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Find Your Park History Camp Elwha CCC 935

My park is the Olympic National Park

FIND YOUR PARKS PAST

1933-1942 CCC CAMPS IN WA STATE
May 21, 1933, Project F-17, Co. #935 CAMP ELWHA,

Things happen that should always be remembered

After over 40 hours of researching on the CCC Camps Legacy in my park, the Olympic National Park, I have found the “KEY” for documenting and identifying WA State and Clallam County CCC CAMPS.
I started here.

Olympic NP: Historic Resource Study (Chapter 5)

www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online…/hrs/chap5.htm
National Park Service Oct 1, 2009 – Three of these programs had a paramount influence on the early development of Olympic National Park: The Civilian Conservation Corps …National Park Service
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Found this…
ON 10 JUNE 1933 the PORT ANGELES EVENING NEWS (PAEN) devoted headline space and several columns to describing the establishment of the ELWHA CAMP, known as F-17:

F-17 935 5/21/1933 Seattle Port Angeles
Project Co. Date Railroad Post Office Location

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Feb 2, 2016 documentation finally found here

CCC Camp Lists – CCC Legacy

Historic Index of Camp Listings by State
1933-1942 CCC CAMPS IN WA STATE
May 21, 1933, Project F-17, Co. #935 CAMP ELWHA,

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The completer list of historic CCC CAMPS IN WA STATE can be found here
Feb 2, 2016

Find Your Park? 1933 WA State CCC Camps – Behind My …

Posted on February 2, 2016 12:20 pm by Pearl Rains Hewett
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Find Your Park – Centennial (U.S. National Park Service)

GO FIND YOUR PARKS PAST…
Find Your Park Things happen that should always be remembered?
Find Your Park SHARE YOUR PARKS STORY..
SHARE YOUR PARKS HISTORY.INSPIRE SOMEONE ELSE…..
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Olympic NP: Historic Resource Study (Chapter 5)

Unedited text for CAMP ELWHA

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NOTE Camp Elwha was incorrectly identified as the 936th company, on 10 June 1933, in the Port Angeles Evening News ,
F-74 936 5/11/1934 Hoquiam Humptulips Hoquiam 30 mi N

