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  • Category Archives Free Enterprise? Supply and Demand?
  • WA State Laws on Huckleberries?

    WA State Laws On Huckleberries?

    Unbelievable, DNR has the nerve to pass laws and stick it’s greedy fingers into your “HUCKLEBERRY PIE PICKIN” enterprise.

    When we were kids, 1950-1960 our family used to go out and PICK WILD BLACKBERRIES to earn money.

    WOW, I’d work for a half of day, crawling over logs, sweating, scratched up, bee stung and sunburned … to get one gallon of berries.  

    We’d go home, get cleaned up and deliver the FRUITS OF OUR LABOR  to a Local Restaurants that wanted to make Wild Blackberry Pie.

    FREE ENTERPRISE WAS ENCOURAGED BACK THEN….

    BUT,  It was a really hard way for a  kid to earn $1.50 for school clothes.

    ————————————————————————

    Chapter 76.48.060 RCW Dispositions

    SPECIALIZED FOREST PRODUCTS

    76.48.210  SALE OF RAW OR UNPROCESSED HUCKLEBERRIES — Requirements.

    [2009 c 245 § 23; 2008 c 191 § 1.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.221 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    ——————————————————————————————

    WA State DNR SHALL, by hook or by crook, by law, by permit, by cost, by reporting, display of valid registration certificate required, by TAXING,  by restriction, by rule, by road closure, by destroying roads, by the EPA clean water act, by the ESA endangered Species Act, by endangered habitat areas,  by critical areas,  by RV’S, And, by LOCKED GATES,

    DNR SHALL CONTINUE TO RESTRICT THE PUBLIC’S USE AND THE PUBLIC’S  ACCESS TO PUBLIC LAND.

    Right down to $$$ permits, rules, reports and  restrictive regulations FOR SOMETHING AS SMALL AS A WILD HUCKLEBERRY!

    And, as usual? They are using? WHAT?

    —————————————————————————

    76.48.010  DECLARATION OF PUBLIC INTEREST.

    [2009 c 245 § 2; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 2.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.011 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    ——————————————————————-

    SPECIALIZED FOREST PRODUCTS

    76.48.210  SALE OF RAW OR UNPROCESSED HUCKLEBERRIES — Requirements.

    [2009 c 245 § 23; 2008 c 191 § 1.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.221 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

     

    76.48.085  PURCHASE OF SPECIALIZED FOREST PRODUCTS OR HUCKLEBERRIES — Required records.

    [2009 c 245 § 12; 2008 c 191 § 4; 2005 c 401 § 6; 2000 c 11 § 19; 1995 c 366 § 14.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.111 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.098  DISPLAY OF VALID REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED.

    [2009 c 245 § 13; 2005 c 401 § 9; 1995 c 366 § 9; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 11; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 13.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.121 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

     

    76.48.010  DECLARATION OF PUBLIC INTEREST.

    [2009 c 245 § 2; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 2.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.011 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

     

     

    —————————————————————————————-

     

    Chapter 76.48.060 RCW Dispositions

    SPECIALIZED FOREST PRODUCTS

    Sections

    76.48.010  Declaration of public interest.

    [2009 c 245 § 2; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 2.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.011 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.020  Definitions.

    [2009 c 245 § 3; 2008 c 191 § 9; 2007 c 392 § 3; 2005 c 401 § 1; 2000 c 11 § 18; 1995 c 366 § 1; 1992 c 184 § 1; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 1; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 1; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 3.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.021 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.030  Unlawful acts.

    [2009 c 245 § 14; 2007 c 392 § 4; 1995 c 366 § 2; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 2; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 2; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 4.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.131 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.040  Agencies responsible for enforcement of chapter.

    [2009 c 245 § 19; 1995 c 366 § 3; 1994 c 264 § 51; 1988 c 36 § 49; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 3; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 3; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 5.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.181 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.050  Specialized forest products permits — Expiration — Specifications.

    [2009 c 245 § 9; 2008 c 191 § 2; 2005 c 401 § 2; 1995 c 366 § 4; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 4; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 4; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 6.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.081 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.060  Specialized forest products permits — Required — Forms — Filing.

    [2009 c 245 § 4; 2008 c 191 § 3; 2005 c 401 § 3; 1995 c 366 § 5; 1992 c 184 § 2; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 5; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 5; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 7.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.031 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.062  Validation of specialized forest product permits — Authorized agents.

    [2009 c 245 § 10; 1995 c 366 § 15.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.091 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.070  Transporting or possessing cedar or other specialized forest products — Requirements.

