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  • Category Archives Endangered – Threatened – Sensitive
  • To Kilmer Who’s Endangered?

    The Bottom line
    WHEN IS CONGRESS GOING TO START PROTECTING THE HEALTH AND ECONOMIC WELFARE OF ENDANGERED AMERICAN CITIZENS?

    Email to Derek Kilmer,

    First there was the ENDANGERED spotted owl. (some planted to restrict logging)
    Then there was the ENDANGERED marbled marlette.
    Then there were the ENDANGERED WOLVES.
    THE WOLVES IMPORTED FROM CANADA WERE INFECTED WITH Echinococcus granulosus tapeworms.

    NOW THERE ARE ENDANGERED HUMAN BEINGS, ENDANGERED canine (wolf, dog, coyote). elk, deer, horses, cows, sheep (both domestic and Big Horn).

    AN INCONVENIENT (ILLEGAL) TRUTH. Until the Canadian Grey wolves were imported from Canada, we did not have the slavic (wild) form of Hydatid. Now, we’ve got it because the imported wolves were not certified disease free, and they carried the tapeworm. BTW, it is a federal felony to import any animal that has not been certified disease free.

    The definitive host of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm that causes Hydatid is the canine (wolf, dog, coyote). The intermediate host (where the cysts form) is ungulates – elk, deer, horses, cows, sheep (both domestic and Big Horn). People are also an intermediate host.
    ————————————————————————————————————-

    THE “CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY” IS BATTING NEARLY 1000 “SUE AND SETTLE” ENDANGERED SPECIES.

    AKA MESSING WITH MOTHER NATURE

    The Bottom line
    WHEN IS CONGRESS GOING TO START PROTECTING THE HEALTH AND ECONOMIC WELFARE OF ENDANGERED AMERICAN CITIZENS?

    ADDITIONS TO THE ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST IS BEING GUARANTEED BY
    The Fish and Wildlife Service USING SUE AND SETTLE AGREEMENTS.
    February 8, 2013 – The Fish and Wildlife Service released a four-year work plan detailing the years in which ALL the NOT-YET-PROTECTED SPECIES IN OUR AGREEMENT would get protective decisions or critical habitat designations.
    ———————————————————————————

    How Big is Sue and Settle?
    Posted on November 9, 2013 1:32 pm by Pearl Rains Hewett Comment
    HELLO CONGRESS ANYBODY HOME?

    September 9, 2011 – A FEDERAL JUDGE approved the landmark 757 species legal agreement between the Center for Biological Diversity and the Fish and Wildlife Service.

    November 20, 2012 – For the first time since 1996, the number of plants and animals waiting for federal protection dropped below 200, HIGHLIGHTING THE SUCCESS OUR AGREEMENT. According to the 2012 “candidate notice of review” released today by the Service, 192 SPECIES ARE AWAITING ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT PROTECTION.

    February 8, 2013 – The Fish and Wildlife Service released a four-year work plan detailing the years in which ALL the NOT-YET-PROTECTED SPECIES IN OUR AGREEMENT would get protective decisions or critical habitat designations.

    THE “CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY” IS BATTING NEARLY 1000 “SUE AND SETTLE” ENDANGERED SPECIES.

    BASED ON ONE FEDERAL JUDGE that approved the landmark 757 species “SUE AND SETTLE” legal agreement between the Center for Biological Diversity and the Fish and Wildlife Service.

    THE BOTTOM LINE HELLO CONGRESS ANYBODY HOME?
    ——————————————————————
    Action timeline – Center for Biological Diversity

    www.biologicaldiversity.org › … › Biodiversity › Species Agreement‎
    The decision came out of our landmark 757 SPECIES SETTLEMENT. … to sue the agency for failing to provide emergency Endangered Species Act protection to …. horned lark and Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly under the Endangered Species Act as …

    Action timeline
    1998 – THE CENTER FILED PETITIONS to protect the Chiricahua leopard frog and Gila chub as endangered species. Instead of issuing findings in response to these petitions, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dubbed the species “candidates” for listing with no explanation. Following A CENTER COURT WIN on the issue in 2001, the Service protected both species — and from that point on made sure to include more detail in its findings on candidate species.

    2000-2002 – THE CENTER PETITIONED for the Tahoe yellow cress, southern Idaho ground squirrel and dunes sagebrush lizard, to which the Service denied protection without even issuing individual findings. When the Center challenged that move in court, a judge found that even if the Service was relying on the more detailed findings in its annual candidate notice of review, it hadn’t justified delaying protection for the three species. But instead of protecting the species, the Service issued a new, more detailed finding that continued to put off protection.

    2004 – THE CENTER PETITIONED for 225 candidate species, requiring the Service to include more detailed findings in its annual candidate notice of review — as well as APPLYING ADDITIONAL PRESSURE to protect all 225 species. The Center was joined in the petition by Jane Goodall, E.O. Wilson, Barbara Kingsolver and other luminaries.

