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SES Sabotage on Trump’s Administration

Ibid., ¶ 4, line 1 –“Often sabotage is unrecognizable because of the

virtually invisible ways civil servants can act in bad faith toward

political executives.”

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Ibid., ¶ 4, line 6 –“People in the White House are aware of those sub governments but have no obvious control over them.”

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Ibid., ¶ 5, line 1 –“…Political executives who try to exercise leadership within

government may encounter intense opposition that they can neither avoid nor reconcile.”

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  1. 252, ¶ 3, line1 –“Political appointees can sometimes encounter

much more vigorous forms of sabotage. These range from minor

needling to massive retaliation.”

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  1. 254, ¶ 1 after quote, line1 –“…[W]hile academics write about

the iron triangle as if it were an immutable force, or prudent political

executives recognize that although they cannot stop bureaucratic

sabotage, neither are they helpless against it.”

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unedited full text in chronological order   circa unknown

Reading Number 37 from A Government of Strangers by Hugh Heclo

www.oswego.edu/~ruddy/Reading%20Number%2037.pdf

officials has become extraordinarily difficult in Washington.” p. 250, ¶ 1 … Political executives who try to exercise leadership within government may encounter.

  1. 249, introduction/abstract, line 3 –

“Presidents select a small number (a few thousand) of high-level people to head the executive branch agencies. Among those appointments are cabinet secretaries,

undersecretaries, assistant secretaries, and the like.

THE REST OF THOSE WHO WORK IN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH ARE CIVIL SERVANTS, CHOSEN FOR GOVERNMENT JOBS BY MERIT EXAMS, AND THEY REMAIN IN GOVERNMENT SERVICE FOR MANY YEARS, EVEN DECADES.”

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Ibid., introduction/abstract, line 9 –“Helco identifies the often-unseen tension

between a president’s appointees and the bureaucrats.”

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Ibid., ¶ 1, line 1 –“Every new administration gives fresh impetus to an age-old

struggle between change and continuity, between political leadership and bureaucratic power.

Bureaucrats have a legitimate interest in maintaining the integrity of

government programs and organizations.”

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Ibid., ¶ 2, line 1 –“The search for effective  political leadership in a

bureaucracy of responsible career officials has become extraordinarily

difficult in Washington.”

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  1. 250, ¶ 1, line1 –“Congress is widely thought to have lost power to

the executive branch, but congressional rather than executive behavior

remains a major preoccupation in political research. Observers acknowledge

that no president can cope with more than a tiny fraction of the decision making

in government…”

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Ibid., ¶ 4, line 1 –“…The administrative machinery in Washington represents

a number of fragmented power centers rather than a set of subordinate unites

under the President.”

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Ibid., ¶ 4, line 6 –“People in the White House are aware of those sub governments but have no obvious control over them.”

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Ibid., ¶ 5, line 1 –“…Political executives who try to exercise leadership within

government may encounter intense opposition that they can neither avoid nor reconcile.”

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Ibid., ¶ 5, line 7 –“Many… sincerely believe in their bureau’s purpose and

feel they must protect its jurisdiction, programs, and budget at all costs.”

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  1. 251, ¶ 2, line1 –“The structure of most bureaucratic sabotage has been characterized as an ‘iron triangle’

uniting a particular government bureau, its relevant interest group, and congressional supporters.”

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Ibid., ¶ 3, line 1 –“The common features of these sub governments are

enduring mutual interests across the executive and legislative branches

and between the public and private sectors.”

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Ibid., ¶ 4, line 1 –“Often sabotage is unrecognizable because of the

virtually invisible ways civil servants can act in bad faith toward

political executives.”

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  1. 252, ¶ 3, line1 –“Political appointees can sometimes encounter

much more vigorous forms of sabotage. These range from minor

needling to massive retaliation.”

———————————————-

  1. 254, ¶ 1 after quote, line1 –“…[W]hile academics write about

the iron triangle as if it were an immutable force, or prudent political

executives recognize that although they cannot stop bureaucratic

sabotage, neither are they helpless against it.”

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  1. 255, last ¶, line1 –“Thus the political executives’ own positive efforts are the necessary – if not always sufficient – condition for combating sabotage.

Since some bureaucratic subversion is an ever-present possibility and since punishment is difficult,

the government executives’ real choice is to build and use their political relationships or forfeit most other strategic resources for leadership.”

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Just saying REALLY?

Circa 1977  And yet the fact re­mains that whether the President relies mainly on his White House aides or his cabinet officials,

someone is suppose to be listening to the bureaucracy “out there.”

For the President, his appointees, and high-ranking bureaucrats, the struggle to control the bureaucracy is usually a leap into the dark.

Despite the host of management and organizational studies, Washington exposés and critiques of the bureaucracy very little information is available about the working world, and everyday conduct of the top people in government.

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