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The Civilian Conservation Corps
Olympic NP: Historic Resource Study (Chapter 5)
Camp Elwha. Among the most active CCC camps within the present Olympic National Park was Camp Elwha, located on a gently sloping hillside several hundred yards south of the present Elwha Ranger Station. As one of the first CCC camps established on the north Olympic Peninsula, the arrival of the “forest army” on the Elwha River aroused great interest among local residents. On 10 June 1933 the Port Angeles Evening News devoted headline space and several columns to describing the establishment of the Elwha Camp, known as F-17:
Two hundred and twenty strong, the 936th company Civilian Conservation Corps of the United States is in camp on “My Rose” creek up the Elwha canyon, within a stone’s throw of the soldiers’ bridge—and taking part in the greatest single government venture these parts have glimpsed since spruce division days of the world war. . . . In a tented city now, the “new forestry army” is rapidly completing a modern and elaborate camp headquarters in a clearing between Griff and My Rose creeks. On the site, 100,000 board feet of lumber is rapidly taking shape in the form of barracks, headquarters buildings, infirmary, dining hall, store room, camp exchange, etc., and District Forester Vallad announced today that construction would also begin immediately on a bunkhouse, warehouse and oil storage plant for the regular Forest Service (PAEN 1933, 10 June).
The work program outlined for both the main Elwha Camp and the side camp at Slab Camp in the hills southeast of Port Angeles included the construction of roads from the Elwha Ranger Station to Hayes River (on the Elwha River); from Danz Ranch at the forest boundary to Deer Park lookout, to Ennis Creek Ranger Station, and then to the Lost Mountain Road; and from the Little River Road to Ennis Creek Ranger Station. Work plans also called for the widening and straightening of the Olympic (Boulder Creek) Hot Springs Road plus the improvement of several campgrounds (PAEN 1933, 10 June).
A month later, in mid July, the tents at the Elwha CCC Camp were gone and the headquarters for the 180-man company had taken on the look of permanence. Added to the original cluster of camp buildings were four 104 x 22 foot barracks structures, a mess hall, an administration building, a bathhouse with a “Niagara Falls” shower and ancillary workshops and storage buildings. Road projects were also proceeding with haste. By mid July, one and one-half miles of road were completed to Glines Canyon, and road crews were pushing toward Heart O’the Hills. The local press noted, “The road jobs now being carried forward by the CCC crews in the Elwha forest district will effect improvements of vital importance to [the] protection of Olympic timber from fire” (PAEN 1933, 19 July).
The morale of the first recruitment of Elwha CCC enrollees was exceptionally high. According to journalistic accounts, every member of the fledgling camp claimed that “Elwha camp has the finest crew of any in the country” (PAEN 1933, 19 July). In the early months of operation, there were reportedly few withdrawals; the men were healthy and spirits exuberant. One reason for this initial good spirit at the Elwha Camp may be attributed to the high percentage of enrollees from Clallam County, Seattle, and Bellingham, Washington. These men were fairly familiar and comfortable with the surroundings (PAEN 1933, 19 July). Unlike many CCC camps across the country that consisted of men transported great distances to their place of assignment, the early Elwha CCC camp was comprised of men almost exclusively from western Washington.
At the end of the first six month recruitment period, the esprit de corps continued to remain high as demonstrated by the great percentage of reenlistments and the reported accomplishments of the company. In late September 1933, the Port Angeles Evening News stated:
What is believed to be a probable record for Civilian Conservation Corps units in Washington is reported from the C.C.C. Camp on the Elwha river, where 91 per cent of the present force has re-enrolled for the second six month’s work period starting in October. . . . This is [sic] an exceptional mark! It indicates how the C.C.C. men and boys of the Elwha feel toward their camp and the opportunity the corps has given them to earn their living and help their families financially, in addition, corps leaders feel (PAEN 1933, 21 September).
Road building projects, which was to be the major thrust of Camp Elwha’s energies, continued unabated. By mid September 1933, a five-mile section of “truck trail” was completed up the Elwha River to Wolf Creek. A second major project involving road connections with the CCC Slab Camp/Danz Ranch, was likewise pushing forward (PAEN 1933, 21 September). Far from any roads, the CCC undertook the construction of a four-horse, shake-sided barn at Elkhorn Ranger Station during the summer of 1933 (UW 1934, 20 August).
By early 1934, twenty-two miles of road were completed by the Elwha CCC crews. A small crew was about to begin widening the road to Olympic (Boulder Creek) Hot Springs. Fifty men, still located at the Danz Ranch side camp, worked on roads to Deer Park and to Ennis Creek. A newly established side camp at Heart O’the Hills had thirty-five men engaged in building a thoroughfare from Heart O’the Hills to Coleman’s Ranch on the Little River. The road building projects accomplished by the crews from Camp Elwha aimed at providing the Forest Service with “a continuous roadway from the Elwha River to Slab Camp and the Deer Park region by way of Little River, Mount Angeles and Ennis creek” (PAEN 1934, 6 January). New telephone connections that eventually followed this route, plus the roads themselves, were principally for fire protection purposes.
At the outset of 1934 other projects, in addition to the construction of roads, were in progress or planned. These projects included the installation of a water and light system at the Elwha CCC Camp, and the construction of a new Ennis Creek Guard Station on the Mount Angeles Road near Heart O’the Hills. In addition, work on public campgrounds on the Elwha River at Lake Mills, Whiskey Bend and Altaire, was planned (PAEN 1934, 6 January).
Civilian Conservation Corps camps typically were located and relocated depending on the priority of work projects in a particular geographic area. Under the direction of the Forest Service, CCC camps and side camps on the Olympic National Forest were moved on several occasions during the 1930s. One year after the establishment of CCC Camp Elwha, orders were issued to abandon the campsite and relocate to a site seven and one-half miles north of Humptulips in the southern end of the Olympic Peninsula. (CCC Camp Snider, west of Lake Crescent, and Camp Twin, on the Strait of Juan de Fuca coast, west of Port Angeles, also shifted their companies in 1934.) While the corpsmen at Elwha made preparation for their move to Humptulips

in May, other CCC crews from the Louella CCC Camp near Sequim, took over completion of the road to Deer Park (PAEN 1934, 3 April). In recognition of the efforts of the CCC in completing the winding Deer Park Road, it became known as “The Highway of the CCC” (Carroll 1973, 103).
The phase out of CCC Camp Elwha was only temporary. In late September 1934 official announcement came from the Forest Service regional office in Portland, Oregon, that the abandoned but intact Elwha Camp (as well as the Snider and Twin Camps) would be restored to activity in October that year. During the winter months of 1934 and 1935, the Elwha CCC Camp was among fifteen National Forest Service camps in the state of Washington (PAEN 1934, 24 September).
For three years in the late 1930s Camp Elwha was used only at intervals as a small side camp (PAEN 1937, 16 July). Only sporadically CCC corpsmen continued to undertake projects on Forest Service land in the vicinity of the Elwha River drainage.

