATIONAL PARK RULES AND LAWS

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    I don’t know exactly how old I was when I realized that living inside my park had drawbacks. When I noticed the look on my parents faces when they heard the rumble of the Park Ranger, two gun Merrill’s car crossing the bridge?

    It only happened, you could only hear the rumble of a vehicle crossing the bridge and echoing through the valley, when Sol Doc Hot Springs was closed for the winter.

    What did I know and when? I was just a little kid…

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    When I was older, I knew why the Park Ranger, two gun Merrill showed up.. and I DID NOT LIKE HIM.

    It was illegal to shoot off fireworks in every National Park, even on your own 320 acres of private land.

    If we saw him, we knew he was on our private land to inspect, to see what was going on, Two Gun Merrill was there to force and/or enforce National Park laws and rules, including writing tickets for violations.

    Fun and games on the Fourth of July, you bet. There was only one park ranger. In the summer time there were lots of kids, even kids with cars. Kids like to shoot off fire crackers, this is the game of tag that we played with Two Gun Merrill. It was about a mile from behind the big pool to the community kitchen . So, we kids, would shoot off a bunch of fireworks behind the big pool… Two Gun Merrill would come running.. Then we kids would jump in the car and go down to the community kitchen and shoot off more fireworks. Back and forth, laughing our heads off.

    How old was I? just a kid… OLD ENOUGH TO REMEMBER.
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    When I was older, I kind of sort of figured out why the Park Ranger, two gun Merrill showed up in the winter time . It was illegal to shoot off guns/firearms in every National Park, even on your own 320 acres of private land.

    As Dad said, Money was very scarce during these times…
    Feeding a family of six was expensive.
    I knew what the sound of an echoing firecracker/gunshot would do.
    I never saw the illegal shooting or dressing of a deer, But I’m sure our family, by definition ate camp meat: illegal venison.
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    BACK WHEN THERE WERE STILL FISH TO FISH FOR IN OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

    BEFORE THE TROUT WERE ELIMINATE BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, TO PROTECT THE NOT SO ENDANGERED SPECIES LIKE LONG TOED SALAMANDERS AND FROGS

    Dad went fishing for trout up in the Seven Lake Basin.

    We had a walk in freezer up at the Sol Duc Store.
    As a kid, I ate a lot of free trout when I lived in my, Olympic National Park
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    HOW DID OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK RANGER, “TWO GUN MERRILL”

    GET HIS NAME? URBAN LEGEND HAS IT..
    THAT IN AN ATTEMPTED QUICK DRAW PRACTICE, HE ACCIDENTLY SHOT OFF ONE OF HIS TOES
    An urban legend is a secondhand story, alleged to be true
    and just plausible enough to be believed
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    The bottom line
    MY INSIDE STORY, ON MY OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK IS A LONG HISTORY TO SHARE AND WILL REQUIRE A SERIES OF POSTINGS ON MY WEBSITE.
    To be continued….