    2006 – THE CENTER AND ALLIES FILED SUIT in Washington, D.C., arguing that the continued delay of protection for roughly 280 candidate species was illegal because the Service was failing to make expeditious progress listing any of these species.

    2007 – The Center WORKED OUT A DEAL in principle with the Service to make protection decisions for all candidate species, plus hundreds of other species for which petitions had been filed. The deal, however, was never enacted and was rumored to have been nixed by a top Interior Department lawyer.

    2009 – THE CENTER AND ALLIES sent a letter to the Fish and Wildlife Service asking for new negotiations over all the candidate species and proposing a four-year schedule for listing them, as well as processing existing petitions.

    2010 – THE CENTER FILED SUIT over the Service’s failure to respond to petitions to protect 93 species, including the California golden trout, plains bison, black-footed albatross, 42 Great Basin springsnails and dozens of other species. In response to litigation and pressure from the Center, the Fish and Wildlife Service finally proposed protection for the dunes sagebrush lizard.

    July 12, 2011 – THE CENTER REACHED A LANDMARK AGREEMENT with the Fish and Wildlife Service THAT MANDATED PROTECTION DECISIONS FOR 757 SPECIES, including the Pacific walrus, American wolverine, Mt. Charleston blue butterfly, Pacific fisher, yellow-billed cuckoo and Kittlitz’s murrelet.

    July – August 2011 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AGREEMENT, the Service began moving species toward protection, including making rules for the Pagosa skyrocket, parachute beardtongue and DeBeque phacelia. The agency also proposed protection for 23 Hawaii species (19 being part of our agreement) the Chupadera springsnail and five southeastern fish species.

    August 8, 2011 – AS PART OF OUR AGREEMENT and a 2004 petition, the Service protected five southeastern fish species as endangered: the Cumberland darter, chucky madtom, laurel dace, rush darter and yellowcheek darter.

    August 9, 2011 – The Service issued an emergency order protecting the Miami blue butterfly, IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR AGREEMENT and in response to our 2011 petition.

    September 9, 2011 – A federal judge approved the landmark 757 species legal agreement between the Center for Biological Diversity and the Fish and Wildlife Service.

    September 2011 – The Service determined that 32 springsnail species in Nevada, Utah and California may qualify for protection under the Endangered Species Act. The Service also issued a final rule protecting Casey’s June beetle as an endangered species and designating 587 acres of critical habitat for it in Riverside County, Calif. Both actions were IN ACCORDANCE TO OUR AGREEMENT and in response to petitions we filed.

    September 26, 2011 – In response to our 2010 petition and 2011 notice of intent to sue for more than 400 Southeast species, the Service found that protection of 374 freshwater species in 12 southeastern states may be warranted under the Endangered Species Act.

    October 3, 2011 – The Service proposed to protect eight species of freshwater mussels in Alabama and Florida and proposed to designate nearly 1,500 miles of streams and rivers as critical habitat for the species. The eight proposed mussels WERE INCLUDED IN OUR LEGAL SETTLEMENT.

    October 4, 2011 – The Service determined that 26 species of Pacific Northwest snails and slugs might warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act DUE TO OUR SETTLEMENT. The 26 species were some of the 32 imperiled Northwest mollusks we’d petitioned to list in 2008.

    October 5, 2011 – The Service issued a final rule listing the Ozark hellbender as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act AS PART OF OUR 757 SPECIES AGREEMENT.

    October 7, 2011 – The Service designated the Altamaha spinymussel as endangered and proposed to protect 148 river miles of critical habitat AS THE RESULT OF OUR LEGAL SETTLEMENT.

    October 12, 2011 – The Service proposed to protect a rare, recently discovered Puerto Rican tree frog named the coquí llanero as an endangered species and to designate more than 600 acres of freshwater wetland as critical habitat. THE DECISION CAME OUT OF OUR LANDMARK 757 SPECIES SETTLEMENT.

    October 25, 2011 – DUE TO OUR SETTLEMENT, the Obama administration issued a new “candidate notice of review” identifying 244 plants and animals that need the protections of the Endangered Species Act to avoid extinction.

    January 9, 2012 – The Centerand Save Our Springs Alliance formally notified the Serviceof our intent to sue the agency for failing to provide emergency Endangered Species Act protection to a rare Texas animal, the Jollyville Plateau salamander, WHICH WAS INCLUDED IN OUR 757 AGREEMENT.

    January 23, 2012 – In response to our 2010 petition and AS PART OF THE SETTLEMENT, the Service announced that Endangered Species Act protection might be warranted for the scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper, or ‘i‘iwi.
    February 13, 2012 – FOLLOWING OUR AGREEMENT, the Service protected two colorfully named mussel species, the snuffbox and the rayed bean, under the Endangered Species Act.

    February 22, 2012 – UNDER OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service announced that it would evaluate whether to protect the Oregon spotted frog under the Endangered Species Act and requested information from experts and the public.

