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  • Category Archives Preserving our Park
  • Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington

    This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted February 12, 2016.

    HISTORIC PLACES IN OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

    15 Elwha River Hydroelectric Power Plant
    Elwha River Hydroelectric Power Plant
    December 15, 1988
    (#88002741)
    N end of Lake Aldwell
    48°05′42″N 123°33′18″W
    Port Angeles
    18 Glines Canyon Hydroelectric Power Plant
    Glines Canyon Hydroelectric Power Plant
    December 15, 1988
    (#88002742)
    N end of Lake Mills at Elwha River
    48°00′11″N 123°35′54″W
    Port Angeles

    Things happen that should always be remembered.

    ARE YOU AS SHOCKED AS I AM? Who knew that our Elwha River and Glines Canyon Hydroelectric power plants were placed on on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington on Dec 15, 1988?

    UNBELIEVABLE… Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    Built in 1910 and 1926 respectively, the Elwha dam (108 feet high) and Glines Canyon dam (210 feet high) provided the only power to a lumber mill town called Port Angeles, situated on the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

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    Just, a town called Port Angeles? Port Angeles WA has been our Rains family town for 96 years.

    Find Your park tell your story. Olympic National Park is my park, this is a continuation of my inside story, I have known the Olympic National Park from the inside out for over 70 years. I was an INHOLDER in at Sol Duc Hot Springs inside the  Olympic National Park in 1944 and I still am an ONP INHOLDER inside the park, on the Elwha River,  Sat Feb 13, 2016.

    Forget Me Not

    Things happen that should always be remembered.

    Who remembers? Who Cares?

    History is written by the victors. – Winston Churchill..

    ————————————————————————-

    SO WHAT HAPPENED TO OUR OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARKS LAKES AND HISTORIC ELWHA RIVER HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANTS?

    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    So, the tribes, along with environmental groups, began petitioning for restoration of the Elwha and its salmon runs. In 1992, their petitions were heard and President George H.W. Bush signed legislation to allow the federal government to buy the dams and begin conducting studies regarding the feasibility of their removal.

    Bush signed legislation… a document of historical interest, it’s only 8 pages long.

    January 3, 1992 H.R.4844 An Act To restore Olympic National Park and the Elwha River ecosystem and fisheries in the State of Washington.

    For local tribes and environmental advocates, it was time to go to work.

    Hundreds of environmental studies later, the decision to remove the dams was finalized.

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    The Supplemental EIS lists the proposed flood mitigation contained in the 1996 Final Environmental Impact Statement and the proposed changes to that list.

    You can find the Supplemental EIS  a document of historical interest, it’s only 366 pages long at:

    http://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/loader.cfm?csModule=security/getfile&PageID=136240

    THEN WHAT HAPPENED TO OUR OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARKS LAKES AND HISTORIC POWER PLANTS?

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    World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After …

    news.nationalgeographic.com/…/140826-el…
    National Geographic Society

    Aug 27, 2014 – “Thirty years ago, when I was in law school in the Pacific Northwest, removing the dams from the Elwha River was seen as a crazy, wild-eyed …

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    Find Your park tell your story. Olympic National Park is my park.

    Who knew the Olympic National Park Altair and Elwha River’s Campgrounds Community Kitchens  were placed on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington on July 13, 2007?

    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    The Campground Community kitchens were built by the CCC Elwha Camp #935, project 60 in 1933.

     

    2 Altair Campground Community Kitchen
    Altair Campground Community Kitchen
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000732)
    Approx. 4 mi. S of US 101
    48°00′42″N 123°35′30″W
    Port Angeles

    It’s a Place its a thing

    12 Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
    Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000735)
    3 miles south of U.S. Route 101 in Washington
    48°01′39″N 123°35′13″W
    Port Angeles

    Olympic National Park is my park

    13 Elwha Ranger Station
    Elwha Ranger Station
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000716)
    Approximately 3 miles southeast of WA 101 on the Olympic Hot Springs Rd.
    48°01′00″N 123°35′27″W
    Port Angeles

    The Olympic Hot Springs Road is my road.

    THIS ROAD WAS THE HISTORIC “GATEWAY TO THE OLYMPICS”

    Who remembers? Who Cares? History is written by the victors. – Winston Churchill..

    The National Park Service,  HISTORICALLY rewrites, renames, redirects, obscures, excludes, deletes and destroys,  much of the HISTORY of the Olympic National Park

    Things happen that should always be remembered. in 1909 The Olympic Hot Spring Resort  was a flourishing tourist destination.

