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  • Category Archives An Analogy
  • Making Stone Soup

    Making Stone Soup? You’ve never heard of it?

    OK… Let’s start here with the historical record of STONE SOUP, it  is a 1548 folk tale some paint as a lesson in “COOPERATION” found in many parts of the world. others just leave stone soup as a pure and simple confidence trick.

    The is an analogy. that  examines the 1548 “COOPERATION” of the people, by the people, and for the people vs. the pitfalls of the FEDERAL 2015 COORDINATION PROCESS, OF  POLITICALLY appointed  government  agencies, federal, state, tribal, and  local and their employees.

    Reasoning by “ANALOGY”  plays a role in strategic decision making that is LARGE  but largely overlooked.

    It  should inspire People to stop and think about the Politics in the  Federal “COORDINATION” process in America today.

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    Making Stone Soup 1548 (a folk tale)

    Soup of the people, for the people , by the people

    Based on COOPERATION by people in a time of need.

    Once upon a time, somewhere in post-war Eastern Europe, there was a great famine in which village people jealously hoarded whatever food they had

    It was a long time ago, after  a war between two kingdoms.  When the war was over, the surviving soldiers were all sent home.

    The soldiers had been given meagre  rations, and many ran out of food on their way home and had to resort to hunting in the woods or begging, and many died of hunger before making it home.

    Now it came to pass, that a group of three hungry soldiers were heading home to the same town, and they had run out of food, when they came upon a village.

    They knocked at every door in the village, but at every one they were told that there was no food. Indeed it was  a time of  great famine and the village people jealously hoarded whatever food they had

    With no other option, they went to the inn.

    “Innkeeper,” said the first soldier, “we have no food and have been walking for days.”

    “If you have money,” said the innkeeper, “then I have plenty of food for you.”

    “Good sir,” said the second soldier, “our army was defeated, and our wages taken as spoils of war, so we have no money.”

    “In that case,” replied the innkeeper, “I can be of no help to you.”

    “But perhaps you still can,” said the third soldier, “If you cannot offer us food, perhaps you would be so kind as to let us use one of your cauldrons today.”

    The innkeeper was perplexed.  If they had no food, why would they want a cauldron?  But he had a cauldron that he would not need that day, so he saw no reason to object.   “Alright,” he said, and led them to the store where his spare cauldron was.

    The three soldiers carried the cauldron out into the village square and began building a fire underneath it.  The innkeeper, still perplexed, looked on as the soldiers drew water from the well to fill the cauldron.  “What are you doing?” he asked.

    “Ah,” said the first soldier, “we are making stone soup.”

    “Stone soup!” cried the innkeeper, “why I have never heard such nonsense.  You cannot make soup from a stone!”

    The soldier smiled, but said nothing. He took a small bag from his backpack, and opened it.  Inside were several stones.  He took each one in turn, examined it closely, and sniffed it.  Eventually he chose three and dropped them in the pot.  “Ah,” he said, “these will make a good soup.”

    The innkeeper was stunned, and went back to his inn.

    Shortly afterwards, another villager appeared. “What are you doing?” he asked.

    “Ah,” said the second soldier, “we are making stone soup.”

    “Stone soup!” cried the villager, “why I have never heard such nonsense.  You cannot make soup from a stone!”

    “Ah no,” said the soldier, “that is where you are wrong.” He took a spoonful of the soup and tasted it.  “Yes, it’s coming along quite nicely now.”

    The villager was intrigued, and wanted to try the soup, but he didn’t say anything.

    “But there’s something missing,” the soldier continued, “maybe a little salt and pepper.”

    The villager jumped in at this point.  “I have some salt and pepper at home.  I’ll give you some in exchange for a bowl of your soup.”

    The soldiers looked at each other for a while, then eventually agreed.  The villager ran off to fetch the salt and pepper, and the soldiers added it to the pot.

    Another villager arrived. “What are they doing?” he asked the first villager.

    “Ah,” said the other, “they are making stone soup.”

