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  • The Elwha River Limbo Land

    The Elwha River Limbo Land

    SOME 1,100 ACRES OF LAND WITH AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE?

    ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AUGUST 10, 2012  By Lynda V. Mapes  Seattle Times staff reporter

    WHAT WILL BECOME OF “THE SO CALLED PROJECT LANDS”? THAT USED TO BE UNDER THE ELWHA DAM AND LAKE ALDWELL?

    THEY WERE TO BE SET ASIDE FOR USE, AS, BY ELIGIBLE PARTY’S?

    THAT IS THE SO-CALLED PROJECT LANDS WERE SET ASIDE, “ACCORDING” TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE ELWHA ACT, PASSED BY CONGRESS IN 1992.

    WERE THEY FACTUALLY?  SPECIFICALLY? SET ASIDE BY CONGRESS IN THE 1992 ELWHA ACT??

    WHY IS CLALLAM COUNTY WA NOT LISTED AS AN ELIGIBLE PARTY FOR A CLALLAM COUNTY RECREATIONAL AREA?

    WHEN CONGRESS AUTHORIZED REMOVAL OF THE DAM SOUTHWEST OF PORT ANGELES IN 1992, THE SO-CALLED PROJECT LANDS WERE TO BE SET ASIDE EITHER FOR USE AS

    1. A STATE PARK,
    2. A NATIONAL PARK OR
    3. A NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, OR
    4. BE TRANSFERRED TO THE LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE.

    SO FAR, THE TRIBE IS THE ONLY ELIGIBLE PARTY THAT HAS A PLAN AND A DESIRE FOR THE LAND.

    AUGUST 10, 2012 THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE INTENDS TO LAUNCH A PUBLIC PROCESS TO DECIDE THE LONG-TERM DISPOSITION OF THE LAND, BUT AT THE MOMENT HAS NO FUNDING TO PAY FOR AN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OR ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT STATEMENT, NOTED TODD SUESS, ACTING SUPERINTENDENT FOR OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK.

    THE AGENCY IS AWARE THE TRIBE WANTS THE LAND, BUT CAN’T JUST TURN IT OVER. “WE NEED TO HAVE A PUBLIC PROCESS,” SUESS SAID.

    FOR NOW, THE PARK SERVICE, WHICH ALREADY MANAGES 85 PERCENT OF THE ELWHA WATERSHED, IS MANAGING THE LANDS. PARK RANGERS ARE PROVIDING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND OFFERING INTERPRETIVE WALKS ON SOME OF THE PROJECT LANDS, EXCLUDING THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES, WHICH ARE CONFIDENTIAL AND PROTECTED.

    NO MATTER WHO ENDS UP OWNING THE LAND, MORE THAN 700 ACRES OF IT ALONG THE RIVER AND IN ITS FLOOD PLAIN WILL REMAIN IN ITS NATURAL STATE IN PERPETUITY,

    WITH PUBLIC ACCESS MAINTAINED.

    THAT IS ACCORDING TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE ELWHA ACT, PASSED BY CONGRESS IN 1992.

    ——————————————————————

    QUESTION THIS….. SOME 1,100 ACRES OF PUBLIC LAND WAITING IN OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK LIMBO LAND SINCE AUGUST 10, 2012?

    ACCORDING TO ???? 

    THAT IS “ACCORDING” TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE ELWHA ACT, PASSED BY CONGRESS IN 1992.

    READ THE ELWHA ACT, WHAT DID IT PROMISE? CLEAN WATER? HOW MUCH WATER? POWER REPLACEMENT? PUBLIC ACCESS INTO PERPETUITY? 

    WITH ALL THE FALSE NEWS NOW DAYS….

    THIS IS THE LAW, READ IT,  YOU DECIDE…

    Public Law 102-495 102d Congress An Act

    https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/STATUTE-106/pdf/STATUTE-106-Pg3173.pdf

    Oct 24, 1992 – 24, 1992. 106 STAT. 3173. Public Law 102-495. 102d Congress. An Act … SHORT TITLE. This Act may be referred to as the “Elwha River Ecosystem … of the Projects and his plans for the full restoration of the Elwha.

    ———————————————————————————-

    ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AUGUST 10, 2012 at 9:00 pm Updated February 11, 2016 at 12:49 pm

    Elwha tribe finds legendary creation site, wants uncovered land

    WHAT WILL BECOME OF THE LANDS THAT USED TO BE UNDER THE ELWHA DAM AND LAKE ALDWELL, including sacred lands of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe?

    Section Sponsor Share story

    By Lynda V. Mapes Seattle Times staff reporter

    SLOWLY EMERGING FROM WHAT USED TO BE UNDER LAKE ALDWELL AND ELWHA DAM ARE SOME 1,100 ACRES OF LAND WITH AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE.

    WHEN CONGRESS AUTHORIZED REMOVAL OF THE DAM SOUTHWEST OF PORT ANGELES IN 1992, THE SO-CALLED PROJECT LANDS WERE TO BE SET ASIDE EITHER FOR USE AS A STATE PARK, A NATIONAL PARK OR A NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, OR BE TRANSFERRED TO THE LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE. SO FAR, THE TRIBE IS THE ONLY ELIGIBLE PARTY THAT HAS A PLAN AND A DESIRE FOR THE LAND.

    That desire became even more intense last month, with the discovery of the tribe’s creation site. Long passed on in oral tradition, the sacred site is where, by tribal teaching, the Creator bathed and blessed the Klallam people, and where tribal members for generations uncounted sought to learn their future.

    But the site was covered by the waters behind Elwha Dam, and had not been seen by anyone in the tribe since construction of the dam between 1910 and 1913. Many feared it had been destroyed by blasting during dam construction — and some came to doubt if it had ever existed at all.

    Frances Charles, chairwoman of the tribe, said she and other tribal members visited the site last month after receiving a call from National Park Service cultural-resources staff, who believed they had found the site.

    “A group of us walked to the site and actually stood on the rock known to us as the creation site,” Charles said this week. “It was eerie in some ways. We were walking on the soil that had been underwater for 100 years, and witnessing the old cedars. It was emotional, with joy and happiness. We sang a prayer song and an honor song, and had the opportunity to stand there and really praise our ancestors and the elders for telling the stories.”

    To see that those stories actually were true was overwhelming, Charles said.

    “To so many out there, it was a myth,” she said. “To be able to feel the spiritual tie to the land, and know, yes, this is real, the stories that you have heard, they are true. It is very, very powerful and very humbling.”

    The park service also reported this week finding a site in another location within a former reservoir that documents human use as far back as 8,000 years ago, establishing it as one of the oldest known archaeological sites on the Olympic Peninsula. The park service collected material for analysis and reburied the site.

    For the tribe, the recovery of its cultural sites is a deeper dimension of the Elwha restoration, affirming the truth of the tribe’s presence here for so long.

    “The land continues to show us, it speaks,” Charles said. “To be able to go down there and feel the power of the water and the land, and look at a landmark that has been covered for so many years, now being able to breathe.”

    THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE INTENDS TO LAUNCH A PUBLIC PROCESS TO DECIDE THE LONG-TERM DISPOSITION OF THE LAND, BUT AT THE MOMENT HAS NO FUNDING TO PAY FOR AN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OR ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT STATEMENT, NOTED TODD SUESS, ACTING SUPERINTENDENT FOR OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK.

    THE AGENCY IS AWARE THE TRIBE WANTS THE LAND, BUT CAN’T JUST TURN IT OVER. “WE NEED TO HAVE A PUBLIC PROCESS,” SUESS SAID.

    FOR NOW, THE PARK SERVICE, WHICH ALREADY MANAGES 85 PERCENT OF THE ELWHA WATERSHED, IS MANAGING THE LANDS. PARK RANGERS ARE PROVIDING LAW ENFORCEMENT AND OFFERING INTERPRETIVE WALKS ON SOME OF THE PROJECT LANDS, EXCLUDING THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES, WHICH ARE CONFIDENTIAL AND PROTECTED.

    NO MATTER WHO ENDS UP OWNING THE LAND, MORE THAN 700 ACRES OF IT ALONG THE RIVER AND IN ITS FLOOD PLAIN WILL REMAIN IN ITS NATURAL STATE IN PERPETUITY, WITH PUBLIC ACCESS MAINTAINED. THAT IS ACCORDING TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE ELWHA ACT, PASSED BY CONGRESS IN 1992.

    But the tribe, if it comes to steward the lands, also would like to use some portions of the remaining property outside the archaeological sites and river corridor for housing or economic development, said Robert Elofson, director of river restoration for the tribe.

    In addition to protecting the tribe’s cultural resources, transfer of the property to the tribe would help the Lower Elwha Klallam realize a long unmet need for an adequate land base, Elofson said.

    When the United States purchased the core of what is now the tribe’s reservation in the late 1930s, the superintendent of the then-Office of Indian Affairs stated that six sections of land, almost 4,500 acres along the Elwha River, would be the appropriate size of the reservation for the tribe — which was far smaller then.

    But in the end, the government acquired only 300 acres for the tribe — and took another three decades to finally convey the land for the tribe’s reservation in 1968, in part because of opposition by sport fishermen.

    The tribe has continued to buy land ever since on its own, and today has about 1,000 acres along the Elwha River. But the reservation still is missing the lands that used to be under Elwha Dam and its reservoir.

    “We lost a lot of land,” said Adeline Smith, one of the oldest living members of the tribe. “There were campsites along the river, and at least two big settlements. The medicinal plants, the berries, the wildlife, they were all part of our life by the river.

    “It was ours and our way of life. I hope someday it will be again.”

    Lynda V. Mapes: 206-464-2736 or lmapes@seattletimes.com. On Twitter @lyndavmapes.

    Lynda V. Mapes: 206-464-2736 or lmapes@seattletimes.com; on Twitter: @LyndaVMapes. Lynda specializes in coverage of the environment, natural history, and Native American tribes.

    —————————————————————

    WHAT WILL BECOME OF “THE SO CALLED PROJECT LANDS”? THAT USED TO BE UNDER THE ELWHA DAM AND LAKE ALDWELL?

    A CLALLAM COUNTY CONCERNED CITIZEN EXPRESSED INTEREST ON MARCH 9, 2017

    THE ELWHA RIVER PROJECT LANDS THAT WERE A PUBLIC TOURIST RECREATIONAL DESTINATION?

    WHAT HAS BECOME OF THE ELWHA RIVER CAMP GROUNDS, FOR PUBLIC CAMPING, PICNICS, FISHING, ALLOWING A PRIVATE WALKS ON PUBLIC TRAILS,  UN-ESCORTED BY ONP PARK RANGERS, PEACEFUL HIKING TRAILS,  SOLITUDE WITHOUT ONP RANGERS INTERPRETATIONS ,  A BOAT LAUNCH, RESTROOMS, A STORE, AND OUR CITIZENS WAY OF LIFE. I HOPE SOMEDAY IT WILL BE AGAIN.”

    THIS IS A  CLALLAM COUNTY CONCERNED CITIZEN EXPRESSING  INTEREST

    Behind My Back | The New Elwha Bridge and Rest Stop?

    www.behindmyback.org/2017/03/09/the-new-elwha-bridge-and-rest-stop/

    Mar 9, 2017 – With the replacement of the Elwha River bridge by WSDOT at an … Why stop with just a Clallam County rest stop on the Norm’s Resort Property …

    THESE ARE CONCERNED CITIZEN’S OF CLALLAM COUNTY EXPRESSING  INTEREST

    Clallam County WA | Citizen Review Online

    citizenreviewonline.org/category/clallam-county-wa/

    Posted on March 9, 2017 by Pearl Rains Hewett, www.behindmyback.org. The New Elwha Bridge and Rest Stop? Who knew? What Rest Stop?


  • China Dam Smart? U.S.A. Dam Stupid?

    China Dam Smart?  U.S.A. Dam Stupid?

    CHINA WAS SO DAM SMART THAT THEY BUILT THE BIGGEST DAM IN THE WORLD

    The Chinese dam policy was to build and keep dams to provide clean renewable electric power, control the dam water and prevent the dam flooding and release the dam water to prevent drought

    HE WHO CONTROLS THE WATER CONTROLS THE WORLD?

    WHAT PART OF THIS DAM CHINESE POLICY DID THE DAM US GOVERNMENT NOT UNDERSTAND?

    IT WAS NOT HE WHO “OWNS THE WATER”, WOTUS….

    IT IS”HE WHO CONTROLS THE WATER”

    Behind My Back | WOTUS “Water Runs Down Hill”

    www.behindmyback.org/2015/09/04/wotus-water-runs-down-hill/

    Sep 4, 2015 – “WATERS OF UNITED STATES” POWER GRAB. WOTUS RULE – Pacific Legal Foundation https://www.pacificlegal.org/wotus. Pacific Legal Foundation

    DAMS CONTROL WATER. period

    THE STUPID US GOVERNMENT WAS SO “DAM DUMB” THEY WORK FOR THE DAM LOBBYIST AND THE DAM SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS. SAVE THE DAM SALMON AT WHAT COST?

    Behind My Back | How Dam Dumb is the US Government?

    www.behindmyback.org/2016/04/17/how-dam-dumb-is-the-us-government/

    Apr 17, 2016CHINA WAS SO DAM SMART THAT THEY BUILT THE BIGGEST DAM IN THE WORLD. … www.behindmyback.org/2015/09/04/WOTUS-WATER-RUNS-DOWN-HILL/ … Jun 12, 2013 – ACCORDING TO AMERICAN RIVERS, 65 US dams were …

    THE SAGA OF THE STUPID U.S.A. DAM DESTRUCTION

    Map of U.S. Dams Removed Since 1916 | American Rivers

    https://www.americanrivers.org/threats-solutions/restoring…rivers/dam-removal-map/

    Today, many dams that were once at the epicenter of a community’s livelihood are now old, unsafe or no longer serving their intended purposes. Learn how …

    THE ELWHA RIVER DAMS THAT WERE ONCE THE EPICENTER OF OUR COMMUNITY’S LIVELIHOOD, ARE NO LONGER SERVING THEIR INTENDED PURPOSES. period

    THEIR INTENDED DAM PURPOSES?  Protecting and Providing Clallam County’s infrastructure, (the fundamental facilities and systems serving a country, city, or area, as transportation and communication systems, power plants)

    Indeed, THE INTENDED ELWHA DAM PURPOSES, Dam cheap, dam clean hydroelectric power, dam renewable energy that kept the dam economy strong, providing a clean water supply, insuring flooding and drought protection, preventing millions of dam dollars of destruction in and on public and private land, property, protecting public access roads, and A COUPLE OF the really big epicenter of our communities livelihood,  THE OLYMPIC HOT SPRINGS ROAD? THE TOURISM, THE ACCESS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES IN THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK THAT KEPT OUR ECONOMY STRONG, INCLUDED TWO BEAUTIFUL LAKES.

    IT’S A DAM SHAME THAT 300,000 TOURISTS  CAN’T GET THERE FROM PORT ANGELES WA.

    LEARN HOW DAM STUPID…….THE REMOVAL OF THE BIGGEST DAM REMOVAL EVER, WORKED OUT FOR PORT ANGELES, CLALLAM COUNTY ETAL., WASHINGTON STATE U.S.A.

    AS PRESIDENT TRUMP ASKED “HOW’S THE U.S.A DAM

    SYSTEM WORKING OUT FOR YOU?

    SEABURY BLAIR JR. | Elwha too clogged for fish to live

    Seabury Blair Jr.
    Columnist

    Posted: April 15, 2013

     

    Two days after I hiked the sandy, rocky desolation that used to be Lake Mills, as many as 200,000 chinook salmon were killed in what has to be one of the biggest blunders in the history of the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife.

    The year-old salmon were released from the new $16 million Elwha Hatchery run by the state and Lower Elwha Klallam tribe on April 5. Most — if not all — were killed when they tried to swim downstream through the thick gray goop that is the lower Elwha River, created by the removal of two dams built illegally in 1910.

    Though they only had to negotiate 3.5 miles of the river before reaching clearer waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the silt in the river began choking them almost the minute they swam from the crystalline hatchery water into the moving mire that is the Elwha. Hatchery officials reported seeing hundreds of dead smolts lining the riverbank, their gills clogged by the same silt that forced “temporary closure” of a $70 million Elwha River water treatment plant.

    In the Port Angeles Daily News, Mike Gross, Fish and Wildlife biologist, called the release of the salmon “a mistake.” Gross said he suspected the fish suffocated when silt prevented their gills from providing oxygen.

    I imagine it would be akin to trying to breathe volcanic ash for days without a mask, or running a marathon in a massive dust storm.

    Hatchery officials said they checked on the amount of silt in the Elwha on April 4, and determined it was acceptable to release the fish. They said the silt in the river increased overnight.

    I hiked about 3 miles downstream in the desolate bed of the former Lake Mills on April 3, and I don’t need a degree in biology to tell you that no fish could live in that water. The river looked no different when I left the Elwha Campground on April 4.

    For almost 15 miles, the Elwha River carves through a century’s worth of mud, sand and river cobble deposited behind the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. Above Rica Canyon, at the entrance to the former Lake Mills, the river is the same old blue friend I’ve known for more than 50 years.

    But beginning at the old Lake Mills inlet, the river turns into gray slurry that is poison to any fish. I don’t imagine many wild animals drink from that deadly potion and live, either.

    Fisheries biologists have been releasing coho salmon into Indian Creek, which flows from the west into the Elwha; and Little River, which flows from the east. Both tributaries are about 7 miles upstream from the mouth of the river.

    They’ve reported some of the fish, along with a few chinook they released into Lake Mills before it became the desolation it is today, have survived the gantlet of poison. Now the state is planning to release nearly a million salmon from the hatchery in June.

    About the same time, work on removing the remainder of the Glines Canyon dam is expected to resume, which will surely cause more sediment to be swept downstream. Worse, concrete dust from the dam will be stirred into the mix, making it even more deadly.

    Let us hope the state and tribe can think of a way to get healthy salmon from the hatchery to the Strait before they kill a million more fish.

    Seabury Blair Jr. is the author of Backcountry Ski! Washington; Day Hike! Olympic Peninsula; Day Hike! Columbia Gorge; The Creaky Knees Guide to Washington; the Creaky Knees Guide to Oregon; and Washington Wild Roads. Email Seabury at skiberry@hughes.net.

