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  • Clallam County SMP Update

    Clallam County SMP Update

    CLALLAM COUNTY VESTED CITIZENS  HAVE A  VOICE

    A GOOD READ 624 SMP PUBLIC COMMENTS

    MARCH 30, 2015 SMP PUBLIC COMMENTS INCLUDE, CLALLAM COUNTY AFFECTED VESTED SHORELINE PRIVATE PROPERTY OWNERS, INVESTMENT PROPERTY OWNERS, LOCAL BUSINESS,  THE TIMBER INDUSTRY,

    IN PART, OTHERS HAVE THEIR VOICE TOO, PAID  GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES  NGO OUT OF TOWNERS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND COUNTY  AND THE TRIBES.

    2015 Comments

    032115 – PHewett

    032115 – PHewett

    032115 – PHewett

    032115 – PHewett

    032115 – PHewett

    031815 – PHewett

    031815 – KSpees

    2015 Comments

    031515 – KSpees

    031515 – PHewett

    031415 – KSpees

    031315 – KSpees

    030115 – PHewett

    030115 – PHewett

    030115 – PHewett

    022815 – PHewett

    SMP Comments under review by the Planning Commission:

    2015 Comments

    022715 – ForksCity

    022715 – BrandtPtOwners

    022715 – HSmyth

    022715 – SierraClub

    022715 – CGeer

    022715 – LPhelps

    022715 – RFletcher

    022715 – KNorman

    022715 – SBruch

    022715 – RBloomer

    022715 – RBloomer

    022715 – DStahler

    022715 – MDoherty

    022715 – SBogg

    022715 – RKnapp – JKT

    022715 – BLynette

    022715 – BLynette

    022715 – RPhreaner

    022615 – JLarson

    022515 – SierraClub

    022515 – TEngel

    022515 – AMatthay

    022515 – LPhelps

    022515 – KSpees

    022415 – DeptOfInterior

    022415 – TSimpson

    022415 – TFreeman

    022415 – BLake

    022415 – JCress

    022415 – Taylors

    022415 – EGreenleaf

    022315 – GBergner

    022015 – BBrown

    022015 – GBrown

    022015 – TRief

    022015 – RAmaral

    022015 – WCook

    022015 – DKalinski

    022015 – DFrascati

    022015 – JHelpenstell

    022015 – JFletcher

    022015 – CTilden

    022615 – PABA

    022015 – GJensen

    022015 – SWikstrom

    022315 – SBonner

    022215 – JElleot

    022115 – TSage

    022015 – KSpees

    022015 – KSpees

    022015 – KSpees

    022015 – KSpees

    021915 – DWahlgren

    2015 Comments

    021915 – NKoseff

    021915 – KDuff

    021915 – BVreeland

    021915 – CStrickland

    021915 – EStrickland

    021915 – GSmith

    021915 – DOE

    021915 – SGilleland

    021915 – LBowen

    021915 – HMeier

    021915 -DChong

    021915 – SAnderson

    021915 – OEC

    021915 – RHuntman

    021915 – BLynette

    021915 – CWeller

    021815 – WFlint

    021815 – SNoblin

    021815 – LNoblin

    021815 – PHewett

    021815 – KAhlburg

    021815 – EBowen

    021815 – PFreeborn

    021815 – TTaylor

    021815 – KGraves

    0218105 – GCase

    021815 – KCristion

    021815- SReed

    021815 – SLaBelle

    021815 – MGonzalez

    021815 – JAdams

    021815 – SKokrda

    021815 – KFarrell

    0211815 – MMazzie

    021815 -HKaufman

    021815 – MCrimm

    021815 – CCarlson

    021815 – SFarrall

    021815 – JWinders

    021815 – TErsland

    021815 – FWilhelm

    021815 – SPriest

    021815 – RHolbrook

    021815 – LLaw

    021815 – LHendrickson

    021815 – JMaddux

    021815 – DHagen

    021815 – MHinsdale

    021815- DWatson

    021815 – DWarriner

    021815 – DRigselie

    021815 – JBaymore

    2015 Comments

    021815 – Plauché & Carr LLP

    021815 – PHewitt

    021815 – JCollier

    021815 – JCollier

    021815 – CMiklos

    021815 – PMilliren

    021815 – RPhreaner

    021815 – BBurke

    021815 – GCrow

    021815 – CJohnson – NOTC

    021815 – CParsons – State Parks

    021815 – JMarx

    021715 – JDavidson

    021715 – RAmaral

    021715 – CGuske

    021715 – TTrohimovich – Futurewise

    021815 – DSchanfald

    021715 – Port of PA

    021715 – PMillren

    021715 – EWilladsen

    021615 – EChadd-OCA

    021315 – SLange

    021315 – CKalina

    021215 – RCrittenden

    021115 – RKaplan

    021115 – SScott

    021115 – PHewett

    020915 – RMantooth

    020615 – PRedmond

    020615 – CVonBorstel

    020515 – DHoldren

    020515 – JMichel

    020215 -DHoldren

    020515 – DHoldren