    March 12, 2012 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service protected two colorfully named mussel species, the sheepnose and the spectaclecase, under the Endangered Species Act. Both mussels were once common across the eastern United States but are now found in only a handful of rivers.

    April 16, 2012 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR AGREEMENT, the Service protected two tiny Southwestern springsnails under the Endangered Species Act and protected 19 acres of critical habitat for their remaining springs. The species are the Three Forks springsnail (petitioned for by the Center in 200) and the San Bernardino springsnail.

    May 14, 2012 – DUE TO OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for two plants, the Umtanum desert buckwheat and WHITE BLUFFS BLADDERPOD, FOUND ONLY IN WASHINGTON’S HANFORD REACH National Monument, as well as proposing to designate critical habitat.

    June 4, 2012 – In response to our petition and AS A RESULT OF OUR 757-SPECIES AGREEMENT, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that the Mt. Rainier and southern subspecies of white-tailed ptarmigans may warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act and initiated a status review.

    June 8, 2012 – IN RESPONSE TO OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service proposed to protect 35 plants and three tree snails on the Hawaiian islands of Molokai, Lanai and Maui under the Endangered Species Act.

    July 11, 2012 – AS THE RESULT OF OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service protected the Chupadera springsnail as endangered and designated about two acres of critical habitat essential for its conservation.
    July 23, 2012 – The service declared that another snail, the Sonoran talussnail, may warrant Endangered Species Act protection DUE TO OUR AGREEMENT.

    August 15, 2012 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR AGREEMENT, the Serviceproposed Endangered Species Act protection for six species of invertebrates that live in two sets of springs in drought-parched West Texas: the Phantom Cave snail, Phantom springsnail, diminutive amphipod, Diamond Y Spring snail, Gonzales springsnail and Pecos amphipod.

    September 10, 2012 – DUE TO OUR AGREEMENT, the Service proposed two rare East Texas plants for protection as endangered: the Texas golden gladecress and Neches River rose mallow, also proposing to designate 1,541 acres of protected critical habitat for the plants in Cherokee, Harrison, Houston, Nacognoches, Sabine, San Augustine and Trinity counties.

    September 17, 2012 – The Service finalized protection for 23 species on the Hawaiian island of Oahu under the Endangered Species Act AS A RESULT OF OUR SETTLEMENT. The agency also designated 42,804 acres (67 square miles) of protected critical habitat for the species, which include 20 plants and three damselflies.
    September 26, 2012 – ACCORDING TO OUR AGREEMENT, the Service proposed protection for the grotto sculpin fish and the Mount Charleston blue butterfly.

    October 1, 2012 – DUE TO THE CENTER’S SETTLEMENT with the Service, the agency proposed Endangered Species Act protection for the spring pygmy sunfish.

    October 2, 2012 – The Service proposed federal protection for two rare Arizona cacti along with 102,906 acres (161 square miles) of proposed critical habitat to conserve the species. The proposal to protect the Acuña cactus and Fickeisen plains cactus results from our 2011 settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity REQUIRING THE AGENCY TO SPEED PROTECTION DECISIONS FOR 757 SPECIES ACROSS THE COUNTRY. The Center petitioned for protection for the two cacti in 2004.

    October 2, 2012 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR SETTLEMENT, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for the Coral Pink Sand Dunes tiger beetle, a half-inch-long beetle that lives only in southern Utah. The Service also proposed to protect 2,200 acres of critical habitat for the beetle in Kane County, Utah.

    October 3, 2012 – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced it would protect a rare, recently discovered Puerto Rican frog, the coquí llanero, as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act. The protection includes 615 acres of freshwater wetland as critical habitat in northern Puerto Rico.

    October 3, 2012 – The Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for two species of freshwater mussels in the Tennessee River watershed, including the proposed designation of 1,380 river miles of critical habitat in Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee and Virginia. The decisions to protect the slabside pearlymussel and fluted kidneyshell WERE A RESULT OF OUR SETTLEMENT.

    October 3, 2012 – The Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for the Florida bonneted bat, the largest, rarest bat in the state, IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT.

    October 9, 2012 – The Service extended Endangered Species Act protection to eight species of freshwater mussels and 1,494 miles of stream in Alabama and Florida today, FOLLOWING OUR AGREEMENT.

    October 11, 2012 – The Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for Florida plants threatened by sea-level rise: the aboriginal prickly apple, Florida semaphore cactus and Cape Sable thoroughwort. The agency also proposed to designate 8,565 acres as protected critical habitat for the Cape Sable thoroughwort.

    OCTOBER 12, 2012 – THE SERVICE PROPOSED ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT PROTECTION FOR THE STREAKED HORNED LARK AND TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY.

    October 15, 2012 – The Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for two freshwater mussels and finalized 229 river miles of habitat protection for five fish in four Southeast states.

    October 16, 2012 – The Service proposed protection for 15 Hawaiian species (13 plants, a picture-wing fly and an anchialine pool shrimp), as well AS DESIGNATING 19,000 ACRES OF CRITICAL HABITAT.