    ————————————————————————-

    HOW’S THE SYSTEM WORKING OUT FOR PORT ANGELES WA?

    Port Angeles to sue Park Service in dispute over Elwha River water …

    www.peninsuladailynews.com/…/port-angeles-to-sue-park-service-in-dispute-over-el

    6 days ago – PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles City Council has set the stage for … impasse related to the historic removal of the Elwha River dams.

    snippet….City Attorney Bill Bloor said at the council meeting Tuesday that the Park Service has not provided contract information being sought by the city on the $25 million Elwha River surface water intake and treatment facilities.

    ————————————————————-

    Word gets around in cyberspace

    New post on Pie N Politics Siskiyou County CA

    Port Angeles to sue Park Service in dispute over Elwha River water facilities

    by Liz Bowen

    PNP comment:  Port Angeles is a city in and the county seat of Clallam County,

    Washington, United States. With a population of 19,038 as of the 2010 census,[7]

    it is the largest city in the county, according to Wikipedia. It is worth checking out the entire article at the link below.

    It looks like the fed gov. is not fulfilling its obligations. Shock !!! — Editor Liz Bowen

    —————————————————-

    Behind My Back | Pie N Politics page (1)

    www.behindmyback.org/2015/07/27/pie-n-politics-page-1/

    Jul 27, 2015 – Pie N Politics page (1) Pie N Politics. Like many areas of the United States, citizens in Siskiyou County are finding government regulations are …

    Aug 19, 2016 – A PLAN TO REMOVE FOUR KLAMATH RIVER DAMS

    TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY AND HABITAT FOR FISH AND RIVER COMMUNITIES

    ———————————————————————————

    The removal of  two dams on the Elwha River in WA State  2011-2014 “WAS”  previously the biggest dam removal DISASTER in U.S. History.

    After the removal of the Elwha River Dams.

    Apr 15, 2013 ELWHA RIVER WATER QUALITY?

    THE QUALITY OF MY PORT ANGELES DRINKING WATER….

    SEABURY BLAIR JR. | Elwha too clogged for fish to live – Kitsap Sun

    http://www.kitsapsun.com/sports/columnists/seabury-blair/356167261.html

    ————————————————————

    YEP, THE ELWHA DAM PROTECTED THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA’S ACCESS INFRASTRUCTURE, THE ELWHA RIVER BRIDGE.

    Battered by Dam Removal – Elwha Bridge

    Posted on January 11, 2017 4:26 pm by Pearl Rains Hewett Comment

    Battered by Dam Removal Elwha Bridge Destroyed

    A DAM TRAGEDY THE ELWHA RIVER BRIDGE

    ———————————————————————

    Flooding is a Dam Shame

    Posted on June 28, 2013 7:31 am by Pearl Rains Hewett

    Drought is a dam shame

    China was so dam smart that they built the biggest dam in the world.

    He who controls the water controls the world?

    In the USA the government was and is so dam stupid they decided that hydro electric power was not dam clean, dam cheap, dam renewable dam energy, not dam flood control and not dam drought and dam property loss prevention.

    The dam Chinese government is so dam smart they work in the best interest of the dam people.

    The Chinese dam prevents the dam loss of life, billions of dam dollars in property damage, provides dam cheap, dam clean, dam renewable, dam energy and helps keep their dam economy strong.

    The Chinese dam controls the dam water releases the dam water to eliminate the dam droughts

    What part of this dam Chinese policy does the dam US government not understand?

    THE US GOVERNMENT IS SO DAM DUMB THEY WORK FOR THE DAM LOBBYIST AND THE DAM SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS. SAVE THE DAM ENDANGERED etal., ad nausaum, SALMON AT WHAT COST?

    The best dam interest of the dam people in the USA be dammed

    As dictated by the dam US government

    The dam people in the dam USA are flooded and cleaning up the dam water damage for six dam months of the year.

    The dam people in the USA suffer the dam drought for the other six dam months of the year

    The Chinese dam policy was to build and keep dams to provide clean renewable electric power, control the dam water and prevent the dam flooding and release the dam water to prevent drought

    THE DAM USA POLICY CREATES LOSS OF DAM LIFE, DAM MISERY AND DAM SUFFERING FOR MILLIONS OF DAM AMERICANS EVERY DAM YEAR.

    AS PRESIDENT TRUMP WOULD ASK

    “HOW’S THE DAM U.S.A. SYSTEM WORKING OUT FOR YOU?


  • About Pat | Pat Neal Wildlife

    About Pat | Pat Neal Wildlife

    patnealwildlife.net/about-pat/
    —————————

    I read all “About Pat” about 8000 words.

    Pat Neal is a fishing guide on the Hoh River in Washington State. He writes a weekly (humorous) Wilderness Gossip Column on the commentary page of the Peninsula Daily News.

    ——————————————

    March 30, 2017, I sent Pat an email

    You provide a wealth of excellent unknown history.

    I have a history. When I see something, I like to say something.

    Dad fished, gaffed salmon, in Morse Creek during the depression, circa 1933,
    hundreds of salmon, that were not Dungeness Fish Hatchery?

    My Dad, George C. Rains Sr. owned the Morse Creek Valley prior to 1944, He
    sold it to Dr. Hay, (Dr Hay delivered me on Aug 30, 1941) It became the 4
    Seasons.

    Your statement, “All my friends were dying of old age”, really hit home
    It became a real problem for my research……

    I’d like to post it on my website? With your permission?

    ————————————————————————-

    —– Original Message —–

    From: “Pat Neal” <patnealwildlife@gmail.com>

    To: “pearl hewett” <phew@wavecable.com>

    Sent: Thursday, March 30, 2017 5:51 PM

    Subject: Re: When did you write this Morse Creek ?

    Pearl,

    Post away! Please provide a link and I am on facebook to with my
    latest columns. Glad you like my writing and thank you for reading.
    Pat

    ————————————————————————–

    Snippets from  “About Pat Neal”

    “I graduated from college with a degree in history. I got a
    job with the government identifying and locating historic sites,
    artifacts and objects on the Olympic Peninsula. It began a life-long
    study that continued after the job ran out, to the present day. It was
    the late ‘70s. The sons and daughters of the original pioneers of the
    Olympic Peninsula were still alive. I interviewed these people, and we
    became fast friends.”

    “The Olympic Peninsula was a paradise of big trees, elk and salmon. We
    moved to a home along the Sol Duc River.”

    “The good old days were too good to last.”

    Pat’s bottom line….

    Fishing may be bad and getting
    worse, but you can still have an awesome day on the river. Which may
    prove the old theory: The worse fishing gets, the more you need a
    guide.

    Pat Neal is a fishing guide

    He can be reached at 360-683-9867 or by email via patnealwild life@gmail.com.

    ——————————————————————

    Pat and I have a shared history of the Olympic Peninsula.

    Full unedited text

    ABOUT PAT

    I always wanted to be a fishing guide. Maybe I always was when you consider the luckless cohorts, cousins and relations who I suckered into crawling along a hornet infested, brush-choked creek in search of a six-inch cutthroat when I was a kid. Once we fished the creek out, we fished a bigger creek.

    It is difficult to drive over the treacherous Morse Creek bridge and the devil’s racetrack on either side of it these days without remembering how things used to look in the old days.

    Like every other stream entering the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Morse
    Creek had a Klallam village down at the mouth. Traces of this village
    have been hidden or obliterated like the first American homestead
    claim filed in 1863. Eban Gay Morse and his brother Davis W. Morse
    came from Nova Scotia and settled at the mouth of Morse Creek. By the
    1890s, homesteaders had worked their way clear up to the divide with
    the Lillian River.

    A.E. Cox built a cabin at the head of Morse Creek in a godforsaken
    canyon just below Hurricane Ridge. Legend has it that Cox, sitting on
    a frying pan, slid down a snow bank into what became known as Cox
    Valley in a feat that has yet to be duplicated.

    Between the mouth and the mountains, Morse Creek had some of the best
    fishing on the Peninsula, despite a waterfall that made it impassable
    to salmon for most of its length. It was left by the Pleistocene ice
    sheet long before fish passage laws were as stringent as they are
    today.

    No matter, Morse Creek used to be so full of spring chinook you could
    spear them with a pitchfork. There was a massive run of pink salmon
    that used to clog up the creek. People used to camp along the creek
    and harvest, can and smoke enough salmon to last the winter.

    One day we saw an old Indian spearing salmon in the creek. He threaded
    a dozen or so on a rope and walked them down the creek with the
    biggest stringer of fish I ever saw. We thought spearing the salmon
    was unsporting, so we shot them with bows and arrows.

    I got two one day. I packed them home. Dad said we could smoke the
    salmon or compost them. He was trying to be diplomatic about it, but
    the fish were spawn-outs and inedible. Their meat was white instead of
    the red flesh of an ocean fish, but chances are that if they were not
    spawned out, I would not have got them on the beach. We started
    fishing with poles after that.

    Morse Creek was a sportsman’s paradise. There were so many bears
    fishing for salmon you could walk down to the creek and see their
    tracks on top of your own when you walked home. There were orchards
    with apples free for the picking. We would build a fire and bake them
    in the coals with a little brown sugar along with trout wrapped in tin
    foil.

    There were abandoned homesteads, old logging equipment and a meadow
    with a big warning sign that said, “Danger: Unexploded artillery
    shells. Do not enter, no trespassing,” blah, blah, blah. It was like a
    magnet for half-wit juvenile delinquents looking to find a souvenir
    from the war. We spent a lot of time looking for those shells, not
    really knowing what we would do if we found one. Make our own
    fireworks I suppose.

    Then one day Morse Creek turned brown right in the middle of summer.
    This was strange since the creek was still low and we had no rain.
    Sure enough, there was a big old bulldozer running down the middle of
    the creek.

    That was bad, but salmon are tough. Naturally occurring floods in
    salmon streams can do more damage than an army of bulldozers. Salmon
    can survive a flood. The volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens turned
    the Toutle River into slurry of toxic ash. Salmon can survive a
    volcano. Why can’t salmon survive in Morse Creek?

    They spent millions of dollars buying property from willing sellers,
    planting native vegetation and building log jams to bring the fish
    back, but that has never worked anywhere.

    As it turned out, the once plentiful salmon in Morse Creek were
    planted by the Dungeness Fish Hatchery. It was there I learned some
    important lessons about fisheries management. Runs of hatchery fish
    always fail once you stop planting them. A river is worth more dead
    than alive. Fish are worth more to the state as endangered species
    than as food for people.

    Once Morse Creek was fished out, it was time to move on to the rivers
    we followed to lakes high in the Olympic Mountains. I wanted to catch
    every fish in those mountains. The truth is you could fish the
    Olympics your whole life and not cover all of the water any more than
    you could learn all of its history, but I tried. I have been exploring
    the Olympic Peninsula my whole life and have not seen parts of it yet.
    Looking for new country just comes natural. I did not get this way by
    myself.

    The Neal family came from Ireland, a land known for its salmon, elk
    and timber since it was first populated about 8,000 years ago. The
    Irish elk was a giant of the deer family with antlers eight feet wide.
    By the middle Stone Age, farmers had cut down the trees and overgrazed
    the land until parts of Ireland were eroded down to bare limestone.

    With the British invasion in the 16th century, the Irish elk was
    extinct and salmon were no longer a food source for the common people.
    The fish and whatever game that was left was owned by feudal lords.
    The natives were pushed off their lands. The survivors were shipped
    overseas to the New World as slave labor on plantations and penal
    colonies or herded into sharecropper plots to grow potatoes.

    The introduction of the potato to Ireland set off a population boom
    and bust cycle of famine and disease described by the British
    economist Thomas Malthus, who observed the Irish population increased
    geometrically while their subsistence increased arithmetically.
    Jonathan Swift presented a solution to the Malthus Theory with a
    “Modest Proposal” that advised Irish parents to sell their children as
    food for the rich. Swift thought it only made sense since the rich had
    already consumed most of the rest of Ireland.

    At the time we were named O’Neal. It was most likely a British name.
    Conquerors have invariably renamed their subjects with something they
    could pronounce. The first written reference to a Neal was a Daniel
    Neal who wrote “The History of New England” in 1720. That does not
    mean he went there. Then, as now, it was common for writers to crank
    out promotional copy in hopes of luring people into buying exotic real
    estate.

    At the time you could get passage across the Atlantic Ocean by working
    6 years as an indentured servant, which is how Robert O’Neal, my
    earliest documented relation, and an estimated 80 percent of the
    population of the American Colonies got here.

    Robert dropped the “O” in Neal and settled in Virginia in the
    mid-1700s. One of Robert’s sons, Cornelius, served under Francis
    Marion, also known as The Swamp Fox. Marion’s guerilla force of black
    and white volunteers sometimes dwindled to 20 men. There were times
    during the Revolutionary War that this tiny force was the only
    resistance to the British Army in the state of South Carolina.

    After the war, Cornelius Neal bought a large tract of land in
    Tennessee with a warrant he was issued for his service. Tennessee was
    known for its big timber and good hunting. One sycamore measured nine
    feet in diameter. The herds of buffalo were so large they were known
    to destroy the settlers’ cabins. Massive herds of buffalo, elk and
    deer were slaughtered over the mineral licks.

    The passage of the Indian Removal Act in June, 1830 declared that the
    Indians would “exchange” their lands — including what is today
    Kentucky, Tennessee, North and South Carolina, southwestern Virginia,
    Alabama and Georgia — for lands west of the Mississippi River.

    In 1838, General Winfield Scott lead 7,000 troops to round up an
    estimated 18,000 Cherokees and other members of the “Five Civilized
    Tribes,” who began their “Trail of Tears” from Tennessee to Indian
    Territory, or what is known as Oklahoma today. An estimated 4,000
    people died on the journey.

    The Neals moved west to Missouri. Before long it was time to go west
    again. In 1843, Congress tried to pass a bill that promised every male
    settler in Oregon Territory, which included what is now Washington and
    Idaho, 640 acres, 160 acres to his wife and another 160 to each child.
    This was a political move to bluff the British out of the Joint
    Occupation Treaty where both countries were sharing Oregon while
    American settlers were invading it. The bill did not pass, but the
    Neals headed west sure that it would.

    On April 15, 1844, the Neals set out from Independence, Missouri
    during the worst flood in recorded history. The Neal wagon train was
    one of five trains with about 1,000 souls and oxen, milk cows, horses,
    mules and dogs, including two Newfoundlands. It rained up to 80 hours
    at a time. It took two days to cross the Missouri River. Most of the
    rest of this journey has been described in excruciating detail by a
    number of sources.

    Literacy was rare on the frontier. Family legend has it that one of
    the Neals learned to read by tracing his fingers along the label of a
    whiskey bottle. Some of the Neal women could read and write. They kept
    a journal that has survived to the present.

    The Neals hired James Clyman as a guide. He was one of the greatest
    characters in the history of the American West. Clyman and Jedediah
    Smith crossed South Pass in 1824, which gave Americans control of the
    fur trade between the Rockies and the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    In 1827, William Sublette took the first wagons over South Pass, part
    of a route that would become the Oregon Trail. After years as a
    trapper, Clyman hired on as a guide for the Neal wagons. When Clyman
    returned from Oregon on his way back to Missouri, he rode with
    Lansford Hastings over a route that Hastings was promoting as the
    fastest road to California. The route had been described in “The
    Emigrants’ Guide to Oregon and California,” a book Hastings published
    before he had actually seen the pass and the impassable canyons that
    lead to it. Clyman, who had a better idea of the country and where
    wagons could and could not travel, warned against what was called “The
    Hastings Cuttoff.”

    Upon his return to Fort Laramie, Clyman met many California emigrants.
    Some listened to Clyman and chose to go to Oregon. The infamous Donner
    Party did not listen. The Neals did not listen much better.

    Clyman was a literate mountain man who kept a journal. He mentioned
    how the Neal Party covered about 30 miles the first week, some of it
    through knee-deep mud. The train split up as the wagons travelled at
    different speeds. Clyman told us to stick together as a defense
    against attacks by Indians. We ran into some Shawnee in Kansas that we
    had chased out of Tennessee. Clyman describes them raising corn, beans
    and potatoes in a land stripped of game.

    Clyman described how our train was full of “discontent and grumbling”
    about serving night guard duty. After a night of the horses and mules
    running loose to graze, 15 or 20 could be missing in the morning.

    As the journey progressed, discipline became strict. As punishment for
    falling asleep on guard duty, the offender was dismounted and forced
    to walk on the day’s march. One man was left staked out on the prairie
    in the rain for a day.

    Moving out onto the Great Plains, we ran into vast herds of buffalo.
    Clyman described how some men in the train abandoned guard duty,
    leaving no defense for the wagons, to go buffalo hunting. Hunting was
    good. We left 40,000 pounds of meat to rot on the prairie. There were
    so many buffalo they ate all the grass. There was nothing left for our
    stock to graze. Clyman noted herds of bighorn sheep, elk and deer. He
    guarded the women on expeditions picking berries, plums and cherries.
    The women described this stretch of the trail in their own journals as
    “The sweetest living we have ever known.”

    It took 78 days for us to reach Fort Laramie, a journey that normally
    took 40. In in his classic book “The Oregon Trail,” the historian
    Francis Parkman describes the Missourians as, “tall awkward men, in
    brown homespun, women with cadaverous faces … being devoid of delicacy
    or propriety … They seemed like men totally out of their element;
    bewildered and amazed like a troop of schoolboys in the woods. I was
    at a loss to account for this perturbed state of mind. It was not
    cowardice. Yet for the most part they are the rudest and most ignorant
    of the frontier population; they know nothing of the country and its
    inhabitants; they had already experienced much misfortune, and
    apprehended more; being strangers, we were looked upon as enemies.”

    The Neals tried to buy supplies with our scarce money or trade with
    our extra possessions, but the prices at Fort Laramie were
    outrageously inflated. Clyman’s shopping list reveals flour was $40.00
    a barrel and sugar was $1.50 a pint. A tanned deerskin was $2.50, and
    they were all out of dried buffalo meat. This was at a time when wages
    were $1.50 a day and land went for $5 an acre.

    Parkman was visiting Fort Laramie on the chance he could observe a
    real Indian war. He followed the Sioux around for weeks and all they
    did was hunt buffalo and cut teepee poles. Disappointed, bored and
    suffering from the symptoms of dysentery, Parkman went back east and
    stayed there.