In the spring of 1935 “improvements” were made to both the Elwha and Altaire public campgrounds. Betterments at these two campgrounds included work on roads, trails, camping spots, the installation of water pipes, playground equipment, horse-shoe courts for adults, and the construction of sturdy, open-sided community kitchens.

The Port Angeles Evening News exuded enthusiasm in its description of the improvements at Altaire Campground made by the CCC: “There’s a splendid community kitchen, of rustic design, with a concrete floor and two 54-inch stoves built of rock and cement. There are long tables beside the kitchen and about the grounds are 17 tables and sufficient stoves, all constructed of stone, to take care of as many parties as the tables accommodate” (PAEN 1935, 27 March).
The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens, in 1983, are the only two remaining CCC structures of this type in Olympic National Park. Built of natural peeled logs, shakes and masonry, the rustic materials and careful proportioning of these structures blend well with their immediate natural surroundings.

The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens are representative examples of rustic style architecture, which became a hallmark of the CCC throughout the country (Throop 1979, 58).
When a large contingency of CCC enrollees transferred from Camp Snider several miles west of Lake Crescent, to Camp Elwha in the spring of 1937, additional campground development was undertaken at Olympic (Boulder Creek) Hot Springs, Deer Park and Ennis Creek, at the base of Mount Angeles.

In addition CCC crews made further improvements to the Olympic Hot Springs Road

and the Hurricane Ridge Road. Work crews at Deer Park, an Elwha side camp, pursued work on a new ski run and completed an addition to the Deer Park Camp building to accommodate winter ski parties (PAEN 1937, 21 April; 16 July).
During the CCC’s tenure at Camp Elwha several changes and additions were made by corpsmen to the existing Forest Service Elwha Ranger Station buildings. Eleven buildings stood at the ranger station site at the time the CCC established their camp nearby in 1933. Among the first projects undertaken by the Elwha CCC enrollees was the construction of a porch on the main ranger station building (PAEN 1933, 19 July). Two years later, in 1935, the ranger station was moved slightly, an addition was constructed and landscaping around the ranger station completed (PAEN 1935, 27 March). During the mid 1930s, corpsmen from the Elwha Camp worked on other projects at the ranger station. On Griff Creek, separating the CCC camp from the ranger station, CCC men built a water wheel to furnish electricity to the ranger station office and ranger residence (PAEN 1934, 21 March). Near the ranger station office, an incinerator was constructed for burning refuse from the CCC camp and public campgrounds in the area. The erection of the gas, oil and grease rack building in the utility area represented the largest outlay of CCC manpower and money at the Elwha Ranger Station (PAEN 1935, 27 March). It is the only building built totally by CCC labor in the ranger station complex that stands on its original site. The decorative pine tree design, used throughout the nation as the logo of both the Forest Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps, is cut out of boards on the porch and at the upper gable ends of this building (Throop 1979, 42). It symbolizes and serves as a constant visual reminder of the contribution of the CCC to the Elwha Ranger Station.
In addition to visible structural changes completed at the Elwha Ranger Station and elsewhere, the construction and maintenance of roads, and the development of campground facilities in forests on the north Olympic Peninsula, Forest Service Camp F-19 on the Elwha River planned and executed numerous other projects between 1933 and 1938.

Elwha corpsmen constructed and maintained trails, built bridges, erected signs and markers, conducted surveys, constructed fences and guard rails, laid and maintained telephone lines, built parking areas and parking overlooks, razed “undesirable” structures, suppressed fires and conducted field plantings (NARS:RG 95 1934, 1 June; 1937, 6 August; ca. 1938 n.d.).

The exact geographic locations of many Camp Elwha projects are not always readily identifiable and, in fact, much of their work has been obliterated over the years. However, the overall effect of the various CCC projects undertaken by the Elwha Camp is very much a part of the overall development of recreational use in certain areas in the northern part of Olympic National Park.
The work of the Elwha CCC Camps is not unique but, in fact, is representative of the kinds of projects pursued by several other work camps supervised by the National Forest Service on the Olympic Peninsula. Prior to the 1938 creation of Olympic National Park, other CCC main camps and side camps located on Forest Service land around the Peninsula likewise stimulated recreational activity in areas now contained in the Park.
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In the spring of 1935 “improvements” were made to both the Elwha and Altaire public campgrounds. Betterments at these two campgrounds included work on roads, trails, camping spots, the installation of water pipes, playground equipment, horse-shoe courts for adults, and the construction of sturdy, open-sided community kitchens.

The Port Angeles Evening News exuded enthusiasm in its description of the improvements at Altaire Campground made by the CCC: “There’s a splendid community kitchen, of rustic design, with a concrete floor and two 54-inch stoves built of rock and cement. There are long tables beside the kitchen and about the grounds are 17 tables and sufficient stoves, all constructed of stone, to take care of as many parties as the tables accommodate” (PAEN 1935, 27 March).
The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens, in 1983, are the only two remaining CCC structures of this type in Olympic National Park. Built of natural peeled logs, shakes and masonry, the rustic materials and careful proportioning of these structures blend well with their immediate natural surroundings. The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens are representative examples of rustic style architecture, which became a hallmark of the CCC throughout the country (Throop 1979, 58).

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Things happen that should always be remembered

The Elwha and Altaire community kitchens, in 1983, are the only two remaining CCC structures of this type in Olympic National Park.

AND, THEY WERE BUILT BY   CAMP ELWHA COMPANY 935.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam …

https://en.wikipedia.org/…/National_Register_of_Historic_Plac
Wikipedia

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Clallam County, Washington. This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts …
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Elwha Ranger Station
Elwha Ranger Station
July 13, 2007
(#07000716)
Approximately 3 miles southeast of WA 101 on the Olympic Hot Springs Rd.
48°01′00″N 123°35′27″W
Port Angeles

 

Altair Campground Community Kitchen
Altair Campground Community Kitchen
July 13, 2007
(#07000732)
Approx. 4 mi. S of US 101
48°00′42″N 123°35′30″W
Port Angeles

 

Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
Elwha Campground Community Kitchen
July 13, 2007
(#07000735)
3 miles south of U.S. Route 101 in Washington
48°01′39″N 123°35′13″W
Port Angeles

Things happen that should always be remembered

Olympic National Park News Release
March 20, 2014
For Immediate Release

Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said
“Within what is technically and economically feasible, we continue to do our very best to protect the area’s natural and cultural resources and its wilderness character,”

And,Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said . “Our options are limited, however, given the size and force of the river and the valley’s remote location within the Olympic Wilderness.”

Campground Status Feb 3, 2016

Altair Closed Closed indefinitely due to flood damage

 

Elwha Closed Closed indefinitely due to flood damage

Current Road Conditions

Elwha Area Notices:
• The Olympic Hot Springs Road is closed at the park boundary to motor vehicles due to storm damage. The road and all areas beyond the washout are closed to all public entry because of hazardous conditions along the road, river and adjacent areas.

And when this happened in my park on my road to my private property? Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, could have used the same song and dance?

BUT SHE SAID NOTHING

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Saving Enchanted Valley Chalet – The Wild Olympics Scam

www.wildolympicsscam.com/…/olympicagenda/SavingEnchantedValley

The much loved Enchanted Valley Chalet has had the ever encroaching river eroding the meadowed landscape away for NINE YEARS. The Park, well aware of …

Olympic National Park News Release
March 20, 2014
For Immediate Release

Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said
“Within what is technically and economically feasible, we continue to do our very best to protect the area’s natural and cultural resources and its wilderness character,”

And,Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum, said . “Our options are limited, however, given the size and force of the river and the valley’s remote location within the Olympic Wilderness.”

BLAH… BLAH… BLAH… SAME  OLD STORY “LET NATURE TAKE IT’S COURSE” JUST IN A DIFFERENT VALLEY

AS HILLARY WOULD SAY… WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT MAKE?

Key partners IN SAVING THE ENCHANTED CHALET  include the Washington State Historic Preservation Officer, Pacific West Regional Office of the National Park Service, and concerned organizations and citizens.

Which shall leave me asking on my next posting HOW PROTECTED ARE …

National Register of Historic Places listings in Olympic …

https://en.wikipedia.org/…/National_Register_of_Historic_Plac
Wikipedia

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Olympic National Park. This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the …

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BELOW just another Grimm Fairy tale?

Once Upon A Time in Olympic National Park

My “inside store” is kind of like the original Grimm’s Brother  fairy tale

You know the one… It starts off great..  but ends up with the Big Bad Wolf swallowing the grandmother whole and  the wolf eating Little Red Riding Hood..

Olympic Hot Springs (Elwha) Road Closed (storm damage) 1/17/16
The road is closed due to a washout just north of Elwha Campground, about 1 mile from the park boundary. Closed to public entry beyond the washout.

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