    “Stone soup!  Why I have never heard such nonsense.  You cannot make soup from a stone!”

    “Ah, well,” said the first, “I’ll tell you when I’ve tried it.  I swapped a little bit of salt and pepper for a whole bowl!”

    One of the soldiers took a spoonful of the soup and tasted it.  “It’s coming along quite nicely now.  But there’s something missing,” the soldier said, “maybe a bit of carrot.”

    The second villager jumped in at this point.  “I have some carrots at home.  I’ll give you some in exchange for a bowl of your soup.”

    The soldiers looked at each other for a while, then eventually agreed.  The villager ran off to fetch the carrots, and the soldiers added them to the pot.

    One by one more villagers arrived, and one by one they swapped something in exchange for a bowl of the miraculous stone soup: potatoes, barley, cabbage, celery, turnips, beans….  As the ingredients were added, the smell of the soup got better and better, until all the villagers wanted to try it, and swapped something for a bowl.  But eventually the cauldron was full, but only half of the villagers had given anything.

    “Ah,” said the first soldier, “it is ready.  But you know what?  I always like a bit of cheese in my stone soup.”

    “You’re right,” said the second soldier, “it is ready.  But you know what?  I always like a bit of salami in my stone soup.”

    “You’re both right,” said the third soldier, “it is ready.  But you know what?  I always like a bit of bread to soak up every last little bit of my stone soup.”

    Hearing this, the remaining villagers ran home, each returning with a lump of cheese, a salami or a loaf of bread to exchange for his own bowl of this incredible stone soup.

    In the end, everyone in the village — including the soldiers — got a bowl of stone soup, with a lump of cheese and a slice of salami in it, and with a hunk of bread to soak up every last bit, and no-one was hungry.

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    THE SHORT FORM OF 1548  PEOPLES COOPERATION

    Making Stone Soup of the people, for the people , by the people…

    A community effort of PEOPLE, coming together, in a time of great hardship and need.

    1. People bring wood and start a Bonfire in the town square

    2. A huge caldron is provided by the local  innkeeper

    3. A bucket brigade fills it with water from a stream

    4. The soldier throws in the soup starter, a stone

    5. People bring contributions in exchange for a bowl of soup.

    6. A little bit of salt and pepper. some carrots, a chicken, potatoes, onion, rice, barley, cabbage, celery, turnips, beans,  peas, several large bunches of BROCCLI,  seven crawdad’s are added, 2 pork sausages, a hand full of peanuts,  bits of cheese, a few pieces of beef, slices of salami and  loaves of bread.

    The last to arrive was a fisherman,  he said, “I had nothing to give in exchange for bowls of soup for my hungry family, so I went fishing, and by the grace of God, I caught this fish, please put it into the pot”

    7. In the end, everyone, all of the people in the village — including the soldiers, the mayor and the city council,  — got a bowl of stone soup, with a lump of cheese and a slice of salami in it, and with a hunk of bread to soak up every last bit, and no-one was hungry.

    Hmmm.. Stone Soup of the people, for the people , by the people…

     IN SEVEN EASY STEPS

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    Reasoning by “ANALOGY”  plays a role in strategic decision making that is LARGE  but largely overlooked.

    THIS ANALOGY should inspire OUR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES TO  stop and think about the RESULTS OF THEIR Government coordination process in AMERICA  today.

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    THE LONG FORM OF 2015 GOVERNMENT COORDINATION  POLICY

    Making Stone soup

    Based on the know pitfalls of the POLITICO  government to government coordination plan

    Indeed, Too many government cooks can spoil the broth  in 2015, especially when about  half of them are vegetarians’  and the broth is made from beef, pork  or chicken.

    Under The bipartisan Healthy Sustainable Food Act

    In 2015  THE MAKING OF THE STONE SOUP must be coordinated by  an appointed  Soup committee of government  agencies, federal, state, tribal, and  local and their employees. As it requires  federally mandated access to healthy local foods, the appointed politico Soup Coordination Committee must  approve the Soup Making events and the  ingredients, as required by the best  available science on Healthy food.