    The Neals continued west. We shot out the game, polluted the water
    holes and outraged the Indians. We made it to Oregon on Christmas Eve
    and settled along the Santiam River at a place we named Ale, a name
    that was later changed to Stayton. There we waited for the railroad to
    catch up.

    With the invention of the chainsaw, we followed the railroads north
    and west to the Olympic Peninsula where I live today.
    The Olympic Peninsula was a paradise of big trees, elk and salmon. We
    moved to a home along the Sol Duc River.

    By chance, the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas
    moved next door. While there is a disturbing trend among some writers
    to pander fleeting celebrity references as an excuse for responsible
    journalism, it was never that way with the late U.S. Supreme Court
    Justice William O. Douglas and me. From the day we met until he
    recessed to that big Appeals Court in the sky, U.S. Supreme Court
    Justice William O. Douglas and I shared a relationship that was beyond
    words.

    Appointed to the Supreme Court by President Roosevelt, U.S. Supreme
    Court Justice William O. Douglas served our nation’s highest court
    through one of the most tumultuous periods of American history.

    As a conservationist, U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas
    had a burning passion to preserve and protect the wilderness. I think
    he came to the Olympic Peninsula to get away from it all. Instead, he
    moved next door to the Neal Family. We were loggers. U.S. Supreme
    Court Justice William O. Douglas was a tree hugger with a reputation
    for being soft on the commies and fast with the women. Conflicts were
    inevitable.

    Things came to a head along about the summer of 1958. U.S. Supreme
    Court Justice William O. Douglas dropped by the house and mentioned he
    was going on a hike to protest a new road the Park Service wanted to
    build out on the Pacific Coast.

    At the time, I was a road builder. I had a dump truck, a road grader
    and an Army tank. Heck, I had my own army with flamethrowers, mortars
    and machine guns all on a dirt pile in the driveway. Every once in a
    while I would bomb my own fort with dirt clods just for fun.

    I had big dreams for a four-year-old: a dump truck army building roads
    across my dirt pile and beyond. And here this big shot, city slicker
    U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas was trying to shut down
    my job before I even got one. I may have said some things he
    regretted.

    I wanted to go on that beach hike to protest the protest. I had my
    blanket and my pet stuffed monkey all ready. All I needed was a sack
    of jam sandwiches and I could have hit the trail. Instead I got some
    static from the war department. Mom said I could not go off on a beach
    hike with that “pinko judge and his floozies.”

    Looking back with the hindsight of history, U.S. Supreme Court Justice
    William O. Douglas might have been right all along. The deterioration
    of our National Parks infrastructure is a national disgrace. The
    National Park Service can’t maintain the roads they have. They have no
    business building anymore. Later we moved to Sappho, and that is the
    last we ever saw of U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas.

    Sappho was once the largest and most modern logging camp on the
    Olympic Peninsula. It is now nothing more than a wide spot along
    Highway 101. Logging camps had long been considered to be like
    an American gulag with cork boots. Conditions were rough, working six
    11-hour days in a row with Sundays off to boil the lice out of your
    woolies and change the straw in your bed.

    During World War I, Colonel Disque of the Spruce Division built a
    railroad to haul spruce from Lake Pleasant through Sappho into Port
    Angeles. The colonel insisted on humane living conditions for his
    soldier-loggers, so even though not one stick of spruce came over the
    railroad before the war ended, conditions in the logging camps
    improved. Not that the loggers would admit it. Each logging camp was
    said to have three crews: one quitting, one working and one getting
    hired.

    The railroad was very important to the history of Sappho. It was
    blamed for starting a fire just west of Lake Crescent in the summer of
    1951. Rangers put the fire out but they can burn underground in tree
    roots for weeks undetected. On Sept. 18, a 50-mile an hour east wind
    kicked up and pushed the fire all the way to Forks, almost burning the
    town before the wind shifted and the fire stopped at the Calawah
    River.

    Suddenly Sappho was all set to salvage 35,000 acres of prime timber
    from what has been known ever since as The Forks Fire.  My old man was
    a timber cruiser; he determined the number of board feet in a forest
    before it was cut.

    Loggers were using diesel-powered high lead towers and
    gasoline-powered chain saws. The Spruce Railroad was replaced by log
    trucks that delivered 200 loads of logs into Port Angeles every day.
    We lived in the upscale section of Sappho, kitty corner from the
    cookhouse where fine dining was to be had with three heart-stopping
    meals a day. I still remember my first peanut butter sandwich. It was
    the best.

    My neighbor Larry had a pool. I had a swimsuit. Larry’s dad was a log
    truck driver. My dad said they would drive for free if you would just
    paint their names on the door of the truck. I wondered how they could
    afford such a big pool. It must have been six feet across and a foot
    and a half deep when it was blown up.

    Larry was a real card. I remember when all us kids were herded over to
    watch them hoist an elk out of a crummy, (a truck used to transport
    loggers to the job). Larry said, “That thing is as big as a buffalo.”
    I thought that was the funniest thing I ever heard.

    At some point tragedy struck. We moved to town. As September
    approached, each day was like another day closer to the end of life as
    I knew it: the first day of school.

    I am not blaming anyone for my fear of school, but it is probably my
    big sister’s fault. She said I was adopted from an orphanage for the
    criminally insane so I had better watch my step. My big sister was two
    years older than me and more than happy to tell me anything she wanted
    me to know about school.

    “They put you in a big dark room with no windows. They have a big
    spotlight,” she said. “They shine the light on the teacher who stands
    up in front of the class talking all day long.”

    “What if you have to go to the bathroom?” I asked.

    “You’d better not. They’ll shine the spotlight on you and everyone
    will know,” she said.

    Try as she might to look on the bright side, my big sister could not
    shield me forever from the harsh realities of that first day of
    school. There were the fellow students, a half-wit gang of
    sucker-punchers who remain my friends to this day. There were the
    teachers who I try to avoid to this day.

    There were student activities like lunchtime. That was an opportunity
    to share whatever special treats mom packed in the old lunch box with
    your new friends … if you knew what was good for you. Some of the
    big kids had been stuck in grade school for so long they had started
    shaving. So if you had a problem sharing your blackberry pie for a
    rotten banana, you would better wolf it down first thing in the
    morning before you got on the bus.

    There was recess, with games like Crack the Whip, Dutch Knuckles and
    Indian Rope Burn. The teachers didn’t seem to care what we did. We
    thought they were in the basement smoking or something. No one wanted
    to bother the teachers unless we couldn’t get the bleeding stopped on
    our own.

    On a good day, we’d head out across a gravel pit, through a brush pile
    and into a real live haunted house with a hidden treasure: a stack of
    old National Geographics that would have made Caligula blush.

    Before you knew it a teacher fired a signal shot out of an old Luger
    she brought back from the war and recess was over. We’d line up for a
    drink at the water fountain. Just when you were ready to gulp down a
    drink, some joker would plow into the back of the line crushing the
    unfortunate drinker face first into the fountain. Sometimes the
    fountain was plugged up with blood and teeth so you almost didn’t want
    a drink but that’s all there was.

    That was the old days, the late Pleistocene I think. We used fountain
    pens, which could shoot ink quite a way when you got them sighted in.
    Once you got inked, you were bound to get pasted, with the white gooey
    stuff you could never wipe off. Mix in the rotten fruit and dirt bags
    you were constantly getting pelted with and you could come home from
    school looking like a modern art painting.

    Then there were classes like math where they tried to teach us to
    count without taking off our shoes. At some point, they hit us with
    the new math, which I didn’t get either. The math teacher said, “pie
    are square,” when anyone knows pies are round. Blackberry cobblers and
    apple crisps are square. I must have been a child genius to figure
    that out, but the know-it-all teachers just laughed.

    Discipline was strict. They impacted my self-esteem, sometimes with
    large pieces of wood. Like many Catholic schoolchildren in the ’60s, I
    was convinced I was going to hell. That was the bad news. The good
    news was that all my friends would be there.

    A  lot of my friends were altar boys and I was too. These days it is
    very popular to make fun of altar boys with jokes like “Why doesn’t
    the Catholic Church allow birth control? Because altar boys don’t get
    pregnant.” But in the old days of the Latin Mass, you had to have your
    act together to be an altar boy. Those unfamiliar with the Catholic
    faith probably don’t know what a big job that was. After you learned
    Latin, you were in charge of the water, wine, bread, candles, incense,
    bells, a medieval wardrobe and in some cases crowd control in
    everything from baptisms to funerals.

    Meanwhile there was no slouching, fidgeting, or worse, sleeping
    allowed. Well maybe that wasn’t the worst thing you could do as an
    altar boy. The worst thing would be dropping the bread, which
    represents the body of Christ. Go dropping Jesus during Communion and
    you’d find yourself serving 6 a.m. Mass with the new guys for the rest
    of your altar-boy career.

    Screw-ups who couldn’t light the candles, fire up the incense or pour
    water were never going to fast track their way up to the big time, the
    Holiday High Masses. That’s where you made the big bucks, up to $5 for
    a midnight Mass.

    Then there was that other special perk that few realized. Being an
    altar boy meant you could skip a lot of school on religious grounds.
    People died all the time so there were funerals during the week. We
    called it “the graveyard shift.”  At the time I would have skipped
    school to go frog hunting if I could get away with it, but serving
    Mass at funerals was the only alibi that would pass the parental
    guidance committee.

    It didn’t take long for the money and the free pass out of class to go
    right to our heads. We thought we were better than everyone. We could
    look down our nose at the drunks who only came to church once a year
    at midnight on Christmas Eve or Easter while we went almost every day.
    Never mind that we were sneaking the sacramental wine, what the heck.
    We smoked and chewed, so pounding a little vino first thing in the
    morning was no big deal.

    Still, being an altar boy was not without its special challenges and
    humbling episodes that confirmed our worst suspicions, that we were as
    rotten as anyone.

    People talk about seven deadly sins, but they never mention the one
    that might have been worse than all the others put together to an
    altar boy: flatulence. You had only one chance to get away with it.
    You wanted to be ringing the bells during the attack and maybe move
    along and light off a big lump of incense really quick before the
    guilty party could be identified. I often think of this when people
    refer to Catholic Mass as “bells and smells.”

    Eventually I started going to a bigger church. It contained one of the
    Earth’s greatest treasures: silence. This church was so big it had
    mountains, giant trees and a river running through it. I took my
    priest friend out to my church on the Queets River and confessed I was
    a poor excuse for an altar boy. He caught a nice silver and all my
    sins were forgiven.

    After what seemed like a year of school and church and church and
    school, we made it to the best day of the year: the last day of
    school.

    I wonder if any words in the English language filled me with such a
    sense of wonder as a child. I wondered if I would ever get to the next
    grade. By the last day of school, the dread of getting that final
    report card hung in my gut like a chunk of lead.

    The teachers liked to make a big deal about how much they would miss
    us when school was out. I thought of how much I’d miss my fellow
    classmates, if I was lucky. Some of them had BB guns and weren’t
    afraid to use them. Others had gangs or fighting dogs so you wanted to
    plan on missing your classmates all summer long if at all possible.

    The best way to avoid your classmates was to go camping in the Olympic
    Mountains.

    You hear a lot these days about getting close to nature and camping
    without leaving a trace. We did that. If our camps had been any closer
    to nature, they would have been underground. Since then all our old
    camping places have been bulldozed, subdivided and suburbanized
    without a trace.

    I’ll never forget camping under the bark shelter. We set a pole frame
    against a log and covered the works with slabs of cedar bark. There
    was a carpet of moss for a floor. It was snug as a bug in a rug, for a
    while. Peeling that bark must have awakened every bug in that log. No
    one noticed the bugs once the skunk showed up.

    When we got older, we wanted to camp in Olympic National Park. If the
    millions of tourists who visit National Park each year built a bark
    shelter, they could have the place clear-cut in no time. It was time
    to go hi-tech. I had to get a tent.

    There many fine ones on the market. They all shared one thing in
    common: They leaked. A leaky tarp was cheaper than a leaky tent and we
    were on a budget.

    As luck would have it, mom got a new shower curtain on the last day of
    school. I got the old one. It was perfect for camping with little
    holes around the edges you could tie string to and batten down the
    hatches when the bad weather hit.

    I’ll never forget that first and last night under the shower curtain.
    We’d slogged into a high mountain lake right when the ice was off.
    That was the best time to fish but the wind was blowing so hard it
    made casting impossible.

    I made a lean-to out of the shower curtain. It lasted until the wind
    picked up, howling across a snowfield. I wrapped up in that shower
    curtain and waited until dawn.

    Back then summer vacation wasn’t all just camping and fishing.
    Children were considered farm machinery. There were many fine farm
    careers to choose from, and I couldn’t wait get started.

    Picking strawberries seemed like easy money, to start out early on a
    summer morning, gorging down an endless row of perfectly ripe berries.
    That was strawberry heaven, until your gut hurt so bad you could not
    walk upright, which started the endless trips to the outhouse where
    you spotted a fellow sucker-puncher from school, which started the
    berry fight.

    That’s where you had to be careful. You could get fired for berry
    fights. Once you got fired, there was no more dough for the things you
    really needed for a happy childhood, like illegal fireworks and
    fishing gear. This was the bad old days before enlightened parents
    gave their kids credits cards to manage their money.

    So you didn’t want to get caught throwing berries even at somebody who
    was asking for it by throwing berries at you. No. Revenge could wait.
    There would be many trips to the outhouse those first couple of days
    of berry picking until you were so sick of eating berries you’d just
    as soon chew on a dirt clod.

    As luck would have it, the boss kept all the boys picking together
    where he could keep an eye on them. No matter what, the other guy’s
    row of berries always seemed to be a little riper with a few more of
    the really big strawberries that could fill up your boxes faster. It
    was against the rules to pick on another picker’s row, but nobody said
    anything about swapping boxes with them.

    Just for fun, I liked to exchange a specially prepared “sucker-box”
    with my friend while he was busy in the outhouse. That was a box of
    rocks covered with a thin layer of camouflage berries. It was a dirty
    trick but my friend had it coming. We both did.

    As the day in the berry field wore on, your back began to ache from
    the constant strain of bending. Your knees were shot from crawling
    down the endless rows. You only got paid for the berries you picked
    and if you ate all the berries you picked you paid in many ways.
    Gastric distress that kept you dashing for the outhouse was the bad
    news. The good news was it was probably the only shade in the field.

    After what seemed like all day, it was quitting time. The pickers
    lined up for their pay, but my pay was short. It seemed I had a box of
    rocks in my berries. I’d been sucker-boxed!
    I went on to pick many other crops after that — berries, beans and peas.

    Then, regular as rain, a magic thing would happen every summer:
    Grandma would come for a visit.

    I had a fishing Grandma. When she retired to go fishing, the trout
    population took a severe hit. She had a flame-red Valiant with a big
    V-8 and a push-button automatic transmission. It had plenty of
    get-up-and-go and a trunk big enough to hold enough supplies for an
    expedition. It could take several people to help unload the fiesta
    cake, 24-hour salad, cookies, oranges, grapes and more from the vast
    trunk.

    Her motto was, “You should never give up an opportunity for an outing
    or a trip.” She believed, among other things, that cherries should be
    canned with the pits taken out. Embroidering pillow slips and quilting
    on Tuesdays keeps your fingers nimble. The cookie jar should always be
    full and it is perfectly acceptable for growing boys to eat a whole
    pie. Her banana crème pie was a monument to the culinary arts. She did
    not skimp on the butter.

    I could hardly wait for Grandma to show up for her yearly clamming and
    fishing trip. When fishing with her, you didn’t go around looking for
    pop bottles to turn in for money for treats, no. Grandma Neal not only
    had the classiest ride in the county, she had plenty of cash to go
    with it. We’d hit the road for the beach at low tide and dig a washtub
    of clams then go out for burgers in a little shack right on the beach.

    Once Grandma got her fill of clams, we’d go fishing in the Elwha, a
    legendary trout stream in its day. We’d drive up the Olympic Hot
    Springs road and fish the holes along the road.

    There is some fast water in that stretch. I was fishing downstream
    from Grandma when she tumbled into the river. I tried to help as she
    went bobbing by, but just then I hooked a 12-inch rainbow on my
    Herter’s spinner. Grandma made it out okay though.

    After that Grandma Neal dropped us off along the river while she took
    a rest. We’d come back to the Valiant for lunch with a couple limits
    of trout. A Grandma Neal shore lunch was a banquet fit for a king.
    After lunch we’d head out for another limit while Grandma took a nap.
    We’d fish until we ran out of worms and head back to the Valiant with
    another basket of trout, then style back home for a fish fry.

    Back at school I once bragged I had “the fishing-est” Grandma there
    was. Those were fighting words at the time.

    “Your Grandma doesn’t fish,” a punk who used to be my friend said.
    “She just sits in the car.”

    He should know. Grandma took him fishing the summer before. He didn’t
    understand a fishing Grandma. She didn’t have to fish. That’s what the
    grandkids were for. They were all fishing fools. She could park that
    Valiant almost anywhere in the Western United States, turn the
    grandkids loose and go home with a basket of trout. That’s a fishing
    Grandma in my book.

    The good old days were too good to last. I turned into a worthless
    teenager tumbling down the slippery slope to the dark side. I started
    fly-fishing. Before long I was too busy to go fishing with Grandma
    Neal. She started going to Reno. She said it had a beautiful cathedral
    and playing cards kept your mind sharp. She had always believed in
    supporting the local bingo games. It might have affected her health.
    She only lived to be 100. When she died, the trout population in
    heaven took a severe hit.

    Grandma was a wise and spiritual woman. She walked to church every day
    until she was 97. She once told me to stay in school because no one
    could take an education away from you. Those words stayed with me.

    Staying in school required my participation in a number of careers
    that no longer exist. I got a job cutting the logs out of creeks. Now
    we put them back in. I was a member of the Shingleweavers Union
    working in a shingle mill. Now there is no more union. I cut off fish
    heads, trolled for salmon, cut shake bolts.

    I got a job thinning trees in the Forks Burn up on Bonidu Mountain.
    These baby trees were growing amid the stumps of the big old growth
    they had logged. We thinned out the young Douglas fir, Pacific silver
    fir and hemlock so they would grow faster.