    [2005 c 401 § 4; 1995 c 366 § 6; 1992 c 184 § 3; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 6; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 6; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 8.]
    Repealed by 2009 c 245 § 30.

    76.48.075  Specialized forest products from out-of-state.

    [2005 c 401 § 5; 1995 c 366 § 7; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 15.]
    Repealed by 2009 c 245 § 30.

    76.48.080  Contents of authorization, sales invoice, or bill of lading.

    [2009 c 245 § 5; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 7; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 9.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.041 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.085  Purchase of specialized forest products or huckleberries — Required records.

    [2009 c 245 § 12; 2008 c 191 § 4; 2005 c 401 § 6; 2000 c 11 § 19; 1995 c 366 § 14.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.111 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.086  Records of buyers available for research.

    [2008 c 191 § 5; 1995 c 366 § 16.]
    Repealed by 2009 c 245 § 30.

    76.48.090  When harvesting permit may be used in lieu of sales invoice or bill of lading.

    [1967 ex.s. c 47 § 10.]
    Repealed by 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 16.

    76.48.092  Surrender of copy of specialized forest products permit to permittee following stipulated use — Penalty.

    [1979 ex.s. c 94 § 8; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 14.]
    Repealed by 1995 c 366 § 18.

    76.48.094  Cedar or specialty wood processors — Records of purchase, possession, or retention of cedar products, salvage, or specialty wood — Bill of lading.

    [2009 c 245 § 11; 2005 c 401 § 7; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 9; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 11.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.101 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.096  Obtaining products from suppliers not having specialized forest products permit unlawful.

    [2005 c 401 § 8; 1995 c 366 § 8; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 10; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 12.]
    Repealed by 2009 c 245 § 30.

    76.48.098  Display of valid registration certificate required.

    [2009 c 245 § 13; 2005 c 401 § 9; 1995 c 366 § 9; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 11; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 13.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.121 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.100  Exemptions.

    [2009 c 245 § 22; 2005 c 401 § 10; 1995 c 366 § 10; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 12; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 7; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 11.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.211 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.110  Violations — Seizure and disposition of products and other items — Disposition of proceeds.

    [2009 c 245 § 21; 2008 c 191 § 6; 2005 c 401 § 11; 1995 c 366 § 11; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 13; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 8; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 12.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.201 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.120  False, fraudulent, forged, or stolen specialized forest products permit, sales invoice, bill of lading, etc. — Penalty.

    [2009 c 245 § 15; 2008 c 191 § 7; 2003 c 53 § 373; 1995 c 366 § 12; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 14; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 9; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 13.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.141 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.130  Penalties — Affirmative defense.

    [2009 c 245 § 16; 2007 c 392 § 1; 1995 c 366 § 13; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 10; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 14.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.151 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.140  Disposition of fines.

    [2009 c 245 § 18; 2005 c 401 § 12; 1977 ex.s. c 147 § 15.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.171 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.150  Department to develop specialized forest products permit/education material.

    [2009 c 245 § 24; 2005 c 401 § 13.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.231 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.200  Assistance and training for minority groups.

    [2009 c 245 § 25; 2008 c 191 § 8; 1995 c 366 § 17.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.241 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.210  Sale of raw or unprocessed huckleberries — Requirements.

    [2009 c 245 § 23; 2008 c 191 § 1.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.221 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.900  Severability — 1967 ex.s. c 47.

    [1967 ex.s. c 47 § 15.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.905 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.901  Severability — 1977 ex.s. c 147.

    [1977 ex.s. c 147 § 16.]
    Decodified pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 31.

    76.48.902  Severability — 1979 ex.s. c 94.

    [2009 c 245 § 27; 1979 ex.s. c 94 § 17.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.906 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

    76.48.910  Saving — 1967 ex.s. c 47.

    [2009 c 245 § 28; 1967 ex.s. c 47 § 16.]
    Recodified as RCW 76.48.907 pursuant to 2009 c 245 § 29.

     

     


  • Obama’s Affordable “FOOD ACT”

    OBAMA celebrates MLK holiday, VISITS SOUP KITCHEN

    Jan 20, 2014 WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama honored Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy of service MONDAY BY HELPING A SOUP KITCHEN PREPARE ITS DAILY MEALS and a host of administration figures fanned out across the capital to appear at holiday events.