    “What are they doing?” asks the first out of town, appointed Soup Commissioner Clueless.

    “Ah,” said a person from the Local Soup Kitchen, “We  are making stone soup for hungry people.”

    Commissioner Clueless  responds with “Stone soup!  Why I have never heard such nonsense.  You cannot make soup from a stone!”

    The mayor exclaims, ” Close it down, it is illegal, the local people  did not get a permit for this event.”

    The director of the Local Soup Kitchen immediately applies for a emergency permit for the event. He is advised that it will take 90-120 days.  The EPA requires an environmental impact statement and the local health dept needs time to review the Soup Kitchen’s health violations prior to issuing a permit.

    Making Stone Soup in 2015

    THE  COMPROMISE  of  GOVERNMENT COORDINATION

    1. People bring wood and start a Bonfire in the town square

    Problem?

    a. Where did you get that wood? It’s illegal to cut firewood in designated wild forests.

    b. Put out that bonfire,  the President signed an executive order on carbon emission, I’m calling Ecology and the EPA, I’m going to report you, there is air quality burn ban in effect,  There is a smog alert in effect, you are contaminating the atmosphere ,We don’t even allow cigarette smoking here,  you’ll start a wildfire, I am allergic to smoke.

    COORDINATION COMPROMISE

    The wood cutter is arrested, the bonfire  is put out. Does anyone have a propane stove?

    2. A huge caldron is provided by the local  innkeeper and placed over the propane stove

    3. The town is in a drought emergency and there is no public water supply. A bucket brigade fills the caldron with water from a nearby stream

    Problem?

    a. You can’t take water from that stream, that water is for the fish, put it back, I calling WDFW enforcement and the tribes and they will arrest  you.

    b. Is that pure filtered water? Does it have chlorine or fluoride in it?

    COORDINATION COMPROMISE

    All of the water is carried back and poured in the stream, pure filtered water must be used or no water at all. The national guard is called and a helicopter arrives with bottled, pure filtered water.

    The huge caldron provided by the local  innkeeper is filled with pure filtered water and placed over the propane stove.

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    4. The soldier gets out his soup starter stones to throw in the  caldron.

    Problem?

    I’m from the State Health Dept., don’t you dare put those filthy rocks in the soup, that’s disgusting,   who knows where those stones have been, they could cause a pandemic. Show me your food handlers permit.

    COORDINATION COMPROMISE

    No stones are permitted  in the stone soup.

    Hmmm.. so much for the STONE soup.

    We’ll just call it “soup de jour”

    So far, hours have passed and the hungry people have made it to this point … a cauldron full of water over a propane stove, food handlers permit of all participants have been verified and the local soup kitchen has been reluctantly allowed to continue  because they have a pending emergency permit .

    Yep, that’s how it works for PEOPLE  in 2015 , using the government COORDINATION process.

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    5. The local People bring contributions in exchange for a bowl of soup.

    THIS IS WHERE THE SOUP HITS THE PROVERBIAL FAN

     The best  available science for the Healthy Soup Making ingredients.  

    Problems? Problems? Problems?

    From the “SOUP TO NUTS” is an American English idiom conveying the meaning of “FROM BEGINNING TO END”.

    The partisan political agenda that over rules the people’s solution

    Problems? Problems? Problems?

    6. A little bit of salt and pepper, some carrots, a chicken, potatoes, a few pieces of beef, onion, rice, barley, cabbage, celery, turnips, beans, okra, peas, tomatoes, several large bunches of BROCCOLI,  seven crawdad’s are added, two pork sausages, a hand full of peanuts,  bits of cheese, , slices of salami and  loaves of bread.