    Years later I was snooping through a timber cruising notebook of my
    now deceased father. By chance I opened to the page to where he was
    cruising the Douglas fir, silver fir and hemlock timber on Bonidu
    Mountain. Out of the millions of acres in the working forest, we
    worked the same land. I thought that was pretty cool.

    Eventually I graduated from college with a degree in history. I got a
    job with the government identifying and locating historic sites,
    artifacts and objects on the Olympic Peninsula. It began a life-long
    study that continued after the job ran out, to the present day. It was
    the late ‘70s. The sons and daughters of the original pioneers of the
    Olympic Peninsula were still alive. I interviewed these people, and we
    became fast friends.

    There was Lena Fletcher, daughter of John Huelsdonk, the “Iron Man of
    the Hoh,” and his granddaughter, Missy Barlow. There was Kate
    Flaherty, daughter of Chris Morganroth; Boston Charlie’s niece, Lavern
    Hepfner; and old Abe Cameron’s kid, Emerson Boone Cameron. He was
    known as Boone. I met him through Harry Reed, who had hunted, fished
    and trapped the Dungeness country with Boone for 40 years or so. Harry
    must have been in his 70s. Boone was 80-something. What Harry and
    Boone didn’t know about the Dungeness wasn’t worth knowing.

    The Dungeness was a haunted valley of abandoned farms, mines,
    distilleries, and logging and hunting camps connected with trails,
    roads, railroads and lookouts that have long since disappeared. I
    thought I would write about it someday, so here goes.

    Harry and Boone were the last of the mountain men, self-described
    reprobates and moonshine connoisseurs. They homesteaded, hunted,
    fished, trapped, logged and guided decades before I was born. They
    were living historic monuments.

    My job was to remember everything they said. I had to remember it. I
    didn’t have a tape recorder. I couldn’t write it down. That’s
    impossible while you’re driving on a muddy road where one slip will
    put you in a quagmire or off the side of the mountain while your
    guides are arguing over which way to turn and the names of every
    creek, hollow and knob along the way.

    Geographic place names are a record of the past. Graveyard Spit was
    named after a massacre. Whiskey Flats was named after the town’s
    leading industry. Wildcat Creek was named after one of Boone’s old
    girlfriends. That’s what Harry said anyway.

    We were road hunting at the time since both of the guys were too old
    to walk very far. Harry had his Long Tom, a single shot 12-gauge,
    which, together with Boone’s lever-action rifle, looked like a pile of
    scrap iron, but that’s how they killed their game. Boone said he
    killed two elk in his life, big five-point bulls. One was shot at the
    head of Lost River and the other was up the Lillian River. Boone
    figured that might be in Olympic National Park these days, and I said
    they were.

    Boone and his father, Abe, hunted and guided up in the Olympics before
    there was a park. His father had named Cameron Creek and named the
    valley it flowed through “Boone Valley.” Boone offered to draw me a
    map of his old hunting country with all their cabins and trails in his
    own style, with the letters backwards so I would have to look at it in
    a mirror to read it. I thought a map like that would be worth a
    fortune just for all the antique whiskey bottles you’d find around
    where the cabins stood, but Boone died before he drew that map. It
    became a real problem for my research. All my friends were dying of
    old age.

    One day when we were driving up the river to go fishing, Harry said he
    was having a stroke. I turned the truck around. Harry seemed surprised
    we were going to the hospital. He said not to worry, the stroke
    wouldn’t hit until the next day.

    It was February. The temperature was in the low 30s with rain just
    turning to snow, perfect steelhead weather. The Dungeness was loaded
    with steelhead. Harry said he could probably catch our limit in an
    hour. I drove up the river feeling like an accessory to
    fishing-assisted suicide.

    Harry didn’t even own a tackle box. He carried a wicker creel. Inside
    he had a few leaders tied up, some split shot and a jar of eggs cured
    in sugar and salt. Once in a while Harry would get fancy.

    “We started tying yarn on our leaders after the War,” he said. That
    would be the big one, WWII. The rest of Harry’s gear looked like it
    had been through the war. The guides on his rod and his reel were held
    on with electrical tape. He would strip out some line and swing his
    little glob of caviar out into the river, usually less than 10 feet
    from shore. Harry caught both our limits before I got my fancy gear
    untangled.

    “You have to feel the bite,” Harry said. That hurt. A fishermen’s ego
    can be as delicate as the most fragile ecosystem. Harry had a 50-year
    steelhead fishing head start on me. I thought it would be only fair if
    he let me catch a fish once in a while.

    Still there was more to a hunting or fishing trip with Harry than
    hunting and fishing. It was a treasure hunt. Harry brought a metal
    detector. He found all kinds metal tools and stove parts buried under
    the sod of long-abandoned homesteads, along with the remains of the
    Olympic Mountain Moonshiner. This was an endangered species, which,
    like the 100-pound salmon and the Olympic timber wolf, went extinct
    shortly after they were “discovered.”

    The moonshiners left a network of trails and camps that ran from the
    tidewater dock on the Dungeness far into the mountains packing grain,
    sugar, yeast and dynamite to supply the many thirsty mines, logging
    camps, fishing lodges, hunting camps, bawdy houses, dance halls and
    homesteads that used to populate the last frontier.

    In 1897, much of the moonshiner’s home range was declared a national
    monument to protect the elk. This brought law to the Olympic
    Peninsula. The year 1920 brought Prohibition, which, as Will Rogers
    said, was “better than no liquor at all.”

    There were conflicts. “Dodger Bender” manned the fire lookout on the
    mountain that now bears his name, Dodger Point up the Elwha River. The
    story goes that Dodger discovered a still and got knifed and killed by
    a moonshiner.

    The rich farmlands of the Dungeness provided the grain that, when
    combined with pure Olympic mountain spring water, could supply the
    20,000 sailors of the U.S. Pacific Squadron with refreshments. The
    squadron had spent summers on maneuvers in Port Angeles Harbor ever
    since 1895 when Old Admiral Beardsley spent so much time fishing Lake
    Crescent they named the trout after him. For the next 40 years,
    thousands of thirsty sailors enriched the social scene of the
    Peninsula. That was until 1933 when the do-gooders ended Prohibition
    and killed the moonshiner’s market.

    In 1938, the National Park took over, putting the last nail in the
    moonshiner’s coffin. Today the remains of the moonshiners are not much
    to look at. Often there is just a collection of metal barrel hoops
    sticking out of the forest floor. Other times you might see an old
    10-gallon milk can. These were “borrowed” from dairy farms in the
    valley. Harry would find what was left with his metal detector.

    Many of these pioneer remains were soon obliterated by a logging
    industry that had no appreciation for cultural resources. Logging was
    really taking off at the time.

    By the 1970s, the Japanese post-war economy had developed to the point
    where they bought American wood. We shipped what was the finest old
    growth timber on the planet to the Orient as raw logs. Up to 300
    truckloads of logs came into Port Angeles every day to be shipped
    overseas. Meanwhile, American mills were being forced out of business
    from a lack of wood.

    By the 1980s, we had logged and burned the last remaining watersheds
    of the Olympic Peninsula from the saltwater to the National Park
    boundary. The Japanese economy crashed along with the logging
    industry. My government job ran out. I became a fishing guide for
    salmon and steelhead and have fished ever since.

    There have been many changes to the Olympic Peninsula since I started
    guiding. The salmon, elk and timber for which this land was famous is
    mostly rare, endangered or just plain gone. Still what is left of our
    rivers represents the best of the last or the last of the best salmon
    and steelhead fishing in the country. Fishing may be bad and getting
    worse, but you can still have an awesome day on the river. Which may
    prove the old theory: The worse fishing gets, the more you need a
    guide.

    Pat Neal is a fishing guide

    He can be reached at 360-683-9867 or by email via patnealwild life@gmail.com.


  • Elwha Supplemental Impact Statement?

    Note: EPA no longer updates this information, but it may be useful as a reference or resource.

    The installation of Scott Pruitt, to run the Environmental Protection Agency, sued the agency he intends to lead more than a dozen times as Oklahoma attorney general, reinforces expectations.

    “I have no doubt that Scott will return the EPA to its core objectives,” said Republican Senator James Inhofe, also of Oklahoma, adding the agency had been guilty of “federal overreach, unlawful rule making, and duplicative red tape,”

    DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    National Park Service

    DATED: JULY 9, 2002. Elwha Ecosystem Restoration Implementation; Olympic National Park; Clallam and Jefferson Counties, WA; Notice of Intent To Prepare a SUPPLEMENTAL Environmental Impact Statement FILED 9-11-02 

    Note: EPA no longer updates this information, but it may be useful as a reference or resource.

    (FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS, SEE ELWHA RIVER WATER QUALITY MITIGATION PROJECT

    PLANNING REPORT AT www.nps.gov/olym/elwha/home.htm).

     Mar 30 2017, Olympic National Park WE CAN’T FIND THAT PAGE….

    ——————————————————————————-

    DATED: JULY 9, 2002. MITIGATION PROJECT ISSUES?   IT’S IMPACT ON VISITORS? AND POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON VISITORS? FILED 9-11-02 

    Water quality or water supply mitigation issues that will be analyzed in the SEIS include impacts of rebuilding the existing rock diversion structure on riparian vegetation, wildlife, water quality and fish; land use related impacts of building permanent water treatment facilities, such as removal of vegetation and soil, use of heavy equipment to build the facilities and its impact on wildlife or VISITORS,

    VISITORS? WOW, IS THAT LIKE AN ECONOMIC IMPACT STATEMENT ON CLALLAM COUNTY TOURISM?

    and hazards of using chlorine and other chemicals required for treatment.    Other environmental issues not related to water quality or supply include providing access to Morse Creek and other tributaries for fisheries protection during dam removal, access to seed stock and protection of young plants in revegetating reservoir lands, changes in driving routes for trucks disposing of rubble, or noise of an onsite rubble crushing operation and its potential effects on wildlife and VISITORS.

    VISITORS? WOW, IS THAT LIKE AN ECONOMIC IMPACT STATEMENT ON CLALLAM COUNTY TOURISM?

    VISITORS? LIKE AN IMPACT STATEMENT ONP INHOLDERS?

    ——————————————————

    Jun 28, 2011

    Olympic National Park mea culpa: ‘Inholder’ blocked from family property

    www.peninsuladailynews.com/…/olympic-national-park-mea-culpa-8216-inholder-82…

    Jun 28, 2011 – Pearl Rains Hewett stands at a blockade on Olympic Hot Springs Road in Olympic National Park on Monday. — Photo by Chris …

    ————————————————————-

    FISH BEFORE PEOPLE

    Elwha River Fish Restoration Plan – National Park Service

    https://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/upload/Elwha-River-Fish-Management-Plan.pdf

    2008 – ‎Related articles

    THE SITE WILL HELP PRESERVE AND RESTORE ELWHA RIVER CHINNOOK POPULATIONS BY PROVIDING SAFE HAVEN FOR 200,000 YEARLING SMOLTS.

    —————————————————————-

    DATED: JULY 9, 2002.

    Dam removal was determined to be the preferred option for restoration, and the 1996 EIS also identified a desired suite of actions to remove the dams. As a step towards accomplishing these objectives, Congress directed purchase of the dams (which occurred in February 2000 for $29.5 million, as stipulated by Pub. L. 102-495).

    ————————————————————————-

    AS A DELEGATED EIS, THE OFFICIAL RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FINAL DECISION IS THE REGIONAL DIRECTOR, PACIFIC WEST REGION;

     SUBSEQUENTLY THE OFFICIAL RESPONSIBLE FOR IMPLEMENTATION WOULD BE THE SUPERINTENDENT, OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK.

     DATED: JULY 9, 2002.JOHN J. REYNOLDS,REGIONAL DIRECTOR, PACIFIC WEST REGION.[FR DOC. 02-23124 FILED 9-11-02; 8:45 AM]BILLING CODE 4310-70-P

    (FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS, SEE ELWHA RIVER WATER QUALITY MITIGATION PROJECT

    PLANNING REPORT AT www.nps.gov/olym/elwha/home.htm).

     Mar 30 2017 WE CAN’T FIND THAT PAGE….

    Written comments may be delivered by fax to: 360/565-1325; via e-mail to: Brian_Winter@nps.gov; or via postal mail or hand delivery during normal business hours to: Elwha Restoration Project Office, SEIS Comments, 826 East Front Street, Suite A, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

    ———————————————————————-

    Timeline of the Elwha 1992 to Present – Olympic National Park (U.S. …

    https://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/…/timeline-of-the-elwha-1992-to-present.htm

    THE SITE WILL HELP PRESERVE AND RESTORE ELWHA RIVER CHINNOOK POPULATIONS BY PROVIDING SAFE HAVEN FOR 200,000 YEARLING SMOLTS. … Before his death in 2007, Albright pioneered propagation methods for many plants native to the Northwest.

    ———————————————————————

    Elwha River Fish Restoration Plan – National Park Service

    https://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/upload/Elwha-River-Fish-Management-Plan.pdf

    2008 – ‎Related articles

    PURSUANT TO THE ELWHA RIVER ECOSYSTEM AND FISHERIES RES- TORATION ACT …… 200,000. MORSE CREEK. YEARLING SMOLTS. ON-SITE. 180,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 …… Spawning ground surveys of live or dead fish and redds can then be.

    —————————————————————————

    Apr 15, 2013

    ELWHA RIVER WATER QUALITY  200,000  DEAD SMOLT

    SEABURY BLAIR JR. | Elwha too clogged for fish to live – Kitsap Sun

    www.kitsapsun.com/sports/columnists/seabury-blair/356167261.html

    Apr 15, 2013 – … AS MANY AS 200000 CHINOOK SALMON WERE KILLED IN WHAT HAS TO BE ONE OF THE … HATCHERY OFFICIALS REPORTED SEEING HUNDREDS OF DEAD SMOLTS LINING THE … For almost 15 miles, the Elwha River carves through a century’s worth of … ELWHA RIVER WATER QUALITY  

    JUL 12, 2013 LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE’S HATCHERY

    200, 000  MORE DEAD SMOLT

    400,000 TOTAL DEAD HATCHERY SMOLT…

    —————————————————————–

    The Danger of Putting All Your Eggs in the Hatchery Basket — Wild …

    wildfishconservancy.org › About › Press › Press Clips

    JUL 12, 2013 – ROUGHLY 200,000 HATCHERY COHO SALMON AND 2000 STEELHEAD, RESULTING FROM A PUMP FAILURE AT THE LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE’S HATCHERY ON THE ELWHA RIVER. …

     SPRING  Apr 15, 2013 THANKS TO MISTAKEN TIMING OF LARGE RELEASE OF SMOLTS AT ONE TIME … PRODUCTION LOST (200,000 DEAD) DUE TO MALFUNCTION OF HATCHERY WATER PUMP …

    The tragedy is: this production could have occurred with much less risk with natural spawning left to the river where fish make their own decisions regarding spawning destination and time, and juveniles determine their own window for outmigration.  Instead these fish have been hi-jacked by the continued belief in hatcheries rather than the proven success story of wild fish recolonization for thousands of years and resulting diversity that hedges its bets against the whims of nature’s unpredictable events.  And we paid $16 million to create this Elwha hatchery fiasco plus further annual investments in taking fish from the river and subjecting them to the persistent belief in hatcheries that is counter to the science — further evidence of the tragic disconnect of science from policy, the latter continually driven by the politics of popular beliefs.

    http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20130711/news/307119990

     ————————————————————————————

     (FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS, SEE ELWHA RIVER WATER QUALITY MITIGATION PROJECT

    PLANNING REPORT AT www.nps.gov/olym/elwha/home.htm).

    WE CAN’T FIND THAT PAGE….

    THE SEIS WILL ALSO ANALYZE CHANGES UNRELATED TO WATER QUALITY

    MITIGATION WHERE APPLICABLE.

    One of these changes is a re-evaluation of

    options to mitigate impacts to septic systems on the Lower Elwha

    Klallam Reservation. Many of the septic systems in the lower lying

    parts of the Reservation may become ineffective when the river level

    and associated groundwater table rises as a result of river channel

    aggradation following dam removal.

    In addition to the points summarized above, further detail has been added to the revegetation plan for the areas currently inundated by the reservoirs; thus, potential impacts of

    actions associated with such revegetation will be addressed.

    ———————————————————–

    Full unedited text

    DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    National Park Service Elwha Ecosystem Restoration Implementation;

    Olympic National Park; Clallam and Jefferson Counties, WA;

    Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement [Federal Register: September 12, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 177)][Notices][Page 57834-57836]From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov][DOCID:fr12se02-94] SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and its cooperating agencies are undertaking a conservation planning and environmental impact analysis process intended to supplement the 1996 Elwha River Ecosystem Restoration Implementation final environmental impact statement (1996 EIS).

    Two dams, built in the early 1900s, block the river and limit anadromous fish to the lowest 4.9 river miles. The 1996 EIS is the second of two environmental impact statements that examined how best to restore the Elwha River ecosystem and native anadromous fishery in Olympic National Park. Dam removal was determined to be the preferred option for restoration, and the 1996 EIS also identified a desired suite of actions to remove the dams. As a step towards accomplishing these objectives, Congress directed purchase of the dams (which occurred in February 2000 for $29.5 million, as stipulated by Pub. L. 102-495). However, release of sediment from behind the dams would result in sometimes severe impacts to water quality or to the reliability of supply to downstream users during the dam removal impact period of about 3-5 years, which the 1996 EIS proposed mitigating through a series of specific measures (see below).

    Subsequently, new research and changes unrelated to the implementation project have emerged. Therefore, the primary purpose of this Supplemental EIS (SEIS) will be to identify and analyze potential impacts of a new set of water quality and supply related mitigation measures.

    Background     Elwha Dam was built in 1911, and Glines Canyon Dam in 1925, limiting anadromous fish to the lowest 4.9 miles of river (blocking access to more than 70 miles of Elwha River mainstream and tributary habitat). The two dams and their associated reservoirs have also inundated and degraded important riverine and terrestrial habitat and severely affected fisheries habitat through increased temperatures, reduced nutrients, reduced spawning gravels downstream, and other changes. Consequently, salmon and steelhead populations in the river have been considerably reduced or eliminated, and the river ecosystem within Olympic National Park significantly and adversely altered.