    OBAMA TOOK HIS WIFE, MICHELLE, AND DAUGHTERS MALIA AND SASHA to DC Central Kitchen, which is a few minutes away from the White House by presidential motorcade.
    They joined an assembly line that was churning out burritos.
    ASKED WHAT THE BURRITOS WERE BEING STUFFED WITH?
    OBAMA SAID IT LOOKED LIKE LAMB.
    IT ACTUALLY WAS BEEF IN A SAUCE,
    ALONG WITH “UNIDENTIFIED” VEGETABLES AND CHEESE.
    ———————————————————————————–
    My comment
    Did HE THE President OR HIS family EAT any of THE AFFORDABLE (FREE) BURRITOS STUFFED WITH “UNIDENTIFIED” VEGETABLES AND CHEESE? (check for yourself)

    1.Images for obama and family feed people at soup kitchen

    Indeed, HE, THE PRESIDENT, AND HIS FAMILY, DID NOT SIT DOWN WITH THE PEOPLE, NOR,
    DID HE, THE PRESIDENT AND HIS FAMILY EAT WHAT “THEY FED TO THE PEOPLE”.

    WHAT ARE AMERICA’S ELITE FED?

    PRESIDENT OBAMAS “SPECIAL PEOPLE” ARE FED “IDENTIFIABLE” FOOD
    AT Obama’s, $40K a plate NYC fundraiser
    $40,000 per plate fundraiser .

    ———————————————————————————————-
    my comment

    Don’t get me started on “THAT”

    WHAT PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS FED TO “WE THE PEOPLE” OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA?

    I’ll bet you thought I was going to go off with some comment on OBAMA’S SUSTAINABLE, AFFORDABLE, HEALTHY, FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS FOOD ACT FOR “WE THE PEOPLE”?

    I’ll leave that for another post, titled
    “THE BIG GULP OF FOOD”
    THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RESTRICTING BY LAW THE list of “UNHEALTHY FOOD” THAT THE AMERICAN PEOPLE SHALL NOT BE ALLOWED TO EAT (a very,very long list)

    No matter what the government ends up calling their FEDERAL FOOD ACT?

    “THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE, SUSTAINABLE, FOOD ACT”?

    OR? AKA BEHIND CLOSED DOORS “HUNGRY PEOPLE WILL EAT ANYTHING THEY ARE SERVED”?

    AND OBAMA’S SPECIAL RICH PEOPLE SHALL EAT ANYTHING THEY WANT?

    Why would any INFORMED reasonable person be terrified of a GOLIATH FEDERALLY CONTROLLED, SUSTAINABLE, HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE, AMERICAN FOOD CONSORTIUM?
    ——————————————————————–

    PRESIDENT OBAMA’S ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THEN WORDS

    PRESIDENTIAL PRIORITIES IN THE BEST INTEREST OF WE THE AMERICAN PEOPLE?

    Obama, at $40K a plate NYC fundraiser
    $40,000 per plate fundraiser.

    White House defends Obama’s $100 million Africa trip

    Michelle Obama accused of spending $10m in public money on …
    ——————————————————————————————————
    Obama said he came to help the facility mark its 25th anniversary on Monday. Among those joining him there WAS SENIOR ADVISER VALERIE JARRETT.

    DC CENTRAL KITCHEN PREPARES THOUSANDS OF MEALS EVERY DAY FOR DISTRIBUTION TO LOCAL SHELTERS.
    ————————————————————————————————
    VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN APPEARED at the National Action Network’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. BREAKFAST, and later joined the Catholic Volunteer Network in SERVING A HOT LUNCH TO GUESTS AT SOME – SO OTHERS MIGHT EAT.
    ——————————————————————————————-
    my comment

    INDEED, VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN WAS SERVING AFFORDABLE FOOD,
    SO OTHERS MIGHT EAT.

    BUT, HE WAS DEFINITELY, PROBABLY, NOT EATING, WHAT THE OTHERS “DID” EAT. (no pictures online)
    ———————————————————————————
    SEVERAL OF OBAMA’S CABINET OFFICERS, including Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, as well as White House chief of staff Denis McDonough, ALSO TOOK PART in various holiday-related events.

    Posted: Jan 20, 2014 11:27 AM PST Updated: Jan 20, 2014 11:47 AM PST
    By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
    Associated Press Writer


  • USDA? Growth Management?

    Indeed, the United States Department of Agriculture is involved in the WA State Growth Management Act and much more.