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    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    Repairs and widening of 22 miles of the Olympic Hot Spring Road was done by  the CCC Elwha Camp #935, project 60 in 1933-1934.

    Access to the Olympic National Park interconnected ROAD AND TRAIL SYSTEM belongs to all of us.

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    The Sol Duc River Shelter?

    The renamed as Canyon Creek Shelter, renumbered as #07000712, coordinates missing? image missing? Approximate distance from wherever? is and was  the Sol Duc Shelter.

    The Sol Duc River Shelter was my Shelter inside the Olympic National park in 1944.

    Who remembers? Who Cares? History is written by the victors. – Winston Churchill..

    The National Park Service,  HISTORICALLY rewrites, renames, redirects, obscures, excludes, deletes and destroys,  much of the HISTORY of the Olympic National Park

    30 North Fork Sol Duc Shelter Upload image
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000725)
    Approx. 9.5 mi. from North Fork Sol Duc Trailhead
    47°59′56″N 123°45′42″W
    Port Angeles
    5 Canyon Creek Shelter
    Canyon Creek Shelter
    July 13, 2007
    (#07000712)
    Approximately .9 miles north of the Upper Sol Duc River Trailhead
    Coordinates missing
    Port Angeles

    Find Your Park Forget Me Not

    It’s a Place… it’s in the Olympic National Park, tell your story, things happen that should never be forgotten.

    to be continued…

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    There are 49 properties and districts listed on the National Register in Clallam County.

    This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Clallam County, Washington, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.[1]


  • Find Your Park Open Doors Remove Barriers

    Find your park. It’s your place, It’s your thing.

    It’s a Fact. The Federal Parks belong to all of us.

    Open Doors,  Remove barriers, Tell your story, Make a difference.

    On Mon Feb 8, 2016 2:30PM there was a meeting  at Olympic National Park Headquarters regarding the closure of the Olympic Hot Springs Road to all public and private access. I told my story, expressed my concerns on the economic impact to the local community and asked my questions.

    Four of my government representatives listened, responded and answered questions

    ——————————————————————

    Clallam County Commissioner  Bill Peach opened the door.

    As required in the ERFO guidelines, under the  program, Federal agencies and local government entities have the responsibility to perform emergency repairs, shift project and program priorities, give emergency relief work prompt attention and priority over non-emergency work, and assist the Office of Federal Lands Highway in its stewardship and oversight responsibilities.

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    Three, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, Olympic National Park local Representatives  attended the meeting.

    M. Sarah Creachbaum
    Superintendent, of the Olympic National Park

    Lisa Turecek, PE
    Chief of Facilities Management

    Brian Winter
    Elwha River Project Manager

    I was delighted to have the opportunity to meet with them face to face.

    I was delighted at the conclusion of the meeting, strictly based on my understanding of the contents of the meeting, of the expeditious actions that have been taken and will be taken in the future.

    —————————————————————

    This comment is intended to inform others, to share for the record, the information from the notes I took at the Feb 8, 2016 meeting.

    I was delight with the positive response from M. Sarah Creachbaum
    Superintendent, of the Olympic National Park.

    Sarah showed genuine concern for the economic well being of local people, she cares about the local people, they are her people.

    When I suggested that she do a news release to inform we the concerned people

    Using  the  progress reported by Lisa,  the expeditious steps taken with the  ERFO Program for the reopening the Olympic Hot Springs Road to provide access to the ONP public tourist, and private property owners.

    You know, like a message of hope from the Superintendent, of the Olympic National Park, for the economic future of  the local business people, for increased employment… for the the rush of  tourism created by the removal of the dams.

    Sarah agreed to do a press release…

    And I was delighted.

    ——————————————————————–

    However, after hours of more in-depth research, done after the meeting, included  in this comment,  that provides additional documentation……

    Being delighted, and staying delighted with the ONP, are two different things! This is not my first rodeo with the Olympic National Park Service.

    Indeed, if I have made unintentional errors in this comment, I will do an immediate update on this website and  a retraction immediately.

    But for the record here goes… Taken from the notes I took at the Feb 8, 2016 meeting.

    Lisa Turecek, PE
    Chief of Facilities Management

    The expeditious Steps she has taken with the  ERFO Program to reopen the Olympic Hot Springs Road

    Nov. 17, 2015 The Olympic Hot Springs Road (and trails) had a disastrous flooding event

    Nov 2015 file a notice notice of intent for Emergency Relief Program for funding

    Dec 2015 file a formal notice notice for Emergency Relief Program for funding

    Jan 2016 received  recognition of Elwha River disastrous flooding event

    Jan-Feb? completed? damage survey required for ERFO amount of funding?