    The last to arrive was a local fisherman,  he said, “I had nothing to give in exchange for bowls of soup for my starving family, so I went fishing, and by the grace of God, I caught this fish, please put it into the pot”

    Problems? Problems? Problems?

    a. SALT  is a problem? You can’t put salt in the soup it is unhealthy for people. It causes high blood pressure. many people are on a low salt, no salt diet

    b. CHICKEN is a problem?  I am a strict vegetarian, a vegan I do not eat chicken. Was that chicken grown without hormones? Is it a free range chicken? Was it grown under PETA humane conditions?

    c. POTATOES, RICE AND BREAD  are a problem?  White food makes people obese  Are you trying to kill everyone? Obesity has led to over 120,000 preventable deaths … Obesity is an epidemic in America. Bread contains gluten. I must have gluten free food only, I won’t eat anything that is not on my gluten free food list.

    d. BEEF is a problem?  Beef is loaded with cholesterol, High cholesterol affects 42 million Americans, and 63 million more have borderline high cholesterol High blood cholesterol is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. I’m a strict vegan, I don’t eat meat.  Was that cow  grown without hormones? Cows are the  major cause of air pollution, their poop is contaminating the entire earth. Was it grown without hormones, without antibiotics and under PETA humane conditions?

    e. VEGETABLES are a problem? carrots onion, barley, cabbage, celery, turnips, beans, okra, peas and several large bunches of BROCCOLI.

    Don’t try to pull a fast one on us. This committee watched the GMO movie 85% of the food we eat daily contains…    GMO’s  are present in 85% of processed foods in America. I will not eat genetically modified anything. Are those vegetables ORGANICALLY grown?  Show me the ORGANIC labeling. BROCCOLI, Are you an idiot, everybody hates broccoli, it is the most despised vegetable know to man.

     f. CRAWDADS and PEANUTS are a problem?… For God sake are you trying to kill somebody? This is a public health issues We must prohibit fish and seafood, as they  can cause severe allergic reactions, some people are allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish.

    g. PORK SAUSAGE and SALAMI? are a problem Forget it, pork is pigs meat, it is prohibited among those of the Islamic and the Jewish faith. Muslims are forbidden by God to eat the meat of the pig (pork).,  You don’t feed sausage  and salami, a blend of ground pork, garlic, sea salt, containing, High, fat, cholesterol and salt, to those who cannot eat pork.

    h. CHEESE  is a problem? Forget it, High fat, cholesterol, salt, Cheese made from Cows milk, cows are the  major cause of air pollution, their poop is contaminating the entire earth. And, many people are vegetarians, vegans, and lactose intolerant.

     i. ONE SINGLE FISH  is a big problem? This fish is an endangered salmon. It’s fins have not been cut, this is illegal, arrest that man on the prima facie evidence of possession and confiscate that fish.

     It’s actually a big deal,  for people, as the Federally Appointed Public Soup Committee, we must prohibit putting  illegal endangered salmon in the Public  soup…  for the protection of the public health.

    COORDINATION COMPROMISE

    a. No SALT in the soup

    b. No CHICKEN in the soup

    c. No POTATOES in the soup

    d. No BEEF in the soup

    e. No VEGETABLES

    f. No CRAWDADS and PEANUTS

    g. No PORK SAUSAGE and SALAMI

    h. No CHEESE

    i.  No FISH with or without  fins

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    7. In the end, THIS ANALOGY IS A  BIG DEAL FOR THE PEOPLE, using the FEDERAL 2015 COORDINATION PROCESS, by  appointed  government  agencies, federal, state, tribal, and  local and their employees.

    The Hungry people, everyone single of them, were provided with a bowl of Healthy, Federally approved GOVERNMENT PUBLIC HOT WATER SOUP.

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    Reasoning by ANALOGY plays a role in strategic decision making that is LARGE but largely overlooked.

    In this analogy,  Politico Government cooks with good intentions sacrificed (threw out the baby with the bathwater) in an attempt to make their Soup healthier for the public.

    Throw out the baby with the bathwater is an idiomatic expression and a concept used to suggest an avoidable error in which something good is eliminated when trying to get rid of something bad, or in other words, rejecting the essential along with the inessential.

    If you understand this analogy no explanation is necessary

    If you don’t understand this analogy no explanation is possible.