    In 1992, Congress enacted the Elwha River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act (PL 102-495) directing the Secretary of the Interior to fully restore the Elwha river ecosystem and native anadromous fisheries, while at the same time protecting users of the river’s water from adverse impacts associated with dam removal. The records of decision associated with this process indicated removal of both dams was needed to fully restore the ecosystem. However, impacts to water quality and supply will result from release of sediments, which have accumulated behind the dams.

    The 1996 EIS proposed and analyzed mitigation measures to protect water quality and ensure supply for each of the major downstream users. These users included the city of Port Angeles’ municipal and industrial consumers, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe’s fish hatchery, the state chinook salmon rearing channel, and the Dry Creek Water Association. Many private wells along the river could also be affected, but mitigation proposed for these users would remain substantially the same.    Currently, surface water from a rock fill diversion and intake pipe at river mile 3.3 supplies the city’s industrial clients and the state rearing channel. Mitigation to protect the city’s industrial customers described in the 1996 EIS included the installation of an infiltration gallery to collect water filtered from the riverbed and open-channel treatment with flocculants, chemicals and polymers during dam removal. The city’s municipal customers are supplied with a subsurface Ranney collector on the east-side of the river at river mile 2.8. To maintain water yield, the 1996 EIS [[Page 57835]] proposed a second Ranney collector be built on the river’s west-side, opposite the current collector. A temporary “package” treatment plant to filter water from the Ranney wells would have been operational during dam removal.

    The rearing channel would have been closed during dam removal and chinook production transferred to another state facility.    The tribal hatchery at river mile 1 will be central in protecting and producing Elwha anadromous fish for restoration following dam removal. Water for the hatchery is currently provided through wells and a shallow infiltration gallery. Measures described to protect hatchery water during dam removal included the expansion of the gallery to ensure supply and drilling of two new wells to provide clean groundwater for dilution.

    Dry Creek Water Association (DCWA) currently meets the needs of its members through groundwater wells. These wells would be subject to an increased frequency of flooding following dam removal, as well as increased sediment and mobilization of iron and manganese. The 1996 EIS analyzed two options for DCWA–connection to the city’s water distribution system, or providing additional protection from flooding for the existing DCWA system and treating on site with filtration and chlorination.

    Since December 1996 (when the most recent record of decision was signed), the U.S. Department of the Interior (including Bureau of Reclamation) and its cooperating agencies (including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe) have continued studying and refining elements of the selected alternative. As a result, they have found better solutions for protecting water quality and water supply during and following dam removal. In addition, changes in user needs have come about as a result of factors unrelated to the project.

    For example, chinook salmon and bull trout have both been listed as threatened since 1997, resulting in the requirement to keep the state rearing facility open during dam removal.

    Also, the city of Port Angeles must now meet new standards for the treatment of its municipal supplies. In addition, an industrial customer (Rayonier) which required very high quality water for its operation has since closed.    As a result of these and other changes, the agencies are pursuing an option of building permanent water treatment facilities with varying levels of treatment depending on the ultimate use of the water

    (for additional details, see Elwha River Water Quality Mitigation Project Planning Report at www.nps.gov/olym/elwha/home.htm).  The locations and types of diversions may also change because water collected from the city’s Ranney well is no longer considered to be purely groundwater, but is highly connected to the river and so must be treated as a surface supply.

    In addition, problems associated with subsurface intakes during the 3-5 year dam removal impact period may now outweigh the benefits. These problems include possible clogging and reduced yields, increased costs of providing flood protection, and increased environmental impacts associated with installing and maintaining subsurface structures in or very near the river. Sources of “true” groundwater, which are not so closely connected to the river have been investigated, but do not exist in the quantities required. This leaves surface water as a more attractive option. An alternative of replacing the existing intake structure will therefore be analyzed in the SEIS.

    Feasibility studies indicate surface water could be treated and used for the city’s industrial customer, in combination with well water for the state’s rearing facility and the Lower Elwha Klallam tribal hatchery, and as a backup for the city’s municipal customers. It may also be evaluated as an option to supply DCWA customers.

    The SEIS will also analyze changes unrelated to water quality mitigation where applicable. One of these changes is a re-evaluation of options to mitigate impacts to septic systems on the Lower Elwha Klallam Reservation. Many of the septic systems in the lower lying parts of the Reservation may become ineffective when the river level and associated groundwater table rises as a result of river channel aggradation following dam removal. Although the 1996 EIS examined a community mounding system, the number of residents living in the valley part of the Reservation has now increased. The SEIS will evaluate other options which are technically, economically, or environmentally preferable in light of these changes. At this time, the Tribe is considering a variety of options, including individual onsite systems with pressurized pumps, small group treatment options, offsite treatment by others, or combining with other valley residents (who would not be affected by dam removal) to create a community treatment system.

    Since the release of the 1996 EIS, two species of fish cited for restoration have been listed as threatened, and the NPS has worked with USFWS and NMFS staff to further address these species during and following dam removal. Keeping the rearing channel open for chinook salmon production and modifying road culverts within the park to provide access for bull trout to additional tributary habitat are examples of some of the additional actions that the SEIS will examine.

    Environmental Issues     Updated and additional information relevant to decision-making will be presented in the SEIS. In addition to the points summarized above, further detail has been added to the revegetation plan for the areas currently inundated by the reservoirs; thus, potential impacts of actions associated with such revegetation will be addressed. The 1996 EIS envisioned using one or more of nine solid waste disposal areas for rubble and other materials. Some of these may no longer be available, new sites might be added, or recycling of concrete may be economically preferable now.    Water quality or water supply mitigation issues that will be analyzed in the SEIS include impacts of rebuilding the existing rock diversion structure on riparian vegetation, wildlife, water quality and fish; land use related impacts of building permanent water treatment facilities, such as removal of vegetation and soil, use of heavy equipment to build the facilities and its impact on wildlife or visitors, and hazards of using chlorine and other chemicals required for treatment.    Other environmental issues not related to water quality or supply include providing access to Morse Creek and other tributaries for fisheries protection during dam removal, access to seed stock and protection of young plants in revegetating reservoir lands, changes in driving routes for trucks disposing of rubble, or noise of an onsite rubble crushing operation and its potential effects on wildlife and visitors.

    Scoping/Comments     Public scoping for the SEIS will conclude 30-days from the date of publication of this notice. All interested individuals, groups, and agencies are encouraged to provide information relevant to the design, construction, location, or potential environmental effects of desired measures noted above. Please limit comments to the proposal as described in this notice, since prior decisions to restore the ecosystem and anadromous fisheries through dam removal, and selection of the River Erosion alternative as the dam removal scenario, are beyond the scope of environmental impact analysis targeted in the SEIS. [[Page 57836]]

    Additional information and periodic updates will be available at the Web site noted above or by contacting the Elwha Restoration Project Office at (360) 565-1320. All comments must be postmarked or transmitted no later than 30 days from the publication date of this notice; as soon as this date is determined it will be announced on the Web site noted.

    Written comments may be delivered by fax to: 360/565-1325; via e-mail to: Brian_Winter@nps.gov; or via postal mail or hand delivery during normal business hours to: Elwha Restoration Project Office, SEIS Comments, 826 East Front Street, Suite A, Port Angeles, WA 98362.    If individuals submitting comments request that their name or/and address be withheld from public disclosure, it will be honored to the extent allowable by law. Such requests must be stated prominently in the beginning of the comments. There also may be circumstances wherein the NPS will withhold a respondent’s identity as allowable by law. As always: NPS will make available to public inspection all submissions from organizations or businesses and from persons identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations and businesses; and, anonymous comments may not be considered. Decision

    The SEIS will be prepared in accord with all applicable laws and regulations, including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR parts 1500-1508), and the NPS Management Policies (2001) and NEPA guidelines (Director’s Order 12). A 60-day public review of the Draft will be initiated upon its release, which at this time is expected in early 2003; then subsequently a Final will be prepared. Issuance of both documents will be announced via local and regional press, direct mailings, on the Web site noted above, and through the Federal Register.

    AS A DELEGATED EIS, THE OFFICIAL RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FINAL DECISION IS THE REGIONAL DIRECTOR, PACIFIC WEST REGION;

    SUBSEQUENTLY THE OFFICIAL RESPONSIBLE FOR IMPLEMENTATION WOULD BE THE SUPERINTENDENT, OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK.

    DATED: JULY 9, 2002.

    JOHN J. REYNOLDS,REGIONAL DIRECTOR,

    PACIFIC WEST REGION.[FR DOC. 02-23124

    FILED 9-11-02; 8:45 AM]BILLING CODE 4310-70-P


  • ONP Elwha River Inholders

    Olympic National Park Elwha River Inholders that hold out…

    AND,  THE  133  ELWHA PARK RECREATIONAL INHOLDERS  CAMPSITES THAT WERE WASHED OUT.

    AND SOLD OUT AS WILLING SELLERS.

    The full list of  133 names and dates are below

    There are many tragic stories of private property owners who have lost their private property to the National Park thugs.  Strangely these tales seldom see the light of day.

    SOMETHINGS HAPPEN THAT MUST BE DOCUMENTED, TO BE REMEMBERED

    On Sat, Jul 28, 2012 at 11:33 AM, pearl hewett <phew@wavecable.com> wrote:

    Destroyed Inholder  Private Elwha Recreational Sites

    Frankie White Called me from Oregon yesterday. She owned one of the 134 INHOLDER private Elwha Recreational lots 25 years ago when it was destroyed by ONP. She called it the FLOOD.

    The NPS/ONP gave Frankie three choices on her private property.

    1. Sell you lot to us now for full appraised value.
    2. Sell it to us now, use it for 5 years and we will give you 1/2 of the appraised value.
    3. DO NOTHING and we will take it by immanent domain.

    The White family had enjoyed the ONP private Inholder campsite for 14 years.

    My Dad, George C. Rains Sr. told her not to sell, that the ONP could not take it.

    Their family did not have money to fight. They did not know HOW to fight the ONP.

    They were afraid, they didn’t know what to do, and they sold their site to ONP.

    Frankie said, “I cried and cried, BUT THE ONP LEFT US NO CHOICE, so we sold it to them”

    ———————————————————-

    SOMETHINGS HAPPEN THAT MUST BE DOCUMENTED, TO BE REMEMBERED

    excerpt from

    [PDF]Conspiracy Exposed – Citizen Review Online

    www.citizenreviewonline.org/2011/Jul/George_Rains_Statements.pdf
    ————————————————————–

    Jack Del Gussi, John H. Lewis and I created the finest recreational campground facilities the Elwha River has ever known. We subdivided and developed campsites with underground electric power, water system and good roads and restrooms.

    In the course of our development I noticed a small breach through a narrow strip of land on the south of the big island which is owned by the park. I could foresee a lot of damage if something was not done to protect our property below and the Olympic Hot Springs Road.

    I contacted Del Hur Industries to get an estimate on what it would cost to plug the breach and put a small rock dike to prevent further damage to our property and the road.

    After getting an estimate I contacted the park people and they would do nothing to help remedy the situation. I also offered to provide free of cost all rip rap from our rock quarry on Little River.

    The problem was ignored. Finally sometime later the river came up high enlarging the breach, washing out a section of the Olympic Hot Springs Road and cut a channel through our development and took out our bridge……

    To this day they have done nothing to remedy the threat and a good portion of our property was destroyed through their sheer negligence. The National Park has no respect  for private property rights and ownership.

    ———————————————-

    MAR 29, 2017  To this day they have done nothing to remedy the threat to the Olympic Hot Spring Road, our access to our inholder property is gone and a good portion of our property is still being destroyed through their sheer negligence. The National Park has no respect  for private property rights and ownership.

    ——————————————–

    Destroyed Inholder  Private Elwha Recreational Sites

    There are many tragic stories of private property owners who have lost their private property to the National Park thugs.  Strangely these tales seldom see the light of day.

    WAS A MEMBER OF YOUR FAMILY “A WILLING SELLER”  LIKE FRANKIE WHITE, TO THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK ?

    INHOLDERS ELWHA PARK RECREATIONAL CAMPSITES
    Hand written sales by George C. Rains Sr.

    Dated Sept. 22, 1970

    Hand written income by George C. Rains Sr.

    ending Dec. 1973

    TOTAL CAMPSITES (133) Documented
    OLYMPIC HOT SPRINGS ROAD CLALLAM COUNTY WA
    NUMBER OF CAMPSITES SITES DESTROYED BY OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK?
    NUMBER OF DESTROYED SITES PURCHASED BY OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK?
    OWNER PURCHASE PRICE
    1 Donald Salonen $2,500.00
    2 Peters, Jones and Salonen $2,500.00
    3 Peters and Jones $2,500.00
    4 McGinnis $2,500.00
    5 Mahoney $2,500.00
    6 Woodley $2,500.00
    7 Wenko $2,500.00
    8 James Arnold $2,500.00
    9 Cedon and Koski $2,500.00
    10 Louise Colby $2,500.00
    11 Adeline Knopman $2,500.00
    12 Uklenbott $2,500.00
    13 Donald Bray $2,500.00
    14 Adams $2,500.00
    15 Ainsworth $2,500.00
    16 Correia $2,500.00
    17 McDonald $2,500.00
    18 Gilbert Spenser $2,500.00
    19 McEachern $2,500.00
    20 Hutchinson $2,500.00
    21 Abbot $2,500.00
    22 Purvis $2,000.00
    23 McDonald $2,000.00
    24 Rylandar $2,500.00
    25 Rylandar $2,500.00
    26 Haggerty $2,500.00
    27 Croven- Byers $2,500.00
    28 Byers $2,500.00
    29 Karl Gustfason $2,500.00
    30 Anton $2,500.00
    31 Mitchel $2,500.00
    32 Gregon $2,500.00
    33 Knotek $2,500.00
    34 Paulis $2,500.00
    35 Inglin and Miemyick $2,500.00
    36 Stiles $2,500.00
    37 George Rains Jr. $2,500.00
    38 rest room priceless
    39 restroom priceless
    40 Corbin Cook $2,500.00
    41 Wheeler $2,500.00
    42 Scanano $3,200.00
    43 Cargo $3,200.00
    44 Yeaw $3,200.00
    45 Loopt and Lyman $2,500.00
    46 Loopt and Lyman $2,500.00
    47 Taylor $2,500.00
    48 Scoles $2,500.00
    49 Thocker $2,500.00
    50 Hansen $2,500.00
    51 Hansen $2,500.00
    52 Buchnell $2,500.00
    53 Robert Wry $2,500.00
    54 Larsen $2,500.00
    55 Tony Masi $2,500.00
    56 Glidden $2,500.00
    57 Stefono $2,500.00
    58 Johnny Key $2,500.00
    59 Lars gustofson $2,500.00
    60 Locks Louchs $2,500.00
    61 Louchs $2,500.00
    62 Reidel $2,500.00
    63 George Rains Jr. $2,500.00
    64 Don Kono $2,500.00
    65 George Rains Sr. $2,500.00
    66 Christanson $2,500.00
    67 Lee York $2,000.00
    68 George Rains Sr $2,500.00
    69 Don Kono $2,500.00
    70 Donald Arnold $2,500.00
    71 Creten $2,500.00
    72 Harry Arnold $2,500.00
    73 Nona Rains Preston $2,500.00
    74 Grauberger $2,000.00
    75 Grauberger-George Stevens $2,000.00
    76 Nona Rains Preston $2,500.00
    77 Libby $2,000.00
    78 Christensen $2,000.00
    79 Burchnell $2,000.00
    80 Owens $2,500.00
    81 Owens $2,500.00
    82 Owens $2,500.00
    83 Waldron $2,500.00
    84 30 foot road $2,500.00
    85 23-7 and 8 $2,800.00
    ADDITIONAL SALES 1970-1973
    PAYMENTS MADE BY
    86 Chester Blevins
    87 Clarence Colby
    88 Micheal Sanders
    89 Howell
    90 Klahn
    91 Wagstaff
    92 Joe Chase
    93 Donald Brady
    94 Glen Larson
    95 Micheal Sconogo
    96 Warren Schrader
    97 Barrow Sahor
    98 Nesbit
    99 Herbert Sahor
    100 Leonard Schroeder
    101 Jack Clark
    102 Mary Knapman
    103 Austin Glidden
    104 Dorothy Wheeler
    105 Joseph Mahoney
    106 William Bucknell
    107 Leonard McDaniel
    108 Wallace Adams
    109 Dom Solomen
    110 Max Ainsworth
    111 Robert McGinnis
    112 Earl Blevines
    113 Glen Waldron
    114 Elmer Wenko
    115 Donald Reidel
    116 Norman Taylor
    117 Gilbert Spencer
    118 Bill Preston
    119 Fred Correai
    120 Bert Wall
    121 Bertha Knotek
    122 Kenneth Owens
    123 Wallace Louchs (1)
    124 Wallace Louchs (2)
    125 Russel Stark
    126 Peter Lucal
    127 Peter Busch
    128 L. Durfraine
    129 Donald Bray
    130 James Howell
    131 Landoher
    132 James Klohn
    133 Michael Gort
    134 Tom Tinklham
    135 Bert Reid

  • The New Elwha Bridge and Rest Stop?

    The New Elwha Bridge and Rest Stop?

    Who knew? What Rest Stop?

    ———————————————-

    Clallam County Code 31.06.060 Transportation policies

    www.codepublishing.com/WA/ClallamCounty/?ClallamCounty31/ClallamCounty310…

    (a) Encourage the Washington State Department of Transportation to retain all of their properties adjoining Highway 101 for future use as rest stops, scenic pullouts, roadside parks and….

    —————————————————-

     We all know now,  So, Let’s plan on it!

    The possibilities are endless

    March 7, 2017  After looking at the 2017 plans for the new Elwha bridge, I immediately saw the possibilities and an opportunity for a Clallam County rest stop on the Norm’s Resort Property on High Way 101 next to the Elwha River.

    Who’s Norm?  What’s he got to do with it?

    In 1979  Norm’s  privately owned resort gave local citizens and tourists  FREE recreational access to 10 or more acres of private land on the bank of the Elwha River. It was great, FREE public access with a  long dirt trail for walking beside the river, free fishing,  and rental boats.

    At some point in time the Norm’s Resort property of 10 or more acres was acquired by the  government and bull dozed flat.