    November 20, 2012 – For the first time since 1996, the number of plants and animals waiting for federal protection dropped below 200, HIGHLIGHTING THE SUCCESS OUR AGREEMENT. According to the 2012 “candidate notice of review” released today by the Service, 192 SPECIES ARE AWAITING ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT PROTECTION.

    January 4, 2013 – The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia denied a challenge by Safari Club International of our historic agreement, finding that Safari Club LACKED STANDING, IN PART BECAUSE THE AGREEMENT, IN REQUIRING TIMELY ACTION TO PROTECT SPECIES, is clearly consistent with the Endangered Species Act.

    February 1, 2013 – AS A RESULT OF OUR AGREEMENT, the Fish and Wildlife Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for the American wolverine.

    February 8, 2013 – The Fish and Wildlife Service released a four-year work plan detailing the years in which all the NOT-YET-PROTECTED SPECIES IN OUR AGREEMENT would get protective decisions or critical habitat designations.

    May 24, 2013 – IN RESPONSE TO OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service protected 35 plants and three tree snails on the Hawaiian islands of Molokai, Lanai, Maui and Kahoolawe under the Endangered Species Act.

    May 23, 2013 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT , theService today proposed to protect Kentucky glade cress under the Endangered Species Act, along with 2,053 acres of critical habitat.

    July 8, 2013 – In accordance with our settlement agreement, the Service protected six aquatic invertebrates from west Texas as endangered species (along with 450 acres of critical habitat): Phantom springsnails, Phantom Cave snails, Diamond springsnails, Gonzales springsnails, diminutive amphipods and Pecos amphipods.

    August 1, 2013 – FOLLOWING OUR AGREEMENT, the Service proposed to protect three flowers under the Endangered Species Act — Short’s bladderpod, fleshy-fruit gladecress and whorled sunflowers, found in Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee — along with 2,488 acres of protected “critical” habitat for the plants.

    August 14, 2013 – Following our agreement, the Service proposed to protect two butterflies in south Florida under the Endangered Species Act, along with 17,546 acres of critical habitat.

    September 16, 2013 – The Service finalized Endangered Species Act protection for two freshwater mussels, the Neosho mucket mussel and the rabbitsfoot mussel, following our agreement . The Neosho mucket mussel was listed as endangered, while the rabbitsfoot mussel was listed as threatened.

    September 25, 2013 – TheService finalized Endangered Species Act protection for two species of freshwater mussels in the Tennessee River watershed, including 1,380 river miles of critical habitat in Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee and Virginia. The decisions to protect the slabside pearlymussel and fluted kidneyshell resulted FROM OUR 2011 757 SPECIES SETTLEMENT.

    September 24, 2013 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service protected a rare cave- and stream-dwelling fish found only in Perry County, Mo., under the Endangered Species Act, but decided against protecting any critical habitat for the fish based on a newly developed conservation plan.

    September 23, 2013 – THE CENTER REACHED A LEGAL AGREEMENT requiring the Fish and Wildlife Service to make a decision on Endangered Species Act protections for the Sierra Nevada red fox, the eastern hellbender, the boreal toad, MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, the Florida Keys mole skink, the Bicknell’s thrush, and three Southeast freshwater species — the bridled darter, Panama City crayfish and Suwannee moccasinshell mussel.

    October 2, 2013 – The Service protected the streaked horned lark and Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly under the Endangered Species Act AS PART OF OUR HISTORIC SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT. It proposed Endangered Species Act protectionfor two flowers from Miami-Dade County — Florida brickell-bush and Carter’s small-flowered flax — as well as 2,707 acres of critical habitat. It also proposed protection for the yellow-billed cuckoo and the the northern long-eared bat.

    October 23, 2013 – AS PART OF OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service announced Endangered Species Act protection for three Florida plants threatened by sea-level rise: the aboriginal prickly apple, Florida semaphore cactus and Cape Sable thoroughwort.

    October 23, 2013 – IN ACCORDANCE WITH OUR AGREEMENT, the Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for two prairie butterflies in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions, the Dakota skipper and Poweshiek skipperling. The proposal included 39,035 acres of critical habitat.

    October 25, 2013 – AS THE RESULT OF OUR SETTLEMENT, the Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection for the “bi-state” population of THE GREATER SAGE GROUSE found in the Mono Basin of California and Nevada. The agency also proposed designating 1,868,017 acres of protected “critical habitat” to help the population, which had declined by up to 70 percent.
    Scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper banner photo by C.R. Kohley, courtesy of the State of Hawaii Division of Forestry and Wildlife’s Maui Forest Bird Recovery Project

    ——————————————————————————————————–
    • IPAA ESA Newsletter – 10/11/13 | The ESA Watch
    esawatch.org/2013/10/11/ipaa-esa-newsletter-101113/‎
    Oct 11, 2013 – Yesterday, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) Congressional WORKING … OF “SUE AND SETTLE” CASES ON NEW FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND ENDANGERED … the Pacific Northwest’s streaked horned lark and Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly.