    Note It was stressed by Lisa and Brian  that the ERFO  was for roads only?

    ———————————————————————-

    Additional  research and documentation on ERFO funding for trails

    To be eligible for ERFO funding under 23 U.S.C. 125(e)(2), trails and transit systems must be included in the inventory of Tribal or Federal Lands Transportation Facilities. Trails included in the inventory should provide access to high-use recreation sites or Federal economic generators.

    ————————————————————–

    Bill asked if the Olympic Hot Springs Road would be open by the 4th of July?

    ——————————————————————–

    Note It was stressed by Lisa and Brian  that the Army Corp of Engineers must, be given time, up to 60 days? Because a 100 foot bridge ( at  undisclosed location?)  must be built.

    When will the road be reopened to  public and private access?

    Lisa’s guesstimated was four months from the time that construction was permitted to start.

    ——————————————

    Brian Winter
    Elwha River Project Manager

    That tentative plans to proceed shall required NOAA consultation under section 7, the endangered species act (ESA) Not necessarily additional restrictions, just consultation?

    ———————————————-

    Which led to my questions to Brian Winter Elwha River Project Manager on the funding and planning for the removal of the Elwha Dams.

    I was just asking? Just saying? In particular…

    The ONP budget $$$ and plans for removal of the Elwha dams in the Elwha district included flood barriers and restoration (among other things)

    The ONP budget and plans for removal of the Elwha dams in the Elwha district included
    flood barriers for the tribes?

    I asked Flood barriers? only to protect the Elwha tribe? Flood barriers? only protect tribal land?

    I asked Brian to correct me if I was wrong.

    He did. emphatically…

    Flood barriers were provided for  the tribes and private property on the West side of the mouth of the Elwha River and And, flood barriers were provided for private homes down stream from the dam removals.

    —————————————————–

    I am certain, that…
    Flood barriers were in place to protect all tribal historic heritage sites and
    to all protect tribal access, roads and trails
    ————————————————————————-

    Feb 9, 2016 I’m asking for a response from  Brian on the following unanswered questions?

    In particular…Funding and planning for the dams removal provided?
    No flood barriers in the Elwha district to protect the best interest of citizens?
    the, over 300,000 million national park visitors
    No flood barriers? to protect citizens public and private access to roads and trails?
    No flood barriers? to protect citizens public and private property?

    ——————————————————————

    I repeat for clarification, Brian’s emphatic answer…

    In addition to the tribes protection, some private property and homes were given flood barriers in the funding and planning of the Elwha dam removals

    Flood barriers were provided for  the tribes and private property on the West side of the mouth of the Elwha River and And, flood barriers were provided for private homes down stream from the dam removals.

    ———————————————————————-

    I’m asking for a response from  Brian on the following unanswered questions?

    Funding and planning for the dams removal provided?
    No flood barriers? to protect citizens public and private land, trails, campgrounds campsites and facilities?
    No flood barriers? to protect citizens historic heritage sites?
    No flood barriers? to protect private property owners property?
    ——————————————————————————–

    I directed additional questions to Brian Winter, as the  Elwha River Project Manager on the funding and planning for the removal of the Elwha Dams.

    The ONP budget $$$ and plans for removal of the Elwha dams in the Elwha district included restoration (among other things)

    I received no response to these questions from Brian.

    Elwha River restoration? Just restoration and planting of native plants?

    No restoration $$$ for public and private roads and trails?
    No restoration $$$ for access into Elwha district the Olympic National Park?
    No restoration $$$ for public and private campgrounds campsites and facilities?
    No restoration for citizens Elwha district historic heritage sites?
    ————————————————————–
    Did the ONP budget and plans for removal of the Elwha dams in the Elwha district included or require mitigation and compensation $$$ for the flood damage caused to the private landowner campsite’s, inside the park, downstream from the dam removal?
    —————————-

    FLH > Programs > Emergency Relief for Federally Owned …

    flh.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/erfo/
    Federal Highway Administration

    Dec 4, 2015 – Funds for the ERFO Program are provided from the Highway Trust Fund and the General Fund through the Emergency Relief Program for …

    snippet full text below

    Applicants are expected to prioritize the repair of ERFO projects that are in the public’s best interest, based on available funds. Federal agencies and local government entities have the responsibility to perform emergency repairs, shift project and program priorities, give emergency relief work prompt attention and priority over non-emergency work, and assist the Office of Federal Lands Highway in its stewardship and oversight responsibilities.

    ————————————————————————————-

    Guidance – Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads …

    https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/…/guideflerfo
    Federal Highway Administration

    Dec 11, 2012 – Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) MAP-21 … To be eligible for ERFO funding under 23 U.S.C. 125(e)(2), trails and transit …

    snippet full text below

    To be eligible for ERFO funding under 23 U.S.C. 125(e)(2), trails and transit systems must be included in the inventory of Tribal or Federal Lands Transportation Facilities. Trails included in the inventory should provide access to high-use recreation sites or Federal economic generators.

    ——————————————————————-

    full text Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO)

    On December 4, 2015, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act of 2015 (the “FAST Act” or “Highway Funding Act”) was signed into law replacing MAP-21. We are in the process of revising the information on this page to address this new legislation.

    The Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads Program, or ERFO Program, was established to assist federal agencies with the repair or reconstruction of tribal transportation facilities, federal lands transportation facilities, and other federally owned roads that are open to public travel, which are found to have suffered serious damage by a natural disaster over a wide area or by a catastrophic failure.

    The intent of the ERFO program is to pay the unusually heavy expenses for the repair and reconstruction of eligible facilities.

    The ERFO program is not intended to cover all repair costs but rather supplement Federal Land Management Agency (FLMA) repair programs. Repairs are classified as either emergency or permanent repairs.

    Emergency repairs are those repairs undertaken during or immediately after a disaster to restore essential traffic, to minimize the extent of damage, or to protect the remaining facilities. Prior approval is not required, however all other eligibility requirements of the program still apply.

    Permanent repairs are those repairs undertaken after the occurrence of the disaster to restore facilities to their pre-disaster conditions. Prior approval is required.

    The ERFO program provides assistance to other federal agencies whose roads meet the definition of “open to public travel” such as: Bureau of Reclamation; Department of Energy (previously under jurisdiction of the Bureau of Reclamation, i.e., owned by the Western Area Power Association); Department of Defense (Military Installation roads); and Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (Defense Access roads).

    The Federal share payable for the repair of tribal transportation facilities, federal lands transportation facilities, and public roads on federal lands is 100 percent under the ERFO Program. Funds for the ERFO Program are provided from the Highway Trust Fund and the General Fund through the Emergency Relief Program for Federal-aid Highways. ERFO funds are not to duplicate assistance under another Federal program or compensation from insurance, cost share, or any other source.

    The Office of Federal Lands Highway is responsible for efficient and effective management of public funds entrusted by Congress and for ensuring that the ERFO Program is administered consistent with laws, regulations, and policies.

    Applicants are expected to prioritize the repair of ERFO projects that are in the public’s best interest, based on available funds. Federal agencies and local government entities have the responsibility to perform emergency repairs, shift project and program priorities, give emergency relief work prompt attention and priority over non-emergency work, and assist the Office of Federal Lands Highway in its stewardship and oversight responsibilities.

    Contact Information listed below

    ——————————————————————-

    full text

    Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads

    (ERFO) MAP-21 Program Guidance

    DOT Logo
    U.S. Department of
    Transportation
    Federal Highway
    Administration

    Memorandum

    Subject: Information: Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) MAP-21 Program Guidance Date: December 11, 2012
    From: Joyce A. Curtis
    Associate Administrator for Office of Federal Lands Highway
    In Reply Refer To: HFL-1
    To: Federal Lands Highway Division Engineers

    This purpose of this memorandum is to provide guidance for changes to the Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads (ERFO) program.

    Section 1107 of the “Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act” (MAP-21), enactedJuly 6, 2012, amended 23 U.S.C. 125 “Emergency Relief” as follows:

    • (e) TRIBAL TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES, FEDERAL LANDS TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES, AND PUBLIC ROADS ON FEDERAL LANDS.-
      • (1) DEFINITION OF OPEN TO PUBLIC TRAVEL.-In this subsection, the term ‘open to public travel’ means, with respect to a road, that, except during scheduled periods, extreme weather conditions, or emergencies, the road is open to the general public for use with a standard passenger vehicle, without restrictive gates or prohibitive signs or regulations, other than for general traffic control or restrictions based on size, weight, or class of registration.
      • (2) EXPENDITURE OF FUNDS.-Notwithstanding subsection (d)(1), the Secretary may expend funds from the emergency fund authorized by this section, independently or in cooperation with any other branch of the Federal Government, a State agency, a tribal government, an organization, or a person, for the repair or reconstruction of tribal transportation facilities, Federal lands transportation facilities, and other federally owned roads that are open to public travel, whether or not those facilities are Federal-aid highways.
      • (3) REIMBURSEMENT.-
        • (A) IN GENERAL.-The Secretary may reimburse Federal and State agencies (including political subdivisions) for expenditures made for projects determined eligible under this section, including expenditures for emergency repairs made before a determination of eligibility.
        • (B) TRANSFERS.-With respect to reimbursements described in subparagraph (A)-
          • (i) those reimbursements to Federal agencies and Indian tribal governments shall be transferred to the account from which the expenditure was made, or to a similar account that remains available for obligation; and
          • (ii) the budget authority associated with the expenditure shall be restored to the agency from which the authority was derived and shall be available for obligation until the end of the fiscal year following the year in which the transfer occurs.

    Section 1508 of MAP-21 amended 23 U.S.C. 120 “Federal share payable” as follows:

    • (e) EMERGENCY RELIEF.-The Federal share payable for any repair or reconstruction provided for by funds made available under section 125 for any project on a Federal-aid highway, including the Interstate System, shall not exceed the Federal share payable on a project on the system as provided in subsections (a) and (b), except that-
      • (1) the Federal share payable for eligible emergency repairs to minimize damage, protect facilities, or restore essential traffic accomplished within 180 days after the actual occurrence of the natural disaster or catastrophic failure may amount to 100 percent of the cost of the repairs;
      • (2) the Federal share payable for any repair or reconstruction of Federal land transportation facilities, Federal land access transportation facilities, and tribal transportation facilities may amount to 100 percent of the cost of the repair or reconstruction;

    Effective October 1, these provisions will be implemented as follows:

    • In addition to tribal transportation facilities and Federal lands transportation facilities, other Federally owned roads that are “open to public travel”, whether or not those facilities are Federal-aid highways, are eligible for ERFO funds. This provides ERFO eligibility to Federally owned roads that may not meet the definition of a tribal transportation facility or a Federal lands transportation facility. The intent of this provision is to focus the limited ERFO funds on those facilities that are surfaced and maintained for standard passenger vehicles. Therefore, roads passable ONLY by high-clearance vehicles are not eligible for ERFO under this provision. High clearance roads no longer eligible for ERFO may be eligible for assistance under FEMA or other programs.
    • To be eligible for ERFO funding under 23 U.S.C. 125(e)(2), trails and transit systems must be included in the inventory of Tribal or Federal Lands Transportation Facilities. Trails included in the inventory should provide access to high-use recreation sites or Federal economic generators.
    • Section 125(e)(3) of title 23, United States Code, was amended to add language affecting the reimbursement to Federal Land Management Agencies (FLMAs). When FLMAs use their own funds for emergency and permanent repairs, ERFO funds can go back to the FLMAs original account or a similar account and remains available for obligation. Additionally, the budget authority shall be restored to the agency from which the authority was derived and shall be available for obligation until the end of the following fiscal year.
    • The Forest Highway program is repealed at the end of FY12. Forest Highways are no longer eligible for ERFO funding, unless they are Federally-owned roads that meet the requirements of 23 U.S.C. 125(e). Other State and local roads that do not meet the requirements of 23 U.S.C. 125(e) may be eligible under the Federal-aid Emergency Relief program or FEMA.
    • For eligible ERFO repairs accomplished more than 180 days after the occurrence of the natural disaster or catastrophic failure on facilities other than those meeting the definition of a Federal land transportation facility or tribal transportation facility, the Federal share payable shall be in accordance with 23 U.S.C. 120, including the sliding scale provision of 23 U.S.C. 120(b).
    • Federal land access transportation facilities are not eligible for ERFO funding under 23 U.S.C. 125.

    Repairs for Program of Projects (POPs) approved prior to and after October 1 will proceed under MAP-21 provisions. See FHWA Treatment of Carryover Highway Program Funding table. If you have any further questions, please contact Mr. Sergio Mayorga at 202-366-9491.

    Sergio Mayorga
    ERFO Program Manager
    Office of Federal Lands Highway
    Location: Washington, DC
    Phone: (202) 366-9491
    Email: sergio.mayorga@dot.gov

    J. “Eric” Wright
    ERFO Coordinator
    Eastern Federal Lands Highway Division (EFL)
    Location: Sterling, Virginia
    Phone: (571) 434-1547
    Email: john.wright@dot.gov

    Lorell Duteil
    ERFO Coordinator
    Central Federal Lands Highway Division (CFL)
    Location: Lakewood, Colorado
    Phone: (720) 963-3425
    Email: lorell.duteil@dot.gov

    David Hilgendorf
    ERFO Coordinator
    Western Federal Lands Highway Division (WFL)
    Location: Vancouver, Washington
    Phone: (360) 619-7620
    Email: david.hilgendorf@dot.gov