    With the replacement of the Elwha River bridge by WSDOT  at an estimated cost of  $18 to $25 million dollar, the opportunity and possibilities for Clallam County recreational use are endless.

    Why stop with just a Clallam County rest stop on the Norm’s Resort Property? Why not add free public recreational access a walking trail and picnic area?

    WSDOT will be tearing up the entire intersection of Highway 101 and Olympic Hot Springs Road. WSDOT will be required to do  and pay for restoration on the entire disturbed area.

    Clallam County has a history of success with the rest stop area East of Port Angeles on Highway 101.

    AND, Clallam County has a history of success, rated at four and a half stars.

    Salt Creek Recreation Area – Clallam County

    SALT CREEK RECREATION AREA IS A CLALLAM COUNTY PARK

    ——————————-

    Five Generations of our Rains family have enjoyed the FREE Salt Creek beach.

    We give it A FIVE STAR RATING.

    ————————————————————————–

     Why stop with a rest stop, walking trail and picnic area on the Elwha River?

    The possibilities and opportunity for Clallam County on nearly 50 acres previously developed recreational land are endless.

    According to the Clallam County Planning Dept map, there are nearly fifty acres (50)   of previously owned developed, public recreational land located in Clallam County. It is now owned by U.S.A. It includes the Norm’s Resort property on the East side of the Elwha River and a much larger piece of land on the West side, a Public boat launch owned by WA State,  that had locked out citizens  because of the removal of the Elwha River Dams.

    At some point in time, “THEY” combined the nearly  fifty acres of  public recreational land into one parcel  number in Clallam County.

    At some point in time  it ended up being owned by the U.S.A.  in GOVERNMENT LIMBO LAND, with four options.

    OPTION ONE (1) GIVE IT TO THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK?

    The ONP has a track record  of failure, massive wash out Nov 17, 2015, Olympic Hot Springs Road emergency repairs? $4 million and they can’t even keep the road open for the gateway to the Olympics public trail access or their public view point. The National Park Service (NPS) has a $12,000,000,000.00 billion dollar backlog in maintenance.

    ——————————————

    OPTION TWO (2) GIVE IT TO WA STATE?

    What would they do with  it?

    WA State can’t even figure out how to fund basic education.

    ——————————————————–

    OPTION THREE  (3) GIVE IT TO THE TRIBES?

    The Tribes already have their fair share of tribal access on the Elwha River.

    The Clallam County, local citizens and tourists have,  FOR THE MOST PART, ZERO PUBLIC ACCESS AND ZERO PUBLIC RECREATIONAL LAND ON THE ELWHA RIVER.

    ——————————————————–

    LIMBO LAND OPTION FOUR (4) GIVE IT TO OTHER.

    I am formally submitting this option four (4) request  to our Clallam county elected officials Commissioners, Bill Peach, Randy Johnson and Mark Mozias, and DCD Mary Ellen Winborn. for their review and consideration including the Road Dept. Ross Tyler P.E. and the Parks Dept.

    Clallam County has a very long history of success providing  “USER FRIENDLY” public access for local and tourist recreational facilities.

    It is submitted, based on its merit for public access and recreational opportunity  for local citizens  and Clallam Counties economic tourism value. The estimated number of tourist visiting Clallam County every year is 300,000.

    I am also sending this email to WSDOT to start the formal dialogue for coordination between Clallam County and the State of WA, in the best interest of U.S.A. everyone.

    ————————————————————–

    And, perhaps as a reminder to WSDOT on Rest Stops and Roadside Parks.

    Clallam County Code

    www.codepublishing.com/WA/ClallamCounty/?ClallamCounty31/ClallamCounty310…

    (a) Encourage the Washington State Department of Transportation to retain all of their properties adjoining Highway 101 for future use as rest stops, scenic …

    31.06.060 Transportation policies.

    (1) Highway 101. Preserve and enhance the Highway 101 corridor for regional mobility to improve its functionality for business, area residents, tourists, nonmotorized transportation, freight and services.

    (a) Encourage the Washington State Department of Transportation to retain all of their properties adjoining Highway 101 for future use as rest stops, scenic pullouts, roadside parks and future transit pullouts.

    (b) Work with the Washington State Department of Transportation and other agencies to ensure that Highway 101 meets the goal that the corridor function regionally for the mobility of goods, services and passengers…… —————————————————————————–

    WSDOT is  in the planning stage for the new Elwha bridge replacement and what specific restoration could be provided free of charge, by the state, for a Clallam County Rest Stop, public access, a Roadside Park and other public recreational uses. 

    ——————————————————————————

    Salt Creek Recreation Area – Clallam County – WillhiteWeb.com

    www.willhiteweb.com/washington/salt_creek_recreation…/camp_hayden_288.htm

    Salt Creek Recreation Area is a Clallam County Park but is as good as any … the 518-acre Camp Hayden military reservation at Tongue Point was part of the …

    SALT CREEK RECREATION AREA IS A CLALLAM COUNTY PARK

    ————————————————————————

    Image result for As long as you are thinking about it, why not think big? ivana trump quote

    —————————————————————

    ELWHA RIVER RECREATION AREA – A CLALLAM COUNTY PARK

    Indeed, the possibilities and opportunity for Clallam County to develop public recreation facilities on nearly 50 acres of Elwha riverfront property are endless.

    The estimated number of tourist visiting Clallam County each year is 300,000.

    I know many of you will be thinking about this

    PLEASE THINK BIG!


  • Trump Picks Ryan Zinke to Head the DOI?

    Yep, Trump Picked Ryan Zinke to Head the DOI

    ZINKI’S  IDEA OF HIS DUTY AS THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AS  SECRETARY IS TO MAKE SURE THAT WE HAVE A BROAD CONSENSUS ON WHAT WE’RE DOING

    ZINKE IS A RELATIVE POLITICAL NEWCOMER IN WASHINGTON AND TO POLITICS GENERALLY. DURING HIS SHORT TENURE AS A STATE LAWMAKER IN MONTANA, HE DEVELOPED A REPUTATION AS A “MODERATE” ON SOME ISSUES.

    ODDLY ENOUGH, AS A POLITICAL NEWCOMER, ZINKE HAS AN EXTENSIVE VOCABULARY OF THE LIBERAL POLITICO ESTABLISHMENTS KEY BUZZ WORDS.

    ZINKI’S TOP PRIORITIES WOULD BE TO GIVE LOCAL LAND MANAGERS AND RANGERS MORE FLEXIBILITY IN LAND MANAGEMENT DECISIONS

    REALLY, START COOLING OFF TENSION OVER LAND USE

    AFTER ABOUT FOUR HOURS OF QUESTIONING  AND COMMENTS  DURING . REP. RYAN ZINKE CONFIRMATION HEARING BEFORE THE SENATE ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES COMMITTEE TUESDAY

    IT’S ALREADY CLEAR THERE COULD BE SOME FRICTION BETWEEN AN INTERIOR SECRETARY ZINKE AND SOME REPUBLICANS IN CONGRESS ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO SPENDING.

    AND REALLY, ZINKE  PROMISES TO BRING A TEDDY ROOSEVELT-STYLE APPROACH TO MANAGING FEDERAL PUBLIC LANDS?

    ZINKE  WENT ON TO SAY THAT HE THOUGHT THE COUNTRY HAS BENEFITED GREATLY FROM A LOT OF NATIONAL MONUMENT DESIGNATIONS, INCLUDING IN HIS HOME STATE OF MONTANA.

    ZINKE HINTED AT THE HEARING THAT ONE PRIORITY IN AN EXPECTED TRUMP-BACKED INFRASTRUCTURE BILL WILL BE TO ADDRESS A $12 BILLION BACKLOG IN MAINTENANCE AT NATIONAL PARKS.

    ZINKE HINTED? THAT  $12,000,000,000.00 BILLION DOLLAR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS) BACKLOG FOR MAINTENANCE WOULD BE  A PRIORITY FOR PRESIDENT TRUMP?

    PRESIDENT TRUMP WOULD HAVE A RED FLAG PRIORITY ON ANYTHING WITH  $12,000,000,000.00 BILLION DOLLAR AMOUNT ATTACHED TO IT.

    $12,000,000,000.00 BILLION DOLLARS IS THE LOW ESTIMATE FOR BUILDING THE WALL.

    MY CONSIDERED OPINION IS THAT RYAN ZINKE WOULD SUCK AS THE SECRETARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.

    WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, NOT ONLY  DO I  QUESTION, I STRENOUSLY OBJECT TO PRESIDENT TRUMP’S PICK REP. RYAN ZINKE, R-MONT TO HEAD THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR (DOI)

    ———————————————————————————–

    This is the hierarchy of power that  President Trump would be giving to Rep. Ryan Zinke, R-Mont. by appointment.

     A MAN WHO’S  IDEA OF HIS DUTY AS THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR SECRETARY IS TO MAKE SURE THAT WE HAVE A BROAD CONSENSUS ON WHAT WE’RE DOING

      The Department of the Interior Organizational Chart

    This is the classification of things according to relative importance or inclusiveness.

    Interior Organizational Chart

    Interior Organization Chart

    Trump Pick To Head Interior Department Says Climate Change Is Not …

    www.npr.org/…/trumppick-to-head-interior-department-says-climate-change-is-not-a…

    Jan 17, 2017 – Why would President-elect Donald Trump’s pick to head the U.S. Department of Interior, Rep. Ryan Zinke, R-Mont

    LOL  RYAN ZINKE,  SAYS “WE ALL LOVE OUR PUBLIC LANDS, AND THE DUTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AS A SECRETARY IS TO MAKE SURE THAT WE HAVE A BROAD CONSENSUS ON WHAT WE’RE DOING..

    Indeed, I would be speechless, if I did not have this website

    JUST SAYING. JUST ASKING? WHO IS THIS GUY?

     I’VE NEVER HEARD OF RYAN ZINKE. PERIOD WHO VETTED HIM?

    THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR (DOI) IS A MESS, AND ITS AGENCIES ARE A MESS, LIKE THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS) AND THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT (BLM) IS A BLOODY MESS,  THE DOI HAS MORE THAN CONTROL OF PUBLIC LAND, WITH A COMBINED CONTROL OF HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF ACRES OF PUBLIC LANDS, MOSTLY IN THE WEST.

    AS PRESIDENT TRUMP WOULD SAY “WHAT A MESS”.

    THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR (DOI) IS A MESS

    During the Obama administration, fights over control of federal land boiled over into armed standoffs led by rancher Cliven Bundy and his sons in Nevada and Oregon.

    And, During the Obama administration, fights over control of federal land boiled over again on January 2, 2016, armed militants seized the headquarters of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Harney County Oregon

    On January 26, 2016 Robert “LaVoy” Finicum,  was shot three times in the back by two OSP officers.

    ——————————————————————————————–

    IT’S ALREADY CLEAR THERE COULD BE SOME FRICTION BETWEEN AN INTERIOR SECRETARY ZINKE AND some Republicans in Congress especially when it comes to spending.

    Certainly, President Trump is aware of the abuse of power by Obama’s  appointed interior secretary of Department of the Interior (DOI)

    The abuse of power by the DOI has been historically documented, and was crystal clear to America’s taxpaying citizens and voters long before  Trump formally announced his candidacy on June 16, 2015.

    HISTORICALLY DOCUMENTED THE  DOI ABUSE OF POWER, UNDER THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT  (BLM) ” THE SAGEBRUSH REBELLION”  THAT STARTED IN 1970 AND THE BLM STANDOFF ARMED WITH THE BUNDY’S

    2014, ‘IF THINGS DON’T CHANGE, IT’S NOT LONG BEFORE SHOTS WILL BE FIRED,’ LYMAN SAID, JOINING OTHER CONSERVATIVE LAWMAKERS SUCH AS CHAFFETZ IN WARNING OF VIOLENCE

    IF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DIDN’T REIN IN THE BLM.

    AND, THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DID NOT REIN IN THE BLM.

    On January 26, 2016 Robert “LaVoy” Finicum,  was shot three times in the back by two OSP officers.

    Behind My Back | Shooting him three times in the back

    www.behindmyback.org/2016/03/09/4775/

    Mar 9, 2016 – Shooting him three times in the back. Shooting death of LaVoy Finicum justified, necessary, prosecutor says shows that the three fatal shots …

    ———————————————————————

    SO, Why did President Trump pick Rep. Ryan Zinke, R-Mont to  head the U.S. Department of Interior? to clean up the huge mess?

    ———————————————————————————-

    MAY 4, 2014 The Department of the Interior(DOI)  

    Behind My Back | Dept. of Interior Deterioration

    www.behindmyback.org/2014/05/04/dept-of-interiordeterioration/

    MAY 4, 2014“We the people” don’t have to look very far down the US. Government chain of command to pin point the cause of THE DETERIORATION of the … DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    —————————————————————————–

    HISTORICALLY DOCUMENTED THE  DOI ABUSE OF POWER, UNDER THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT  (BLM) ” THE SAGEBRUSH REBELLION”  THAT STARTED IN 1970

    PATRIOTIC AMERICAN CITIZENS CALL THEM “LAND GRABS”

    THE SAGEBRUSH REBELLION was a movement during the 1970s and 1980s that sought major changes to federal land control, use and disposal policy in the American West where, in 13 western states, federal land holdings include between 20% and 85% of a state’s area.

    YEP, PATRIOTIC AMERICAN CITIZENS CALL THEM, DOI BLM “LAND GRABS” IT GOT SO WILD IT WAS NAMED THE WILD OLYMPIC SCAM, BY HOOK OR BY CROOKS OR BY OBAMA’S EXECUTIVE ORDERS

    Obama signs executive order, bypasses Congress, and …

    https://investmentwatchblog.com/obamasignsexecutiveorderbypasses-…

    1 day ago – OBAMA SIGNS EXECUTIVE ORDER, BYPASSES CONGRESS, AND LEGALIZES ALL BLM LAND GRABS. … ORDER, BYPASS CONGRESS, AND DO A MASSIVE BLM LAND GRAB. … http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/constitution/item/22499-behind- …

    ———————————————————————————

    A sequel to a 1970s movement that sought a state takeover ( LAND GRABS) of federal public lands.

    Behind My Back | The Sagebrush Rebellion

    www.behindmyback.org/2014/04/14/the-sagebrushrebellion/

    Apr 14, 2014 – This 20th-century conflict, known as the Sagebrush Rebellion, pits ranchers, loggers, miners and others against Washington bureaucrats in a …

    ——————————————————————————————

    THE BLM LAND GRAB

    In May 2014, in Texas, militias and their allies came to protest a BLM survey of more than 90,000 acres along the Red River, fearing the federal government was planning a land grab.”

    ‘If things don’t change, it’s not long before shots will be fired,’ Lyman said, joining other conservative lawmakers such as Chaffetz in warning of violence if the federal government didn’t rein in the BLM.

    ‘We can avoid it. But it’s not going to be by the people changing their attitudes and accepting more intrusion into their lives. IT’S GOING TO BE BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ACKNOWLEDGING PEOPLE’S FREEDOM.’‘It is impossible to overstate the importance of the victory won in the desert today, “The feds were routed—routed. There is no word that applies. Courage is contagious, defiance is contagious, victory is contagious. Yet the war is not over.’”

    JAN 30, 2017 WHILE THE STANDOFF AT THE BUNDY RANCH IN CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, HAS FADED AND THE SHOOTING DEATH OF LAVOY FINICUM HAS FADED FROM THE  LIBERAL  PUBLIC NEWS  MEDIA HEADLINES.

    DONALD J. TRUMP IS THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    Update  Jan 29, 2017 Robert “LaVoy” Finicum

    (GO TO THE ARTICLE LINK HERE)

    http://redoubtnews.com/2017/01/29/meeting-never-happened-john-day/

    Their intent is to meet President Donald Trump and present him with a letter requesting the pardon of local ranchers, Dwight and Steven Hammond.

    ———————————————————————————-

    BLM Bureau of Land Mismanagement

    Posted on February 29, 2016 9:33 am by Pearl Rains Hewett Comment

    February 26, 2016 Toni Webb’s  story is here… OREGON CANDIDATE EXPOSES SOCIAL, ECONOMIC CATASTROPHE CAUSED BY FEDERAL CONTROL IN JOSEPHINE COUNTY

    Liz and I both saw this … As the history of our three counties in three different states. Washington State, Oregon and Calif. Liz Bowen is from Siskiyou County, Calif. Pie N Politics Pearl Rains Hewett is from Clallam County WA

    ——————————————————————

    Jan 30, 2017 Updated to reflect…

    DONALD J. TRUMP IS THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    As, President of the United States, Trump shall seriously affect the transfer of ownership and return control of public lands back to western states, like Oregon, as critical to our survival.

    ——————————————————————————

    Trump Jr Human Toll Issues – WA DC Edicts

    Posted on June 11, 2016 9:18 am by Pearl Rains Hewett Comment

    Donald Trump Jr has been informed of the issues.

    Toni Webb’s  issues are…  THE SOCIAL, ECONOMIC CATASTROPHE CAUSED BY FEDERAL CONTROL IN JOSEPHINE COUNTY OREGON

    ————————————————————

    February 13, 2016

    Toni Webb meets with Donald Trump Jr to discuss Timber Issues and Land Ownership.

    The bottom line from Toni…

    Jan 30, 2017 Updated to reflect…

    Donald Trump Jr was informed of the issues.

    ————————————————————————

    DONALD J. TRUMP IS THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    I have no doubt President Donald Trump will  transfer our lands from federal mismanagement. He has assured us, he will prevent further loss and reverse the losses that have plunged our county into poverty..

    INDEED,  PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SHALL MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN, AND HELP US HELP OURSELVES.

    ———————————————————————————

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/01/17/510335071/trump-pick-to-head-interior-department-says-climate-change-is-not-a-hoax

    The bottom line

    MY CONSIDERED OPINION IS THAT RYAN ZINKE WOULD “SUCK” AS THE SECRETARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.

    WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, NOT ONLY  DO I  QUESTION, I STRENUOUSLY OBJECT TO PRESIDENT TRUMP’S PICK REP. RYAN ZINKE, R-MONT TO HEAD THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR (DOI) TO CLEAN UP THE HUGE (DOI) MESS


  • The NPS Wild Wilderness SCAM Continues..

    The THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS) WILD Wilderness SCAM Continues..