    020415 – SCahill

    020215 – CEvanoff

    013115 – MBlack

    013015 – SHall

    013015 – BConnely

    012715 – BGrad

    012715 – DGladstone

    012715 – BBoekelheide

    012715 – KWiersema

    012015 – JBettcher

    011615 – PHewitt

    011615 – ACook

    011415 – PLavelle

    011215 – PHewitt

    010915 – PHewitt

    010915 – RKnapp

    010715 – WSC

    2014 SMP Comments under review by the Planning Commission:

    2014 Comments

    122914 – MQuinn

    121614 – OCA

    111814 – PHewett

    111814 – PHewett

    111714 – PHewett

    091514 – PHewett

    081814 – PHewett

    SMP Comments on earlier drafts of the plan can found here

    ———————————————————————–

    SMP Legal Action Continues

    SMP Update fight moves forward – Great Pen Voice Letter by Gene Farr
    To: Karl Spees <76ccap@gmail.com>

    Gene Farr lives in Jefferson County.

    It is the same imposed govt taking without due process we are having in Clallam County. It will be the same in Grays Harbor County and over the whole state.

    I read the letter in the Peninsula Daily News. It was a little hard to follow.  This version is very clear and easy to follow.

    Is it the editing of the local paper or me?

    Karl Spees – Concerned American

    Thx Gene excellent letter.

    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

    Hope you all saw a slightly modified version this in the PDN today.  They added in Hood Canal Sand & Gravel as one of the litigants and changed the title to Shoreline program:

     

    SMP Legal Action Continues

     

    The PDN reported last week that the State Growth Management Hearing Board rejected appeals by the Olympic Stewardship Foundation, the local chapter of Citizen Alliance for Property Rights and others. These legal actions had been launched when Jefferson County adopted and the State Dept of Ecology approved a highly flawed and onerous update to the County’s Shoreline Master Program.

    You read that right. A county can’t adopt its own regulations to suit its local conditions. It must do what the State Department of Ecology wants in order to get the required approval.  Is that Constitutional?

    These legal appeals noted numerous constitutional, legal and procedural issues. The total was over 200 items, yet this Board of political appointees chose to not validate even one issue.  Now the legal action will move on to a real court of law.

    This SMP Update devalues shoreline property by making it less desirable.  It is now harder to develop, improve, repair or replace damaged shoreline property.  With the lower total value of county property as a tax base, the county then must increase property tax rates on all property to raise the same amount of funds.  This affects all property owners.

    CAPR and OSF are working on behalf of all property owners.  OSF is a local organization that believes “The best stewards of the land are the people who live on the land and care for their homes and property.”  We all should support these organizations.

    Gene Farr

     


  • SMP Public Comment #164

    I resubmit this SMP Public Comment as  #164

    FEMA AND OTHER POLICY SPECIFIC INSURANCE COVERAGE

    In answer to posted SMP Public Comment “so many questions”

    Why not help the 3300 shoreline private property owners?

    I have researched and documented, I have answers.

    You, Clallam County DCD have not responded to their posted question? YET?

    Pearl Rains Hewett

    —– Original Message —– Saturday, April 28, 2012 11:43 AM

    Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2012 11:43 AM
    Subject: FEMA AND OTHER POLICY SPECIFIC INSURANCE COVERAGE

    I submit this as my SMP comment

    Pearl Rains Hewett Trustee

    George C. Rains Sr. Estate

    Member SMP Advisory Committee

     

    FEMA AND OTHER POLICY SPECIFIC INSURANCE COVERAGE

    • snippets
    •  Some documentation is from MARCH 15, 2011, 6:57 P.M. ET
    • ·         1. FEMA  flood specific
    • ·         2. Earthquake specific
    • ·         3. DIC INSURANCE COVERAGE
    • ·         4. Generic specific homeowners insurance

     

    1. FEMA  flood specific

    The Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA) manages the NFIP.

    National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

    Flood coverage costs an average of $570 a year, up 4% from 2009. And those costs are expecting to keep rising, says Drew Woodbury, an equity analyst covering insurance at Morningstar.

    Over 10 years, flood insurance premiums could cost up to $27,340, for a high-risk home with $250,000 in coverage to rebuild the house and $100,000 to cover the contents, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency

    Drew Woodbury, an equity analyst covering insurance at Morningstar.

    On top of that, a proposal in Congress could also boost annual premiums by as much as 20% as part of a plan to overhaul the federal government’s flood insurance program, itself

    (FEMA )underwater by $18 billion.

    ———————————————————————————————————-

    My comment is, the wider the DOE SMP Clallam County flood plains,  the more private property owners will be required  to pay for this.

     If MITIGATION is your middle name? You are probably a government agency.

    Of course, CLALLAM COUNTY HOMEOWNERS can also avoid these expenses by moving to less disaster-prone areas. Individuals can research the country’s earthquake and FLOOD ZONES  for CHEAPER places to live.

    ——————————————————————————————————————————-

     2. Earthquake specific

     Earthquake insurance premiums jumped by as much as 58% in some regions, says Mike Chaney, commissioner of insurance for Mississippi.

    —————————————————————————-

     Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner.

    snippet

    Home policies typically don’t cover quakes

    While insurance policies with earthquake coverage are fairly easy to obtain, they have extremely high deductibles, high premiums and offer relatively little coverage, leaving some to wonder whether earthquake insurance is actually worth the price.

    “There is widespread belief among homeowners that earthquake insurance is included in their policy, but it almost never is. It’s an add-on that you have to buy. Most homeowners are just not covered,” says Rich Roesler to Insurancequote.com. Roesler is a spokesman for the Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner.

    ———————————————————————

    snippet

    California Earthquake Authority (CEA)

    CEA Premiums based on science, not profit.

    Per my research consultant, earth quakes are policy specific insurance.

     Earth movement, like slides, mud slides, caused by water or erosion, or your home sliding off of a Clallam County priority feeder bluff (PFB), are NOT Covered.

    See DIC insurance below.

    ———————————————————————————————————————

    3. DIC INSURANCE COVERAGE

    (Difference in Conditions Coverage)

    Per my research consultant, DIC insurance covers devastating, catastrophic damage to your private property. DIC gives you insurance coverage, that is not  covered on any of your other policy specific insurance policies.

    AN EXAMPLE OF DIC INSURANCE POLICY COVERAGE ON A CLALLAM COUNTY PRIORITY FEEDER BLUFF

    The insured house is on a Clallam County Priority Feeder Bluff

    The house is valued at $700,000.00

    The yearly premium for DIC insurance coverage on that property is $2600.00

    This DIC insurance policy DOES cover earth movement, like slides, mud slides, caused by water and/or erosion, AND it DOES insure your home if  it slides off of a Clallam County Priority Feeder Bluff (PFB)

     ———————————————————————————————————————

    4. Generic specific homeowners insurance

    My research consultant , advises you to read your homeowners policy, you will never know what is covered if you don’t read your policy.

    ———————————————————————————————————————

     

    • MARCH 15, 2011, 6:57 P.M. ET
    • Do You Need Disaster Insurance?

    By ANNAMARIA ANDRIOTIS

    The earthquake and tsunami in northern Japan has prompted homeowners everywhere to double-check their coverage. But those who decide that more coverage will help them sleep better may find an unpleasant surprise: Premiums are expected to spike.

    The costs of earthquake insurance and flood coverage were already climbing, even before the disaster in Japan (and that, analysts say, won’t help pricing either). Earthquake insurance premiums jumped by as much as 58% in some regions, says Mike Chaney, commissioner of insurance for Mississippi. They now costs anywhere from $100 to $3,000 annually depending on where you live. Flood coverage costs an average of $570 a year, up 4% from 2009. And those costs are expecting to keep rising, says Drew Woodbury, an equity analyst covering insurance at Morningstar.

    What’s driving the uptick? Insurance premiums move up after more claims are filed, and over the past few years U.S. homeowners have filed thousands of claims related to the series of hurricanes in the South and Midwest, says Chaney. Another jump in claims is expected next year if more devastating hurricanes and other natural disasters occur. On top of that, a proposal in Congress could also boost annual premiums by as much as 20% as part of a plan to overhaul the federal government’s flood insurance program, itself underwater by $18 billion.

    These higher premiums come just as natural disasters are happening more frequently, says David Neal, director at Oklahoma State University’s Center for the Study of Disasters and Extreme Events. There is now a 50% chance that at least one major hurricane will hit the East Coast this year, up from 31% historically, according to a study from Colorado State University. Earthquakes are also becoming more common: On average, 15 magnitude-7 earthquakes occur worldwide each year, says Dr. Harley Benz, a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey. But in 2010, that number spiked to 21, and already this year there have been seven, according to the USGS.

    Not every homeowner needs the extra coverage. But while basic homeowners’ insurance usually protects again fire and lighting, it often doesn’t cover floods, earthquakes and other natural disasters. Consumers instead need to purchase additional policies. One thing to consider, say experts: Do you stand to lose more paying premiums every year or saving that money to possibly pay for repairs should a disaster occur? Over 10 years, flood insurance premiums could cost up to $27,340, for a high-risk home with $250,000 in coverage to rebuild the house and $100,000 to cover the contents, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which runs the National Flood Insurance Program. The typical cost to repair a basement after a flood of six inches is about $25,000, not including the cost of replacing furniture, appliances or belongings, according to FEMA.

    Of course, homeowners can also avoid these expenses by moving to less disaster-prone areas. Individuals can research the country’s earthquake and flood zones for safer places to live. Also, before moving, check with a lender; most will tell borrowers they’re moving into a high-risk flood zone and make sure they sign up for flood insurance.

     


  • SMP Public Comment #163

    I resubmit this as my SMP Public Comment #163

    Buying and selling non-conforming homes

    SMP critical areas, setbacks, buffers, wetlands and NON-CONFORMING property.

    Previously posted SMP Public Comment #254 Wednesday, May 02, 2012 11:13 AM

    In answer to posted SMP Public Comment “so many questions”

    Why not help the 3300 shoreline private property owners?

    I have researched and documented, I have answers.

    You, Clallam County DCD have not responded to their posted question? YET?

    Pearl Rains Hewett

    —————————————————————————————-

     snippet, full text below

    What you may want to be concerned about is the decrease in value of the waterfront lots, parcels with wetlands and future non-conforming underdeveloped properties and their subsequent impact to not only you directly, but also to our tax rolls and the revenues that our county services depend upon.

    ———————————————————–

    A very brief overview of Tort Law

    The prima facie case for negligence requires:

    Duty is owed to the plaintiff by the defendant
    Breach of the Duty
    Causation: The defendant caused the harm to occur.
    Damages: The plaintiff suffers harm.

    ——————————————————————-

     General Advice: In the old days, we use to advise clients that waterfront homes and anything with a dock would appreciate at the highest rate in our market. We would say “buy waterfront, and lots of it”.

    Unfortunately, due to the Critical Area Ordinance update we have had to change what we recommend. We now must caution buyers on the purchase of waterfront lots, parcels with wetlands, and those homes or cabins that are underdeveloped and may become non-conforming should the update increase the buffers to undesirable levels and make a high percentage of the buffer “no touch”. Homes that are already developed to their highest and best use, such as a large waterfront home, with guest house and dock, in all likelihood should increase in value since you may not be able to create those improvements or have those views in the future. As those homes are already in place, you won’t be concerned over the non-conforming growth restrictions as contained in the current regulations; however, the next owner may have wanted to expand the home.

    ————————————————————
    Posted on line as SMP Public comment #254

    I would like to comment and make a suggestion on future DOE SMP questionnaires used at Clallam County Public Forums.  I suggest the following questions, in order, by priority.

    1. Are you attending this forum to find out how your private property will be affected by the proposed SMP Update?

    2. Are you concerned about the proposed marine and freshwater, critical areas, shoreline setbacks and buffer zones?

    3. Do you want to know  the percentage of your property that will become non-conforming under the proposed setbacks and buffers?

    4.Do you know the difference between grandfathered and non-conforming?

    5.Do you want to know what affect the term non-conforming will have on your property?

    6. Are you concerned about how the term non-conforming will affect your property value?

    7. Do you want more information on the mitigation process for non-conforming homes/property?

    ———————————————————————————————

    3/01/15 PLUS THIS ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

    Buying and selling DOE SMP non-conforming shoreline property?

    Documentation on policy from local lending institutions?

    RESEARCH

    1. 5/ 01/12  I spent 45 minutes being transferred, from one person to another, and finally spoke to a loan officer, at my bank(of 30 years). He was sympathetic, he used to live in Port Townsend. He had information on non-conforming loans, but no information on loans on non-conforming property. He suggested I talk with the president of my local bank branch.

    2. 5/02/12  I drove to and talked with the local bank manager. There is only one loan officer for this bank, in this area, located at the Sequim Branch.

    3. 5/02/12  I drove from PA to Sequim and the loan officer and I talked for over 30 minutes. She was very helpful. She lives on a local marine bluff.

    4. 5/03/12 called another local bank loan officer indicated she was not qualified to answer my question. I was given the bank’s Mortgage Director’s phone number.

    5. 5/04/12 Mortgage director returned my call, after a 30 minute conversation. She said only the information recorded with the auditor’s office shows up on applications for home loans.

     

    Bottom line Q’s and A’s

    I asked if she could give me anything in writing regarding the buying and selling of DOE SMP non-conforming shoreline property?

    The bank’s Mortgage Director answer was, not without writing it up, sending it to corporate headquarters and having it reviewed and approved by their attorneys.

     

    GENERIC STATEMENTS

    Home mortgages are never black and white.

    DOE SMP  setbacks and buffers ARE.

    Mitigation is always a grey area.

    Times have changed, with all of the foreclosures and bank ownership of homes, all applications for home loans are under more scrutiny.

    Appraiser’s may RED FLAG the appraisal for your home loan application.

    ————————————————————————————————

    BACK TO THE POSTED  online  SMP Public Comment #254 (full text)

    Wednesday, May 02, 2012 11:13 AM

    To: zSMP; sgrey@co.Clallam.wa.us; Miller, Sheila Roark

    Cc: Karl Spees; Jay Petersen; McEntire

    , Jim; lois Perry; marv chastain; harry bell

    Subject:

    REAL ESTATE MARKET VALUE OF NON-CONFORMING PROPERTY

     

    TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

    I submit this as my comment on the SMP Update

    Pearl Rains Hewett Trustee

    George C. Rains Sr. Estate

    Member SMP Advisory Committee

     

    The good news is

    There are compliments all around for staff and consultants regarding the handling of the SMP Advisory Committee meetings.

    Thank you for compiling and disclosing the statistics on the setbacks and buffers on the marine SED  priority feeder bluffs.

     

    The bad news is

    SAN JUAN ISLAND REAL ESTATE MARKET SUMMARY (full text follows)

    Spring 2012 Issue, SMP critical areas, setbacks, buffers, wetlands and NON-CONFORMING property.

    What you may want to be concerned about is the decrease in value of the waterfront lots, parcels with wetlands and future non-conforming underdeveloped properties and their subsequent impact to not only you directly, but also to our tax rolls and the revenues that our county services depend upon.

     

     

    I would like to comment and make a suggestion on future DOE SMP questionnaires used at Clallam County Public Forums.  I suggest the following questions, in order, by priority.

     

    1. Are you attending this forum to find out how your private property will be affected by the proposed SMP Update?

    2. Are you concerned about the proposed marine and freshwater, critical areas, shoreline setbacks and buffer zones?

    3. Do you want to know  the percentage of your property that will become non-conforming under the proposed setbacks and buffers?

    4.Do you know the difference between grandfathered and non-conforming?

    5.Do you want to know what affect the term non-conforming will have on your property?

    6. Are you concerned about how the term non-conforming will affect your property value?

    7. Do you want more information on the mitigation process for non-conforming homes/property?

     

    SAN JUAN ISLAND REAL ESTATE MARKET SUMMARY

    Merri Ann Simonson

    Managing Broker

    Sales Manager

    simonson@sanjuanislands.com

    General Advice: In the old days, we use to advise clients that waterfront homes and anything with a dock would appreciate at the highest rate in our market. We would say “buy waterfront, and lots of it”.

    Unfortunately, due to the Critical Area Ordinance update we have had to change what we recommend. We now must caution buyers on the purchase of waterfront lots, parcels with wetlands, and those homes or cabins that are underdeveloped and may become non-conforming should the update increase the buffers to undesirable levels and make a high percentage of the buffer “no touch”. Homes that are already developed to their highest and best use, such as a large waterfront home, with guest house and dock, in all likelihood should increase in value since you may not be able to create those improvements or have those views in the future. As those homes are already in place, you won’t be concerned over the non-conforming growth restrictions as contained in the current regulations; however, the next owner may have wanted to expand the home. What you may want to be concerned about is the decrease in value of the waterfront lots, parcels with wetlands and future non-conforming underdeveloped properties and their subsequent impact to not only you directly, but also to our tax rolls and the revenues that our county services depend upon.

    Spring 2012 Issue

    Real Estate News—Page Two