    FARM ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATED WITH RURAL DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES

    Rural Economy & Population RURAL DEVELOPMENT POLICY

    THE WA State GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT

    Farm Practices & Management IRRIGATION AND WATER USE

    The SUSTAINABLE PLAN AGENDA FOR RURAL SOUTH THURSTON COUNTY?
    It is an “Agenda” that includes the USDA and a SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM
    ———————————————————————————————–
    This is an unbelievable statement

    PRINCIPLES OF A HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM
    These principles should not be construed as endorsement by any organization of any specific policy or policies.
    The collaborative process was led by a Food Systems and Public Health Conference Work Team funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
    —————————————————————————————————
    If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck …
    If it walks like a duck and talks like a duck
    it is probably a duck.
    And the bottom line is…. It has the webbed feet of “SUSTAINABILITY”
    —————————————————————————————————-
    United States Department of Agriculture
    Economic Research Service
    http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err-economic-research-report/err97.aspx#.Ut546bTTn4Y

    Local Food Systems: Concepts, Impacts, and Issues

    by Stephen Martinez, Michael S. Hand, Michelle Da Pra, Susan Pollack, Katherine Ralston, Travis Smith, Stephen Vogel, Shellye Clark, Loren Tauer, Luanne Lohr, Sarah A. Low, and Constance Newman
    Economic Research Report No. (ERR-97) 87 pp, May 2010

    This comprehensive overview of local food systems explores alternative definitions of local food, estimates market size and reach, describes the characteristics of local consumers and producers, and examines early indications of the economic and health impacts of local food systems.
    ——————————————————————————————————
    United States Department of Agriculture
    Economic Research Service
    Last updated: Monday, March 04, 2013 Related Topics
    • Food Markets & Prices
    • Food Access
    • Food Prices, Expenditures & Costs
    • Food Service Industry
    • Retailing & Wholesaling
    • Food Choices & Health
    • Food Consumption & Demand
    • Diet Quality & Nutrition
    • Processing & Marketing
    Related Data
    • Food Environment Atlas
    • Food Access Research Atlas
    • Food Expenditures
    • Quarterly Food-at-Home Price Database
    • Fruit and Vegetable Prices
    Related Reports
    • Local Meat and Poultry Processing: The Importance of Business Commitments for Long-Term Viability
    • Farm Activities Associated With Rural Development Initiatives
    • Comparing the Structure, Size, and Performance of Local and Mainstream Food Supply Chains
    • Local Food Systems: Concepts, Impacts, and Issues

    Related Amber Waves Articles
    • Solving Processing Issues a Key to Successful Local Meat Marketing
    • Local Foods Marketing Channels Encompass a Wide Range of Producers
    • On the Map: Density of Farmers’ Markets Highest in Rural Counties
    • Varied Interests Drive Growing Popularity of Local Foods
    • Local Food Supply Chains Use Diverse Business Models To Satisfy Demand
    ——————————————————————————————

    MORE ON THE United States Department of Agriculture
    Economic Research Service

    Topics
    • Animal Products
    • Crops
    • Farm Economy
    • Farm Practices & Management
    • Food & Nutrition Assistance
    • Food Choices & Health
    • Food Markets & Prices
    • Food Safety
    • International Markets & Trade
    • Natural Resources & Environment
    • RURAL ECONOMY & POPULATION
    Animal Products
    Aquaculture, cattle and beef, dairy, hogs and pork, poultry and eggs, sheep, lamb and mutton.
    Crops
    Corn, cotton and wool, beans, fruit and tree nuts, peanuts, potatoes, rice, soybeans and oil crops, sugar and sweeteners, vegetables and melons, and wheat.
    Farm Economy
    Agricultural productivity and science policy, beginning farmers, BIOENERGY, commodity outlook, farm household well-being, income and finances, policy, structure and organization, FEDERAL TAX ISSUES

    AND LAND USE, LAND VALUE AND TENURE.

    Farm Practices & Management
    Biotechnology, chemical inputs, crop and livestock practices, IRRIGATION AND WATER USE, and risk management.
    Food & Nutrition Assistance
    Child nutrition programs, food and nutrition assistance research, FOOD SECURITY IN THE U.S., poverty and income volatility, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and WIC Program.
    Food Choices & Health
    Diet quality and nutrition, education, information AND LABELING, food access, food consumption and demand, and obesity.
    Food Markets & Prices
    Consumer Price Index (CPI), expenditures and costs, food service industry, local foods, processing, marketing, and retailing and wholesaling.

    Food Safety
    Foodborne illness, LABELING and information policy, market incentives, government regulation, and response to incidents.

    International Markets & Trade
    Food safety, international markets, global food security, macroeconomic indicators, and trade policy.
    Natural Resources & Environment

    CLIMATE CHANGE, conservation programs, ENVIRONMENTAL quality, invasive species and organic agriculture.
    ——————————————————————————-

    THIS IS THE CONNECTIVITY OF THE United States Department of Agriculture
    Last updated: Saturday, May 26, 2012

    FARM ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATED WITH RURAL DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES

    Rural Economy & Population RURAL DEVELOPMENT POLICY

    THE WA STATE GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT

    Farm Practices & Management IRRIGATION AND WATER USE

    The SUSTAINABLE PLAN AGENDA FOR RURAL SOUTH THURSTON COUNTY, and it is an “Agenda” that includes a SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM
    ———————————————————————————————–
    This is an unbelievable statement
    PRINCIPLES OF A HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM
    These principles should not be construed as endorsement by any organization of any specific policy or policies.
    The collaborative process was led by a Food Systems and Public Health Conference Work Team funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
    ———————————————————————————————
    If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck …
    If it walks like a duck, talks like a duck
    it is probably a duck.
    And the bottom line is…. It has the webbed feet of “SUSTAINABILITY”
    ——————————————————————————————–

    There is no consensus on a definition of “local” or “local food systems” in terms of the geographic distance between production and consumption. But defining “local” based on marketing arrangements, such as farmers selling directly to consumers at regional farmers’ markets or to schools, is well recognized. Statistics suggest that local food markets account for a small, but growing, share of U.S. agricultural production. For smaller farms, direct marketing to consumers accounts for a higher percentage of their sales than for larger farms. Findings are mixed on the impact of local food systems on local economic development and better nutrition levels among consumers, and sparse literature is so far inconclusive about whether localization reduces energy use or greenhouse gas emissions.

    Keywords: Local food systems, farmers’ markets, direct-to-consumer marketing, direct-toretail/foodservice marketing, community supported agriculture, farm to school programs, Farmers’ Market Promotion Program, food miles
    In this publication…
    Last updated: Monday, December 03, 2012
    ———————————————————————————————-
    Read on if you are interested in an unbelievable disclaimer

    PRINCIPLES OF A HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM
    These principles should not be construed as endorsement by any organization of any specific policy or policies.
    The collaborative process was led by a Food Systems and Public Health Conference Work Team funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

    We support socially, economically, and ecologically sustainable food systems that promote health – the current and future health of individuals, communities, and the natural environment.
    A healthy, sustainable food system is:
    HEALTH-PROMOTING

    Supports the physical and mental health of all farmers, workers and eaters

    Accounts for the public health impacts across the entire lifecycle of how food is produced, processed, packaged, labeled, distributed,
    marketed, consumed and disposed
    SUSTAINABLE

    Conserves, protects, and regenerates natural resources, landscapes and biodiversity

    Meets our current food and nutrition needs without compromising the ability of the system to meet the needs of future generations
    RESILIENT

    Thrives in the face of challenges, such as unpredictable climate, increased pest resistance, and declining, increasingly expensive
    water and energy supplies
    DIVERSE IN

    Size and scale—includes a diverse range of food production, transformation, distribution, marketing, consumption, and disposal
    practices, occurring at diverse scales, from local and regional, to national and global

    Geography—considers geographic differences in natural resources, climate, customs, and heritage

    Culture—appreciates and supports a diversity of cultures, socio-demographics, and lifestyles

    Choice—provides a variety of health-promoting food choices for all
    FAIR

    Supports fair and just communities and conditions for all farmers, workers and eaters

    Provides equitable physical access to affordable food that is health promoting and culturally appropriate
    ECONOMICALLY BALANCED

    Provides economic opportunities that are balanced across geographic regions of the country and at different scales of activity, from local to global, for a diverse range of food system stakeholders

    Affords farmers and workers in all sectors of the system a living wage
    TRANSPARENT

    Provides opportunities for farmers, workers and eaters to gain the knowledge necessary to understand how food is produced, trans

    formed, distributed, marketed, consumed and disposed

    Empowers farmers, workers and eaters to actively participate in decision-making in all sectors of the system
    A healthy, sustainable food system emphasizes, strengthens, and makes visible the interdependent and inseparable relationships between individual sectors (from production to waste disposal) and characteristics (health-promoting, SUSTAINABLE, resilient, diverse, fair, economically balanced, and transparent)
    of the system