    INDEED, IN AUG, 2016 THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS)  IS CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF THE GROSS MISMANAGEMENT OF MORE THAN 84 MILLION ACRES OF PUBLIC LAND IN 412 AREAS

    THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS) IS $12,000,000,000.00  $12 BILLION DOLLARS BEHIND ON MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF AMERICAS NATIONAL PARKS

    Centennial Initiative 2016 – National Park Service

    https://www.nps.gov/nava/learn/…/centennial-initiative-2016.ht…

    NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN CELEBRATION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN 2016, … THINGS TO COME AS THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE PREPARES TO CELEBRATE 100 YEARS!

    —————————————————————

    THE WILD OLYMPIC CAMPAIGN SUPPORTS THE PROPOSED WILD OLYMPICS WILDERNESS AND WILD & SCENIC RIVERS ACT,

    WHICH WAS REINTRODUCED LAST YEAR BY U.S. SEN. PATTY MURRAY, D-SEATTLE, AND U.S. REP. DEREK KILMER, D-GIG HARBOR.

     SO… THE WILD OLYMPICS SCAM CONTINUES IN 2016

    NINTY FIVE PERCENT 95% OF THE MILLION ACRES OF THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK IS ALREADY WILD. period

    AND, NINTY FIVE PERCENT 95% OF THE MILLION ACRES OF THE OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK IS NOT MAINTAINED OR REPAIRED. period

    SO…  the National Park Service (NPS) has mismanaged 84 million acres of public parks for 100 years, to the tune of $12,000,000,000.00  $12 BILLION DOLLARS AND,“BECAUSE THAT MONEY DOESN’T EXIST IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE.”.

    THINGS TO COME AS THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE PREPARES TO CELEBRATE 100 YEARS?

     U.S. SEN. PATTY MURRAY, D-SEATTLE, AND U.S. REP. DEREK KILMER, D-GIG HARBOR ARE CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF A FAILED NPS BY REINTRODUCING A  BILL THAT WOULD PERMANENTLY TAKE  AND MAKE  MORE THAN 126,000 ACRES OF NEW MISMANAGED WILDERNESS AREAS ON JUST THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA.

    U.S. SEN. PATTY MURRAY, D-SEATTLE IS UP FOR RE-ELECTION

    ——————————————

    NPR: National parks have a long to-do list but can’t cover the repair costs

    www.npr.org/…/nationalparks-have-a-long-to-do-list-but-cant-cover-the-repair-cos…

    NPR MAR 8, 2016 – THERE IS A NEARLY $12 BILLION MAINTENANCE BACKLOG OF WORK THAT NEEDS … SAYS, “BECAUSE THAT MONEY DOESN’T EXIST IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE.”.

    —————————————————————————-

    HOW WILD IS THE WILD WILDERNESS ACT?

    THERE ARE OVER 700 FEDERALLY DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS IN FORTY-FOUR STATES, COVERING MORE THAN 107 MILLION ACRES OF LAND, OR AROUND 5% OF THE UNITED STATES LAND BASE.

     AND THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS) IS  RESPONSIBLE FOR THE GROSS MISMANAGEMENT AND NEGLECT OF  MORE THAN 84 MILLION ACRES OF THAT 107 MILLION ACRES OF PUBLIC LAND IN 412  OF OVER 700 AREAS IN FORTY-FOUR STATES.

    ————————————————————-

    Centennial Initiative 2016 – National Park Service

    https://www.nps.gov/nava/learn/…/centennial-initiative-2016.ht…

    NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN CELEBRATION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN 2016, … THINGS TO COME AS THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE PREPARES TO CELEBRATE 100 YEARS!

    ————————————————————————————-

    Using statistics from, MAR 15, 2012

    The Wilderness Act is widely known as one of the nation’s preeminent

    preservation statutes.

    FEDERALLY DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS ARE FOUND WITHIN EACH MAJOR CATEGORY OF THE FEDERAL PUBLIC LANDs…….

    1. NATIONAL FORESTS
    2. NATIONAL PARKS
    3. WILDLIFE REFUGES
    4. PUBLIC LANDS MANAGED BY THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT (BLM)

    THERE ARE OVER 700 FEDERALLY DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS IN FORTY-FOUR STATES, COVERING MORE THAN 107 MILLION ACRES OF LAND, OR AROUND 5% OF THE UNITED STATES LAND BASE.11

    THE VAST MAJORITY OF WILDERNESS IN THE LOWER FORTY-EIGHT STATES—ABOUT 75%—IS LOCATED  WITHIN ONLY FIVE ECOREGIONS: one desert ecoregion—the Mojave Desert of

    California—and four high elevation ecoregions—the southern and middle

    Rocky Mountains, the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the Cascade Mountains of the Pacific Northwest.

    Read more at https://law.lclark.edu/live/files/11181-421zellmerpdf Lewis & Clark Law School

     —————————————————————————————–

    July 24, 2016 JUST ASKING?

    WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE REST OF THE GROSSLY MISMANAGED FEDERAL PUBLIC LAND?

    ————————————————————————-

    Wild Olympics | Citizen Review Online

    citizenreviewonline.org/category/wildolympics/

    Olympic Peninsula, WA – The Wild Olympics debate has continued locally. ….. CONSPIRACY EXPOSED Oct. 8, 1992 The notarized document was written on …

    Wild Olympics – Oct. 8, 1992 to Oct. 29, 2012

    Commentary by Pearl Rains-Hewett

    Posted 10/29/2012

    CONSPIRACY EXPOSED Oct. 8, 1992 The notarized document  was written on Oct. 8, 1992 by George C. Rains Sr. when he was 77 years old.

    OVER 20 YEARS AGO George C. Rains Sr. WROTE

    How can a Federal Government of ours pay money for things like this when our government is many trillions of dollars in debt?

    This conspiracy will never end unless you people, property owners and tax payers start fighting back to stop the conspiracy and the taking of all our property on the Olympic Peninsula.

     The Olympic National Park has doubled in size to over one million acres or more.

     Most people have no knowledge of these vast encroachments to take our property and property rights on the Olympic Peninsula, and it is time that the truth be known. Land and Power Grab

     The National Park Service has no respect for private property ownership and rights.

     Attempts are being made to grab land corridors on each side of the major rivers on the Olympic Peninsula. If they succeed here attempts will be made to grab land corridors on smaller streams on the Olympic Peninsula.

     Pearl Rains Hewett

    Read on if you are concerned Continue reading

    —————————————————————————————–

    THE WILD OLYMPICS PLAN, WILDERNESS, WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS IS MORE THAN A SCAM

    UNDER THE WILDERNESS ACT OF 1964,

    THE WILD OLYMPICS PLAN, WILDERNESS, WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS, is not a giving of access of public land to THE AMERICAN PEOPLE.

    indeed,  IT IS A TAKING OF PUBLIC LAND ACCESS, it is a taking of the full use and enjoyment to over 300 million people

    THE WILD OLYMPICS PLAN  is a dishonest scheme; “Lack of transparency is a huge political advantage”

     And basically, call it the ignorance, of American citizens or whatever,

    But basically, the ignorance, of American citizens, is really, really critical for  THE WILD OLYMPICS PLAN, WILDERNESS, WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS to pass.”

    THE WILD OLYMPICS PLAN  is more than a fraud, a thing intended to deceive others, typically by unjustifiably claiming or being credited with accomplishments or qualities.

    THE WILD OLYMPICS PLAN  is more than a swindle, using deception to deprive (someone) of money or possessions..

    The Wild Olympics Scam

    www.wildolympicsscam.com/

    stop the wild olympics, agenda 21, land grabs; will devastate rural communities.

     ——————————————————————————-

    July 18, 2016

    HOW WILD IS THIS LIBERAL NEWS REPORTING?

    —————————————————————

     07.18.16

    Map released in support of Wild Olympics campaign; two outdoor retailers touting Peninsula’s nature, recreation

    Two popular outdoor clothing retailers are encouraging their customers to visit the Olympic Peninsula and support the Wild Olympics campaign.

    REI and Patagonia are promoting the Wild Olympics campaign at REI Seattle and online, encouraging customers to experience the diverse nature and outdoor recreation available on the North Olympic Peninsula.

    THE CAMPAIGN SUPPORTS THE PROPOSED WILD OLYMPICS WILDERNESS AND WILD & SCENIC RIVERS ACT, WHICH WAS REINTRODUCED LAST YEAR BY U.S. SEN. PATTY MURRAY, D-SEATTLE, AND U.S. REP. DEREK KILMER, D-GIG HARBOR.

    The bill would permanently protect more than 126,000 acres of new wilderness areas in Olympic National Forest and 19 Olympic Peninsula rivers and their tributaries as Wild and Scenic Rivers — the first ever on the Peninsula.

    Initiative’s shaping

    The effort comes out of a process involving local communities, businesses and economic leaders of the Olympic Peninsula who helped shape the initiative, organizers said.

    “For those of us that live on the Peninsula, we know about the natural beauty,” said state Rep. Steve THARINGER, A SEQUIM DEMOCRAT who represents the 24th Legislative District. “That’s the advantage of living here.

    “You can choose to walk on the spit or go up in the hills and walk in the Olympics. There’s a lot of folks that don’t know the variety we have here.”

    The North Olympic Timber Action Committee has been looking for a compromise to the legislation for the past several years that would help support the timber industry, said Carol Johnson, executive director.

    NOTAC substantially agrees with the concept of the proposal but wants to remove areas that are routinely logged, she said.

    “What we said is, make some adjustments to the proposal and bring into the plan a timber base that is routinely roaded,” she said.

    “Make that part of the plan so we can have a sustainable harvest level in perpetuity and have our support.”

    Connie Gallant, chair of the Wild Olympics, called the partnership with REI and Patagonia exciting.

    “It is our hope that legislation happens in the near future because it will benefit our economy and environment a great deal,” she said.

    Outdoor recreation groups REI and Patagonia unveiled a new “Destination Wild Olympics” map, highlighting some recreation places in the Wild Olympics proposal.

    To view the map, see http://tinyurl.com/PDN-wildolympicsmap.

    The map highlights some spots on the North Peninsula that locals will know well, including the Dungeness River, Dungeness Spit, Sol Duc River, Sol Duc Falls Trail and local rivers.

    THARINGER SAID one of the goals is to get more people outside the area enjoying the nature that is offered on the Peninsula.

    “It’s a way to highlight the beauty and the wilderness in the park,” he said.

    “When folks are searching on the internet for things to do outside, you’ll never know what will trigger their interest.”

    Port Angeles City Councilwoman SISSI BRUCH SAID she supports the new initiative.

    “The idea of encouraging people who love the outdoors to come to our pristine wilderness areas while supporting their preservation has great synergy,” she said.

    “This, in concert with Port Angeles’ designation as the second-best outdoor town, validates Port Angeles’ status as a world-class outdoor recreation destination and speaks highly of our need to protect this unique and pristine environment.”

    The campaign comes from lawmakers and the outdoor clothing companies’ desires to protect and promote the outdoors, Tharinger said.

    ‘Promoting the outdoors’

    “I served on a GOVERNOR’S TASK FORCE with people from REI, and they are interested in promoting the outdoors,” he said.

    “I think it’s a synergy between PATAGONIA, REI AND THE FOLKS INTERESTED IN GETTING THE LEGISLATION PASSED THROUGH CONGRESS.”

    THARINGER SAID there is concern about the designations regarding logging but that he doesn’t see an impact to the commercial logging industry.

    “Making these designations is not going to impact the timber supply, but it does bolster the tourist industry,” he said.

    Free hard copies of the map will also be available at REI retail outlets in the Puget Sound area.
    By:  Jesse Major
    Source: Peninsula Daily News

    The bottom line….

    Basically, the ignorance, of American citizens, is really, really critical for  THE WILD OLYMPICS PLAN, WILDERNESS, WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS to pass.


  • Wilding the West Murrays Choice Our Sacrifice

    Wilding the West Murray’s Choice Our Sacrifice

    SENATOR MURRAY HAS MADE HER CHOICE, INTRODUCING  SENATE BILLS  FOR WILDERNESS AND WILDING, SACRIFICING THE USE OF OUR PUBLIC NATIONAL PARKS, PRIVATE LANDS  AND RIVERS.  PLACING RESTRICTIONS ON PUBLIC AND PRIVATE RESOURCES OF, AND IN WASHINGTON, IDAHO, CALIFORNIA, AND OREGON STATE

    Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests and Mining Legislative Hearing

    Please click on and read the two links below.

    Someone else’s choice = your sacrifice

    There are some words and terms with a local parallel which you will quickly recognize like: STAKEHOLDERS, SUSTAINABILITY, UNSUSTAINABLE, COLLABORATE ,WATER UNCERTAINTY, JOBS, GREEN ECONOMY, BIODIVERSITY, ACCOUNTABILITY, TRANSPARENCY, RESTORATION, WATER QUALITY, POLLUTION,

    STATUS QUO (which is probably code for locals trying to maintain their legal, economic, citizenship and constitutional rights)

     INEQUALITY, EQUALITY, INDIGENOUS, LOCAL, ORGANIC, ORGANIC AGRICULTURE, BIODIVERSITY, NATURAL, SUSTAINABLE GROWTH, CLIMATE CHANGE, ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT, MONITORING, FAIRNESS, JUSTICE, DISTRIBUTIONAL JUSTICE, GOVERNANCE (as opposed to representative government) and on and on. We have been thoroughly sound-bite-bitten by those same UN mantra bumper sticker slogans and terms around here since the beginning of the local collaborator’s stakeholder “settlement” process. It all seems to be frighteningly in sync as well with what is referred to as the UN’s Millennium Declaration and Millennium Development Goals.

    ———————————————————————
    “Well, if I wanted all the people out of Northern California, what would I do?”

    I’d lock up all the natural resources.  I would remove all the infrastructure… like the DAMS. After some more time went by… I’d have the National Forest in a quasi wilderness area, I’d have the loggers gone…Get rid of the pesky diggers..the mining community. I’d go after the agriculture community…attempt to eliminate them.  I’d go up stream…get rid of the  dams, remove the water inventory and electrical generation for 70,000 homes.

    ——————————————————————-

     Well, if Senator Murray wanted all the people out of the Olympic Peninsula, what would she do?

    Murray introduced the Senate Bill 1510; To designate and expand wilderness areas in OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST IN THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, AND TO DESIGNATE CERTAIN RIVERS IN OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST AND OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK AS WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

    ——————————————————————————————-

    Senator Murray wants all the people off of the Olympic Peninsula

    WELL, IF I WANTED SENATOR MURRAY OUT OF THE U.S. WILDING WILDERNESS BUSINESS, WHAT WOULD I DO?

    —————————————————————————–

    Email my Comment to: Lisa Murkowski
    Chairman of Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Office and Senate Appropriations

    Chairman – U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural …

    www.energy.senate.gov › Home › About United States Senate

    Lisa Murkowski is Alaska’s senior representative in the U.S. Senate and the chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and Senate Appropriations … To visit Chairman Murkowski’s person office website, click here.

    ————————————————-

    My email to Senator Lisa Murkowski
    United States Senator, Alaska

    Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests and Mining Legislative Hearing

    Indeed, I do oppose any and all additional Wild, Wilderness, LAND and river designations in the U.S.A.

    SENATOR MURRAY’S BILLS ARE FOR WILDING  AND SACRIFICING OUR USE OF PUBLIC  LANDS AND RIVERS IN WASHINGTON, IDAHO, CALIFORNIA, AND OREGON STATE.

    THE NPS CARETAKERS HAVE A $12 BILLION DOLLAR BACK LOG OF MAINTENANCE.

    BY DEFINITION THE NPS IS NOT AND HAS NOT BEEN FULFILLING IT’S OBLIGATION OR RESPONSIBILITY AS CARETAKER TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE  FOR KEEPING THE NATION’S NATIONAL PARKS  IN GOOD REPAIR.

    BY DEFINITION,  THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE HAS BECOME A GATEKEEPER. THAT CONTROLS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE ACCESS TO OUR PUBLIC LAND AND RESOURCES.

    Pearl Rains Hewett

    Clallam County WA

    ————————————————————————

    Contact Form

    Thank you very much for contacting my office. I have received your message and your views are important to me. Please be on the lookout for a response from me or my staff.

    In the meantime, please feel free to call my Washington, DC office at (202) 224-6665, connect with me on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter for news and updates.

    Sincerely,

    Lisa Murkowski
    United States Senator, Alaska

    ———————————————————————-

    304 Dirksen Senate Building
    Washington, DC 20510
    Phone: (202) 224-4971
    Fax: (202) 224-6163

    ——————————————————————————

    AND MURRAY’S FOR OTHER PURPOSES? ALASKA?, ARIZONA?, UTAH?

    Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests and Mining Legislative Hearing

    366 Dirksen Senate Office Building 02:30 PM

    The Energy and Natural Resources’ Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests and Mining will hold a hearing on Thursday, April 21 at 2:30 p.m. in Room 366 Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington, DC.

     The purpose of the hearing is to receive testimony on the following bills:

    1. 1510 (Murray), to designate and expand wilderness areas in Olympic National Forest in the State of WASHINGTON, and to designate certain rivers in Olympic National Forest and Olympic National Park as wild and scenic rivers, and for other purposes.

       S. 1167 (Crapo), to modify the boundaries of the Pole Creek Wilderness, the Owyhee River Wilderness, and the North Fork Owyhee Wilderness and to authorize the continued use of motorized vehicles for livestock monitoring, herding, and grazing in certain wilderness areas in the State of IDAHO.

       S. 1423 (Boxer), to designate certain Federal lands in CALIFORNIA as wilderness, and for other purposes.

    • S. 1699 (Wyden), to designate certain land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service in the State of OREGON as wilderness and national recreation areas and to make additional wild and scenic river designations in the State of Oregon, and for other purposes.
    • S. 1777 (Risch), to amend the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to maintain or replace certain facilities and structures for commercial recreation services at Smith Gulch in IDAHO, and for other purposes.
    • S. 2018 (Murkowski), to convey, without consideration, the reversionary interests of the United States in and to certain non-Federal land in Glennallen, ALASKA.
    • S. 2223 (Thune), to transfer administrative jurisdiction over certain Bureau of Land Management land from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs for inclusion in the BLACK HILLS National Cemetery, and for other purposes.
    • S. 2379 (Flake), to provide for the unencumbering of title to non-Federal land owned by the city of Tucson, ARIZONA, for purposes of economic development by conveyance of the Federal reversionary interest to the City.
    • S. 2383 (Hatch), To withdraw certain Bureau of Land Management land in the State of UTAH from all forms of public appropriation, to provide for the shared management of the withdrawn land by the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of the Air Force to facilitate enhanced weapons testing and pilot training, enhance public safety, and provide for continued public access to the withdrawn land, to provide for the exchange of certain Federal land and State land, and for other purposes.