    • Two Prairie Butterflies Proposed for Endangered Species Act …
    article.wn.com/…/Two_Prairie_Butterflies_Proposed_for_Endangered_S…‎
    Oct 23, 2013 – This spring THE NATURE CONSERVANCY AND PARTNERING AGENCIES released 60 endangered Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies into the … The Karner Blue Butterfly is a federally endangered species that is … Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly …. ON SECRET SUE & SETTLE AGREEMENT LIKELY LEADING TO 250 NEW ENDANGERED …

    • Stephen Moore: Using ‘Sue and Settle’ to Thwart Oil and Gas Drillers …
    article.wn.com/…/Stephen_Moore_USING_SUE_AND_SETTLE_to_Thwart_Oi…‎
    Oct 4, 2013 – Streaked Horned Lark, Taylor’s Checkerspot Butterfly Protected Under Endangered Species Act (CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY) 2013-10-02.
    ———————————————————————————————————
    THE BOTTOM LINE HELLO CONGRESS ANYBODY HOME?

    This entry was posted in Behind Closed Doors, Behind My Back, Demand Accountability, Dept. of the Interior, Dereliction of Congressional Duty, Endangered Species Act, FEDERAL ISSUES AND REFORM, Hello Congress is anybody home?, How Big Is Sue and Settle?, Politically Ignored, Sue and Settle. Bookmark the permalink.Edit


  • The Butterfly has Landed

    150 acres in Indian Valley has been designated by the Clallam County Planning Commission as OPEN SPACE for the ENDANGERED PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY.
    —————————————————————————
    Clallam County CHAPTER 27.08
    (c) Affect any other factors relevant in weighing benefits to the general welfare of preserving the current use property.

    Indeed, Weighing in benefits for the general welfare? By preserving the current use property? AS designated forest land in Clallam for the general welfare.

    Clallam County CHAPTER 27.08

    PURPOSE?
    FOR THE ECONOMIC WELFARE, SOCIAL WELL BEING, AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE COUNTY AND ITS CITIZENS

    THIS 150 ACRE OPEN SPACE FOR THE ENDANGERED TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY IS DETRIMENTAL TO THE ECONOMIC WELFARE OF ADJOINING PRIVATE PROPERTY OWNERS.

    ——————————————————————————————————–

    How did money from a federal grant to a land Trust in Calif. GET ACROSS STATE LINES and end up financing a WA State conservancy group for 150 acres of open space for the protection of an endangered Clallam County Butterfly?

    What does the expansion of a military base in Calif. have to do with designating 150 acres of Clallam County property to a WA State conservancy group as open space for an endangered Butterfly?
    ——————————————————————————————–
    In Clallam County on Nov. 6, 2013 the Planning Commission received comments from Jim Podlesny and a Mr. Dunn representing the/a “Nature Conservancy Group?” in Olympia WA.
    Questions were asked
    ———————————————
    Mr. Dunn volunteered information.
    My understanding of Mr. Dunn’s comments…
    1. A military base in Calif. wanted to expand.
    2. Some action? taken by a Calif. based LAND TRUST
    3. Resulted in a NNL? settlement? agreement?
    4. When asked, Mr. Dunn denied that mitigation was part of the process.
    5. Federal grant money exchanged hands? for NNL? AND OR OTHER?
    6. The Calif. based LAND TRUST received a FEDERAL GRANT
    7. The money for the 150 acres in Clallam County is from a FEDERAL GRANT?
    ——————————————————————————————————-
    After due diligence on the CHAPTER 27.08 requirement part of Clallam County, the commission approved 150 acres of land in Indian Valley as OPEN SPACE for the ENDANGERED PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY.
    —————————————————————————————–
    The bottom line

    I AM BOTHERED BY ALL OF THIS AND FEEL COMPELLED TO ASK HAS THE PURPOSE OF
    Clallam County CHAPTER 27.08 THE ECONOMIC WELFARE, SOCIAL WELL BEING, AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE COUNTY AND ITS CITIZENS BEEN FULLY CONSIDERED IN the commission approved 150 acres of land in Indian Valley as OPEN SPACE for the ENDANGERED PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY.

    —————————————————————————-
    OTHER FACTORS?
    This spring THE NATURE CONSERVANCY AND PARTNERING AGENCIES
    released 60 endangered Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies into the….

    What happens to private property owners in Indian Valley after these endangered species spread out and set up housekeeping on their ADJOINING PRIVATE land?

    Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies produce one brood per year. Adults emerge in
    the spring, between April and May and have a flight period of 10 to 14 days.

    During this period they mate and LAY CLUSTERS OF AS MANY AS 1,200 EGGS.

    Larvae emerge and grow until the fourth or fifth instar. Larvae feeding on
    a broad diversity of forbsin Puget Trough have been documented to enter
    diapause in mid-June to early July, hibernating through the winter

    Shall private property owners be deprived of their forest land under the endangered species act?

    Shall private property owners be required to by federal law to provide habituate and forgo all rights to harvest timber and all other use of their private property?

    SHALL A LAND TRUST APPLY FOR A GRANT OF PUBLIC TAX DOLLARS

    SHALL WILLING SELLER APPLY

    AND THE OPEN SPACE HABITAT FOR THE Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies

    SHALL BE EXPANDED IN INDIAN VALLEY IN CLALLAM COUNTY WA.

    ———————————————————————————————

    OTHER FACTORS?

    Federal Register, Volume 78 Issue 192 (Thursday, October 3, 2013)
    www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-10-03/html/2013-23567.htm‎
    Oct 3, 2013 – This rule: Lists the Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly as an endangered …. for Natural Lands Management (previously The Nature Conservancy of … checkerspot butterflies have been detected during the spring flight …… nest success has varied from 23 to 60 percent depending on the site (Altman 1999, p.
    —————————————————————————
    BACK TO THE MONEY TRAIL

    WHAT HAPPENS TO CITIZENS MONEY? PUBLIC TAX MONEY PAID? GRANTED? OR GIVEN TO NGO TRUSTS?

    CAN AN NGO TRUSTS TRANSFER CITIZENS MONEY? PUBLIC TAX MONEY? GRANTS? ACROSS STATE LINES?

    CAN AN NGO TRUSTS TRANSFER CITIZENS MONEY? PUBLIC TAX MONEY GRANTS ACROSS INTERNATIONAL LINES?

    WHO IS ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE GOVERNMENT AND CITIZENS FOR THE NGO PRIVATE TRUSTS DISTRIBUTION AND GRANT USE OF PUBLIC TAX DOLLARS?

    WHO IS ACCOUNTABLE TO THE CITIZENS FOR THE CITIZENS MONEY BRING PAID TO THE WA WATER TRUST?
    ———————————————————————————
    CHAPTER 27.08
    CLALLAM COUNTY OPEN SPACE CODE
    27.08.010 Purpose.
    To maintain, preserve and otherwise continue in existence, adequate open space lands for the current or future production of food and fiber, and TO ASSURE THE USE AND ENJOYMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND SCENIC BEAUTY FOR THE ECONOMIC WELFARE, SOCIAL WELL BEING, AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE COUNTY AND ITS CITIZENS in accordance with Chapter 84.34 RCW and the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 31.02 CCC, as adopted and hereafter amended, the following policies and procedures are hereby adopted.
    (3) In certain instances, public access may be detrimental to the resource(s) involved; therefore, public access points shall not be assigned to properties in which any of the following conditions occur:
    (a) The subject property involves an endangered or threatened species as provided by CCC 27.08.060(6), Endangered Species
    ——- ———————————————————————————————
    THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S CLALLAM COUNTY’S TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY? IS A DIRECT RESULT OF “SUE AND SETTLE”
    ———————————————————————————-
    OTHER FACTORS?
    • IPAA ESA Newsletter – 10/11/13 | The ESA Watch
    esawatch.org/2013/10/11/ipaa-esa-newsletter-101113/‎
    Oct 11, 2013 – Yesterday, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) Congressional WORKING … OF “SUE AND SETTLE” CASES ON NEW FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND ENDANGERED … the Pacific Northwest’s streaked horned lark and Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly.
    ——————————————————————
    OTHER FACTORS?
    • Two Prairie Butterflies Proposed for Endangered Species Act …
    article.wn.com/…/Two_Prairie_Butterflies_Proposed_for_Endangered_S…‎
    Oct 23, 2013 –

    OTHER FACTORS?
    This spring THE NATURE CONSERVANCY AND PARTNERING AGENCIES
    released 60 endangered Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies into the … The Karner Blue Butterfly is a federally endangered species that is … Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly …. ON SECRET SUE & SETTLE AGREEMENT LIKELY LEADING TO 250 NEW ENDANGERED …
    —————————————————————————–
    OTHER FACTORS?
    • Stephen Moore: Using ‘Sue and Settle’ to Thwart Oil and Gas Drillers …
    article.wn.com/…/Stephen_Moore_USING_SUE_AND_SETTLE_to_Thwart_Oi…‎
    Oct 4, 2013 – Streaked Horned Lark, Taylor’s Checkerspot Butterfly Protected Under Endangered Species Act (CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY) 2013-10-02.
    ———————————————————————————————————
    OTHER FACTORS?
    Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants, designation of critical habitat for Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly and streaked horned lark: Final rule, published Oct. 3, 2013, effective Nov. 4, 2013

    OTHER FACTORS?
    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designates critical habitat for the Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha taylori) and streaked horned lark (Eremophila alpestris strigata) under the Endangered Species Act. In total, approximately 1,941 acres (786 hectares) in Island,

    OTHER FACTORS?
    CLALLAM, and Thurston Counties in Washington, and in Benton County in Oregon, fall within the boundaries of the critical habitat designation for Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly.

    OTHER FACTORS?
    Approximately 4,629 acres (1,873 hectares) in Grays Harbor, Pacific, and Wahkiakum Counties in Washington, and in Clatsop, Columbia, Marion, Polk, and Benton Counties in Oregon, fall within the boundaries of the
    ————————————————————————————————————
    CHAPTER 27.08 (full text is on line)
    CLALLAM COUNTY OPEN SPACE CODE
    27.08.010 Purpose.
    To maintain, preserve and otherwise continue in existence, adequate open space lands for the current or future production of food and fiber, and TO ASSURE THE USE AND ENJOYMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND SCENIC BEAUTY FOR THE ECONOMIC WELFARE, SOCIAL WELL BEING, AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE COUNTY AND ITS CITIZENS in accordance with Chapter 84.34 RCW and the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 31.02 CCC, as adopted and hereafter amended, the following policies and procedures are hereby adopted.
    —————————————————————
    27.08.020 Applicability.
    This chapter shall regulate applications for, and the subsequent classification or reclassification of land as open space land and timber land, pursuant to Chapter 84.34 RCW, throughout Clallam County. Applications that involve properties within incorporated portions of the County shall require additional review by the appropriate jurisdiction’s legislative body.
    27.08.030 Authority.

    Clallam County adopts the ordinances codified in this chapter under the authority of Chapter 84.34 RCW. The Board of Clallam County Commissioners is the legislative authority to approve or deny open space land and timber land applications reviewed under this chapter.
    27.08.040 Administration.

    The Clallam County Assessor and the Director of the Department of Community Development, or his or her designee, are vested with the responsibility to administer the provisions of this chapter, unless otherwise specified. All applications shall be processed in accordance with CCC 27.08.170, Procedure.
    27.08.050 Definitions.

    Those definitions set forth in RCW 84.34.020 as adopted and hereafter amended are hereby incorporated by reference and shall govern and control the application and interpretation of this chapter. Applicable definitions include, but are not limited to, the following:

    (1) “Open space” refers to the open space program in its entirety, and often referred to as the “current use” program. For the purposes of this chapter, this includes “open space land” and “timber land” as defined below.

    (c) Affect any other factors relevant in weighing benefits to the general welfare of preserving the current use property.

    27.08.080 Open space land public benefit rating system.
    (1) The categories provided by CCC 27.08.060, Open Space Land Public Benefit Resources, are presented in the following table, which shall be considered in determining public benefit ratings for open space land applications. Public benefit points specified herein shall be assigned for each criterion met by the subject property, up to a maximum value within each of six (6) brackets. Earned points from each bracket are then totaled and matched to the open space land classification rate schedule in subsection (2) of this section. Except where noted, the specific feature considered must be contained within the subject property to be eligible. Properties which meet a given criterion shall receive the full number of points provided for that criterion.

    27.08.090 Public access policy.
    (1) Except as provided in subsections (3)(a) through (3)(d) of this section, applicants for open space land classification may agree to provide public access to the subject property and the features and resources contained therein. Such applications shall earn public benefit rating points in accordance with provisions of this chapter. Applications involving public access shall be accompanied by the landowner’s proposed rules of conduct and a description of how public access is to be managed within the limitations set forth in this section. The one-acre home site exclusion may apply in administering public access management by limiting access to those portions of the property outside the home site exclusion. Approved applications shall be conditioned to require approved signage pursuant to CCC 27.08.100, Signage.
    (2) The County Assessor’s Office shall provide applicants with terms of the Clallam County Public Access Policy as part of the application packet.

    (3) In certain instances, public access may be detrimental to the resource(s) involved; therefore, public access points shall not be assigned to properties in which any of the following conditions occur:
    (a) The subject property involves an endangered or threatened species as provided by CCC 27.08.060(6), Endangered Species;
    ——————————————————-

    IN THIS 150 ACRE CASE PUBLIC ACCESS IS DETRIMENTAL TO THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S CLALLAM COUNTY’S ENDANGERED TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY.
    —————————————————————————————
    OTHER FACTORS?
    IN THIS 150 ACRE CASE THE ENDANGERED TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY IS DETRIMENTAL TO BOTH PUBLIC ACCESS AND ADJOINING PRIVATE PROPERTY OWNERS.
    —————————————————————–
    CHAPTER 27.08
    IN THIS 150 ACRE CASE THE PURPOSE OF 27.08.010 CLALLAM COUNTY OPEN SPACE CODE

    OTHER FACTORS?
    WITH REGARD TO ASSURANCE OF THE USE AND ENJOYMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND SCENIC BEAUTY FOR THE ECONOMIC WELFARE, SOCIAL WELL BEING, AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE COUNTY AND ITS CITIZENS?

    IT HAS BEEN NULLIFIED.

    The bottom line

    I AM BOTHERED BY ALL OF THIS AND FEEL COMPELLED TO ASK “HAS” THE PURPOSE OF
    Clallam County CHAPTER 27.08
    regarding THE ECONOMIC WELFARE, SOCIAL WELL BEING, AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE COUNTY AND ITS CITIZENS BEEN FULLY CONSIDERED IN the commission approved 150 acres of land in Indian Valley as OPEN SPACE for the ENDANGERED PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S TAYLOR’S CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY.


  • Back to 1492

    Let me introduce you to MARV CHASTAIN

    He is one of the old timers with a history and he still has “living memories” of how it used to be in America. He has spent many years of his life trying to protect our rights.
    He is one of the many, since day one, who acknowledges, encourages, supports and enables me in my endeavor to become an American Somebody.

    In Marv’s honor, I am adding a new category to this site.

    ENDANGERED, THREATENED AND SENSITIVE

    Back to 1492
    A plan which is now in process of becoming federal policy ~ was hatched many years ago by two radical eco-freaks – Dave Forman the Earthfirst guy and Oregon State prof, Reed Noss.

    ——————————————————————————–

    “It is a bold attempt to grope our way back to October 1492 and find a different trail, a trail overgrown and nearly forgotten” – Words of Dave Forman, founder of Earth First – and more recently, a director of The Sierra Club. He goes on to describe his intellectual child, The Wildlands Plan: “We seek wolf tracks rather than gold” . . “Return big, charismatic species such as buffalo, grizzly bears, elk, wolves, puma (otherwise known as cougars) to their pre-Columbian haunts.” These are words he used to describe his plan for America – about 20 years ago. At the time, it appeared to be just another crazy rant. Today, it is a shadow plan being stealthily realized by government fiat.
    He goes on: “a vast system of connected wilderness reserves that would crisscross the continent . These reserves would dwarf the largest national parks. Rather than build roads, laborers would remove existing ones, along with dams, power lines and other human-made structures. Planners would choose the reserve sites with plants and animals, not people , in mind, selecting them not for recreational opportunities, but for their ecological potential. Up to half the contiguous United States would be involved in a transformation whereby “islands” of civilization would be surrounded by wilderness tracts and corridors.”
    Note: since the animals would be connected, the people would not – except by air – and probably we would be forbidden to use airplanes, since they might disturb the animals.

    “We live for the day when grizzlies in Chihuahua have an unbroken connection to grizzlies in Alaska, when grey wolf populations are continuous from New Mexico to Greenland, when vast, unbroken forests and flowing plains again thrive and support pre-Columian populations of plants and animals”. So says Forman and co-author Reed Noss, prof at Oregon State in Corvallis, OR.

    50 Grizzlies require about 12 million acres – about a dozen Olympic National Parks)

    “Our goal is to create a new polical reality based on the needs of other species”, Forman. In 1492, Cholera, rabies, smallpox, yellow fever were rampant. Without modern medicine, industry, etc and with people stacked up in big city high rises, they would become rampant again.

    You can bet the half of the US to be converted to an animal park is the Western Half – not the Eastern. It starts with places such as the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. Not too many people live here. It you destroy their livelihoods and industry, they will leave on their own.

    This is the philosophy behind the Elwha fiasco. Salmon is simply a word thrown in to get the backing of the public. But destroying the only spawning area for Elwha salmon certainly is not the way to enhance them. Forman’s dream is coming true. Do you like it?

    Government has already torn up many forest roads. Bureaucrats are working to deny people water, insist on huge “buffer zones” for most everything. They like to call it “science”. But it has all the earmarks of religion. Real science is that which you can prove. Unproven theories can just as easily be religion as science.

    For a dozen years bureaucrats working on unproven theories have denied us the use of a fabulous 70 acre piece of ground right next to the Port Angeles harbor. A few years ago, they denied us the valuable use of another large tract of waterfront property using the tribe as their excuse. The (so called) natives are simply immigrants who’s ancestors got here earlier than our European ancestors. Yet the WILD LANDS plan hints that maybe they will be allowed to stay in the great animal park to hunt with bow and arrow? I don’t think so. But, the idea is loaded with sentimentality – so they use it.

    One interesting and revealing clue about the true philosophy of modern “animal rights activists” is their selection of the species they attribute rights to. They are nearly all predators. Early settlers battled hugely against predators. Predators killed their livestock and sometimes people. To encourage people with the necessary skills and weapons, they put bounties on wolves and other predatory creatures. And I recall from my youth, men I knew who made their living off those bounties. Today, those bounties have been replaced with fines and/or imprisonment if you do kill predators. All of that helps to discourage folks from living in the country and eliminates attractive species (deer, elk, mountain goats, etc)

    I have video that shows salmon runs in the Elwha were excellent 50 years after the dams were built. Also video of the gorgeous Trumpeter Swans which visit the Elwha each winter – but not again after this coming one, and video showing the disgusting landscape and air full of rock dust when the upper lake was drawn down by only 10% back in the 90s. If your group would like to see it, let me know.

    marv@marvchastain.com