    The hearing will be webcast live on the committee’s website, and an archived video will be available shortly after the hearing is complete. Witness testimony will be available on the website at the start of the hearing.

    ———————————————————————————–

    full unedited text

    Letter to KBC News by Mark Johnson, 4/12/16

    “Well, if I wanted all the people out of Northern California, what would I do?”
    I’d lock up all the natural resources.  I would remove all the infrastructure… like the Klamath dams.

    I would put the people on printed money heroin…and they would get addicted to transfer payments and free government services.

    After some more time went by… I’d have the Klamath National Forest in a quasi wilderness area, I’d have the loggers gone…Get rid of the pesky diggers..the mining community. I’d go after the agriculture community…attempt to eliminate them.  I’d go up stream…get rid of the 4 dams, remove the water inventory and electrical generation for 70,000 homes.  The warm nutrient rich waters from above the dams would not be cleaned by the dreaded green algae.  The nutrient rich without the dams…the water would be warmer down stream, the O2 level less…and the fish kill cycles greater, and deeper.

    Then I’d go to the Klamath Basin…and slowly, surely…eliminate the federal water projects, the potato farmers, the alfalfa farmers,

    I’d make it all a big wetlands area like before the white man.

    Then as a government… I’d be broke…my govt printed money would have no purchasing power. My debt would be so great that I would have to print money to pay the debt which equals inflation.

    The people I tricked with BIA and O and C transfer payments would have no means of support, no raw materials….and no land for wealth creation.

    Those rural people would have to migrate to the cities, or they would have to die early…. like the Native American does on the reservation system.

    U.S. National Debt Clock : Real Time

    It’s not really politics so much as it is Math.

    Take out enough infrastructure…get a welfare govt like the one we have in the US now……. then you can share with Venzuela:

    Venezuela Declares Every Friday A Holiday To Conserve Electricity | Zero Hedge

    It can happen here.   It is happening here.
    Mark Johnson

    ———————————————————————

    full unedited text

    Someone else’s choice = your sacrifice
    Posted on the www.klamathbasincrisis.org / KBC News Discussion Forum by Finnious T Fogbottom Tue April 12, 2016
    Over the past 25 years over 800 dams of various sizes have been destroyed in our nation alone. That is a bit scary since one of the big differences between first and third world countries is found in the existence or absence of fully functioning dams. The politically correct World Bank had been busily financing the construction of Third World dams by the way, until there arose too much pressure from their otherwise Green allies. Truly when the ethically protected usage, flow and storage of water is harnessed by and for humankind freedom can have a tendency to abound, when combined with free markets that is. With the availability of resources as such there also comes great opportunity for individual advancement in terms of education, employment, wealth, strength, vitality, health and the pursuit of happiness. That also leads directly to the enhancement of the general fitness, financial soundness, global relevance, unity, security and wellbeing of a nation, from the bottom up.

    On the other hand if a certain sort would like to subversively take control of a nation an obvious place to begin would be to gain despotic, destructive and disruptive control over its waters. Because with that also comes authority over many other things that we can’t live without like food, wealth, jobs, electricity etc. It hasn’t gone without notice that over recent decades there have been many an alarming attempt and success in the movement to drain our citizenry and nation of its wealth, rights, freedom, future, confidence, trust of government, unadulterated history and might. Simultaneously a form of top down centralized constituency free governance has been worming its way into the political landscape of our nation and even the world.

    So, what if there really were dedicated and well funded operations in existence which work tirelessly to undermine capitalism, and with that reshape the balance of local, regional, national and global power? What if their preferred and nearly perfected disruptive mechanism is simply the oppressive manipulation of water, species, rights, equality issues, sea and land policy? What if all of this was falling into place through Marxist inspired radical political correctness and environmentalism, empowered by the tragic consensus, collaboration and support of a manipulated populace which has apocalyptically yet proudly exchanged the truth for a lie? Well, that just may be what is currently taking place near and far.

    Not too long before the seemingly treacherous and unsupported agreement to remove four Klamath River dams was signed (with blatant indifference to voter or congressional approval) it was more than a little disquieting to find out that Dan Keppen, (former head of the Klamath Water Users Association) had met with the Obama Whitehouse and United Nations associates in person to discuss water issues, water policy and resolution templates including the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement (KBRA) etc. That time line may be coincidental, still it is important to consider how many of the KBRA collaboration buzz words are found throughout a UN report titled MANAGING WATER UNDER UNCERTAINTY AND RISK. It is quite revealing to search out (control/F) certain words in that document. There are some words and terms with a local parallel which you will quickly recognize like: STAKEHOLDERS, SUSTAINABILITY, UNSUSTAINABLE, COLLABORATE ,WATER UNCERTAINTY, JOBS, GREEN ECONOMY, BIODIVERSITY, ACCOUNTABILITY, TRANSPARENCY, RESTORATION, WATER QUALITY, POLLUTION, STATUS QUO (which is probably code for locals trying to maintain their legal, economic, citizenship and constitutional rights) INEQUALITY, EQUALITY, INDIGENOUS, LOCAL, ORGANIC, ORGANIC AGRICULTURE, BIODIVERSITY, NATURAL, SUSTAINABLE GROWTH, CLIMATE CHANGE, ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT, MONITORING, FAIRNESS, JUSTICE, DISTRIBUTIONAL JUSTICE, GOVERNANCE (as opposed to representative government) and on and on. We have been thoroughly sound-bite-bitten by those same UN mantra bumper sticker slogans and terms around here since the beginning of the local collaborator’s stakeholder “settlement” process. It all seems to be frighteningly in sync as well with what is referred to as he UN’s Millennium Declaration and Millennium Development Goals.

    I was sad but not astonished as well to see in Keppen’s Herald and News article that he was also happy about the success enjoyed by Klamath Blue Zone programs and projects. Here too rises up the nagging fear that KBZone may be just one more local manifestation of a citizen’s Marxist Manifesto. It does make you wonder for sure when the recent H & N Blue Zone article spewed this: “A community effort …these measures may look like someone coming into town and arbitrarily telling people what they can and can’t do. But he said there comes a time when a community needs to consider how an individual’s decisions impact the entire group… Sometimes, as a society, we have to ask and answer some very hard questions about what is best for all of us…Similarly, he continued, when it comes to health, sometimes we’re going to have to make difficult choices and make individual sacrifices in favor of benefiting a larger population.” It sounds like they would also like to eventually make some UN similar choices for us: choices for our improved healthy happy alternative communal sustainable future. In the end it is all about others answering questions and making choices for us – for the greater good of the greater number of course!

    Sky Lakes Medical Center (for the greater good) is NOW telling us that it is not making Blue Zones like choices for us, yet visitors can no longer buy sugared anything on the hospital premises. It is so nice that we have so many caring people running around close to where we live making “good choices” for we dummies! We dummies who don’t know good from bad, right from wrong, evil from good and on and on. A few more Soviet style consensus councils and we just may be on our way to heaven on earth, and peace and unity without God. Until things literally and predictably go to Hell.

    So, it should go without saying that there is as usual just a whole lot at stake in the upcoming elections. Especially when one considers that no truly conservative politician could ever have anything to do with the Marxist inspired, anti-republic KBRA etc., Blue Zones or the whole mess of tax and spend Citizens for Great Sounding but Eventually Self-Destructive Stuff. At their core one must fully consider the probability that whether by naivety, greed, misdirection, foolishness or malice they share the some of the political leanings as found in the bulk of our nation’s enemies past and present. It is all a receipt for disaster.

    As we discover through inquiry and questions what the candidates are all about and where their roots are fastened, we will then have a good idea of where they are coming from and where they are trying to go, or take us. In the end don’t vote for anyone who will try to get you to agree to sacrifice what you can’t afford to lose to someone who hasn’t earned it, then take you somewhere you don’t want your family, your friends, yourself, community, city, county, state or country, or world to go, let alone become!

    Oh yes, where did that $48,000,000 is misappropriated BOR funds end up? Here’s to a certain sort of upcoming indictment.

    Finnious T. Fogbottom

    —————————————————————-

    Just saying..

    Senator Murray wants all the people off of the Olympic Peninsula

    WELL, IF I WANTED SENATOR MURRAY OUT OF THE U.S. WILDING WILDERNESS BUSINESS, WHAT WOULD I DO?

    —————————————————————————–

    Federally speaking

    EMAIL MY COMMENT TO: LISA MURKOWSKI
     CHAIRMAN OF SENATE ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES COMMITTEE OFFICE AND SENATE APPROPRIATIONS


  • NPS Director Testifies on ONP Access

    March 20, 2016 PDN Reports

    Olympic Hot Springs Road temporary bridge in works; no time set yet to begin construction

    03.16.2016 – The House Appropriations Interior Subcommittee holds a hearing to review the FY 2017 budget request for the National Park Service. NPS Director Jon Jarvis testifies.

    Kilmer represents the 6th Congressional District, which covers the Olympic and Kitsap peninsulas and most of Tacoma.

    U.S. Rep Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, questioned Jarvis about the status of the road in a House Appropriations Interior Subcommittee hearing on the National Park Service budget Wednesday.

    You can view it here.

     

    ——————————————————–

    How bad is it? February 16. 2016

    Click here to zoom...

    Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News
    Olympic National Park chief electrician Robert Perina crosses a temporary plank bridge over a side channel of the Elwha River as electrician apprentice Kevan Keegan looks on near the Elwha Campground in Olympic National Park, southwest of Port Angeles on Tuesday.

    ————————————————-

    March 2o, 2016

    Olympic Hot Springs Road temporary bridge in works; no time set yet to begin construction

    Click here to zoom...

    Rob Ollikainen/Peninsula Daily News
    This section of Olympic Hot Springs Road washed out in a November flood. National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis told U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer that a one-lane bridge would be installed over the washout area in six to eight weeks.

    PORT ANGELES — Funding has been requested and plans are under review for a temporary one-lane bridge over a 60-foot washout near the Elwha Campground on Olympic Hot Springs Road.

    Once plans are approved by such agencies as the Army Corps of Engineers, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Fish and Wildlife, construction would take from six to eight weeks, said Barb Maynes, Olympic National Park spokeswoman.

    She didn’t know when plans would be approved or when construction would begin.

    The washout has blocked access to the Elwha River Valley west of Port Angeles since November. Olympic Hot Springs Road is closed to vehicles at the Madison Falls trailhead, about a mile north of the washout itself.

    Temporary bridge

    The temporary bridge would be in place for as long as five years before a more permanent structure is built.

    The Elwha Campground, which was severely damaged in fall and winter floods, isn’t expected to be reopened this year, Maynes said.

    The National Park Service has requested emergency funds from the Federal Highway Administration to install a temporary bridge over the washout, National Park Service Director John Jarvis said last week.

    U.S. Rep Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, questioned Jarvis about the status of the road in a House Appropriations Interior Subcommittee hearing on the National Park Service budget Wednesday.

    “We’ve got a lot of private landowners and park users and research scientists and park service staff who are very heavily impacted by the loss of this single access point,” Kilmer said.

    “So I was hoping you could just discuss what the service is doing to expedite repairs to the road and ensure that access is restored as quickly as possible.”

    Said Jarvis: “We expect that to take about six weeks, six to eight weeks, to get that installed.

    “And that will serve — not great — but it will serve access to the landowners that are up that road and our own administrative access. We’ve got park housing, we have a maintenance facility up there and the public access as well.”

    Kilmer represents the 6th Congressional District, which covers the Olympic and Kitsap peninsulas and most of Tacoma.

    Maynes confirmed that a FEW  private landowners have land past the park entrance.

    Kilmer said. “We’ve got a LOT OF  private landowners and park users and research scientists and park service staff who are very heavily impacted by the loss of this single access point” “So I was hoping you could just discuss what the service is doing to expedite repairs to the road and ensure that access is restored as quickly as possible.”
    National Park Service Director John Jarvis said
    “And that will serve — not great — but it will serve access TO THE LANDOWNERS that are up that road and our own administrative access. We’ve got park housing, we have a maintenance facility up there and the public access as well.”
    “These visits do more than provide inspirational, educational and recreational opportunities; in 2014, they drove over $30 billion in economic impact, supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs in communities around the country,” he said.
    ———————————————————
    Indeed, there is always the “Rest of the Story”
    Achieving accountability from the U.S. Government?
    Referring to the removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams, a project that began in 2011.

    Olympic National Park mea culpa: ‘Inholder’ blocked from …

    www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/…/30628999…
    Peninsula Daily News

    Jun 28, 2011 – Olympic National Park mea culpa: ‘Inholder’ blocked from family property. Previous Photo. Next Photo …. From the PDN: See more special …

    Click here to zoom...

    Pearl Rains Hewett stands at a blockade on Olympic Hot Springs Road in Olympic National Park on Monday. — Photo by Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News June 28. 2011

    —————————————————–

    And, “The Rest of the Rest of the Story”

    Requesting Help from the my U.S. elected representatives?

    U.S. Rep Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, represents the 6th Congressional District, which covers the Olympic and Kitsap peninsulas and most of Tacoma.

    Behind My Back | Go Find Your Park? Come Fix My Road?

    www.behindmyback.org/2016/01/…/go-find-your-park-comefixmyro

    Jan 28, 2016 – DEC 12, 2015 COME FIX MY ROAD REQUEST TO MY WA DC ELECTED … the full text of this 1430 word comment is on behindmyback.org.

    ——————————————————————–

    On Feb 19, 2016  Rep. Kilmer held a Clallam County Town Hall in Sequim WA.

    I gave a print out of my Feb 18, 2016 posting to Judith Morris.

    Behind My Back | PDN What’s Wrong With These Pictures?

    www.behindmyback.org/…/pdn-feb-17-2016-whats-wrong-with-these-pi…

    Feb 18, 2016 – “Bridging water troubles” on the Olympic Hot Springs Road. … JAN 19, 2016 STILL, NO RESPONSE TO COME FIX MY ROAD FROM OLYMPIC …

    I sat down to wait for the meeting to start. I showed people the two pictures on the front page of the PDN, with the people around me. I had an real issue with Rep. Kilmer priorities, ignoring the emergency road repair for Olympic National Park tourism and instead promoting an art thing at Fort Warden?

    After a few minutes Judith called me into a side room. Rep. Kilmer and I had a 15 minute conversation on my economic concerns for our community  and his failure to prioritize  and act on the emergency flooding disaster.

    Feb 19, 2016  I did remind Rep. Kilmer, of what an  economic driver tourism is to our community.

    ————————————————————-

    Back to the PDN  news report…
    Olympic Hot Springs Road temporary bridge in works; no time set yet to begin construction
    March 2o, 2016 Kilmer said….“I’m often reminded of just what an economic driver it is, not just in terms of hotel stays and restaurants and things like that,
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    $424,000 request
    The park service requested $424,000 for the project, Maynes said.The temporary bridge would be expected to be in use for about five years, she said.“During those five years, we will pursue plans and funding for a longer-term fix,” she said Saturday.Since the road is in an active floodplain, “a longer-term solution will take much larger effort,” she added.

    With a five-year funding bill in place, the National Park Service will work with the highway administration to complete “a major reconstruction on that site,” Jarvis said.

    But he also said that would take years.

    “We’ll be living with that temporary fix for three to five years,” Jarvis said.

    Washed out

    The road washed out when a dry Elwha River side channel was reactivated in a Nov. 17 flood.

    A second flood that occurred Dec. 8 and Dec. 9 caused additional damage to the road and nearby Elwha Campground.

    The damage to the Elwha Campground was extreme, Maynes said.

    “Some picnic tables were moved by the force of the water. Some are buried in silt. It’s unlikely that we will be able to get that open this year,” she said.

    Altair Campground was also damaged in the Nov. 17 flood. It had been closed because of damage done in a December 2014 storm.

    “Our neck of the woods has had a really tough winter,” said Kilmer, a Port Angeles native.

    Pedestrian bridge

    A pedestrian bridge over the side channel has been replaced by a small wooden bridge that can support emergency vehicles.

    Seedlings have been planted along the banks of the surviving road sections to prevent further erosion.

    “I know you’ve been getting a lot of rain up there,” Jarvis told Kilmer.

    “At least we’re getting some snowpack, both in the Cascades, the Olympics and the Sierras this year, which is a good thing.

    “The good thing on the Elwha is that it’s helped flush out all that sediment that was backed up on the rivers,” added Jarvis, referring to the removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams, a project that began in 2011.

    Kilmer described Olympic National Park as an “extraordinary asset that draws a whole bunch of people to our region.

    “I’m often reminded of just what an economic driver it is, not just in terms of hotel stays and restaurants and things like that, but my grandfather helped pave the road up Hurricane Ridge, so it’s been an extraordinary asset,” Kilmer said.

    The National Park Service system has 410 sites, including 58 national parks.

    The service has recently restored seasonal ranger hiring to peak levels, coordinated more than 400,000 volunteers, completed deferred maintenance projects and expanded partnership through a centennial program, Jarvis said.

    “All of these actions will help sustain our parks for another 100 years,” he told the committee.

    The National Park Service drew a record 307 million visitors in 2015 nationwide, Jarvis said.

    “These visits do more than provide inspirational, educational and recreational opportunities; in 2014, they drove over $30 billion in economic impact, supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs in communities around the country,” he said.

    ________

    Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56450, or at rollikainen@peninsuladailynews.com.

    Last modified: March 19. 2016 5:18PM

    By Rob Ollikainen

    ————————————————————

    Where there’s a will, there’s a Clallam County Commissioner named Bill Peach.

    Behind My Back | Find Your Park Open Doors Remove …

    www.behindmyback.org/…/go-find-your-park-open-doors-remove-barri…

    Feb 10, 2016 – Bill asked if the Olympic Hot Springs Road would be open by the 4th of …. On December 4, 2015, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation …